Physical Education Cherokee High School CHEROKEE VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE

Physical Education Cherokee High School CHEROKEE VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE

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Physical Education
Cherokee High School
CHEROKEE VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE
GRADES 9-10
HISTORY
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Volleyball was invented by William Morgan of Holyoke, Mass. in 1895 as
an alternative to the popular game of basketball. Mr. Morgan
originally called the game mintonette. Morgan borrowed the idea of
hitting the ball back and forth over the net from the game of tennis
and other techniques from the game of handball. The YMCA promoted
volleyball over the next thirty years, and in 1928 the United States
Volleyball Association was formed. Volleyball was first introduced in
the Olympics in the 1964 Games. In 1984, the U.S. men won their first
Olympic Gold Medal in volleyball. In recent years, the game has
evolved to include more action and force through the use of power
volleyball skills. Today, the best teams in the world compete for the
Triple Crown, which includes winning the Olympic Games, the World Cup,
and the World Championship in succession.
ETIQUETTE
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*
announce the score before each serve
*
roll the ball under the net when returning it to the server
*
play the ball only when it is near you allowing other teammates an
opportunity to be part of the game. (Although competition is an
integral part of the game, cooperation is important in setting up
the ball and accomplishing other team strategies.)
SAFETY
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*
In order to avoid an injury, it is important to learn and use the
proper hand and finger position when playing the ball.
*
When spiking, you must take care to direct the ball properly to
avoid injuring other players.
*
Teammates must be alert during the entire game, this includes the
serve.
*
The serving team should be focused on their server until the serve
is completed and the ball safely clears the net.
*
A white volleyball is considered suitable for indoor play.
RULES
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*
The object of the game is to send the ball back and forth over the
net so the opposing team cannot return it.
*
Regulation volleyball has six players per team, but to ensure full
class participation, Cherokee has eight players per team.
*
Rotation will be the same as regulation volleyball. The front line
will rotate to the right, and the back line will rotate to the
left (clockwise).
*
In Cherokee volleyball, the right to serve first will be
determined by a volley. The ball is thrown up and must be hit back
and forth at least 3 times before the serve is awarded to the
winning team.
CHEROKEE VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE
GRADES 9-10
RULES (continued)
*
The game begins with a serve. The position of the player serving
is the player in the back right corner. The serve can be taken
from anywhere behind the end line.
*
A service fault (foul) occurs when:
*
the server steps on or over the end line
*
the ball goes into or passes under the net
*
the ball touches a serving team member before it clears the
net
*
the ball lands outside the boundaries of the court
The server continues to serve until a fault occurs by the serving team
In 2003 the National High School Federation followed the worldwide
movement to Rally Scoring. All New Jersey high school competitions (as
well as NCAA and international competitions) adopted the following
rule changes to faults and scoring:
*
A point is awarded at the end of each rally. If the serving team
wins the rally they are awarded a point and keep the serve. If the
receiving team wins the rally (including a service fault) they are
awarded a point, side out and the serve.
*
A let serve (a serve that hits the net and goes over and into the
opposing team’s court) is now a legal serve.
*
In a regulation game and at Cherokee, play continues until one
team gets 25 points with at least a 2-point lead.
All other rules for scoring and faults remain the same. The team
rotates after they receive the ball following a point and side out
(for winning a rally).
These team faults (fouls) result in a point for the serving team if
they are committed by the receiving team or a loss of serve (SIDE OUT)
and a point for the receiving team if the serving team commits the
infraction:
1.
The ball hits the floor.
2.
A team hits the ball more than three times in a row (not counting
a block at the net).
3.
A player hits the ball more than once in a row (double hit).
4.
The ball touches a player below the waist.
5.
An opponent reaches under the net and touches the ball.
6.
A player touches the net or standards.
7.
A player crosses the centerline to play the ball.
8.
The ball is hit out of bounds.
9.
A team is out of position.
10.
The ball hits the ceiling
11.
A player holds the ball momentarily in their palm or open hand (carry).
CHEROKEE VOLLEYBALL STUDY GUIDE
GRADES 9-10
BASIC SKILLS and STRATEGIES
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The overhand serve is the best offensive weapon. It is a faster and
harder serve than other types of serves. When attempting this serve,
the ball should be tossed two to three feet above and in front of the
server’s hand. Both the overhand/underhand serves require a staggered
stance with the non-dominant foot forward. The underhand serve is the
easiest to learn. However, the most important aspect of the serve is
the placement of the ball. A serve to the back corners of the court
generally causes the receiving team the greatest difficulty. When
receiving a serve, coordination and quickness are the most important
physical aspect.
A forearm pass or bump is performed when a player hits the ball
underhand off of their lower arms. This is the best method for playing
the ball when it drops below the chest.
The overhand pass or set is the most frequent technique used to set
the ball for a spike. In executing the overhand pass, the ball should
be contacted 6-8 inches above the forehead.
The attack pattern of play is bump-set-spike. When spiking, the most
important factor to consider is the timing of the moving ball. A
two-foot take off and open hand are recommended for successful
spiking. In Cherokee volleyball, only front row players are allowed to
spike
TERMINOLOGY
Ace a non-returnable serve.
Back Set a set made over the head and back of the setter.
Block defensive play at the net with hands over the head.
Bump another term used for the forearm pass.
Carry when the ball rests momentarily on one or both hands.
Dig a defensive saving skill using the forearm(s), fist or hand.
Dink a one-handed, soft hit into the opponent’s court using the
fingertips.
Floater a serve that is softly hit with no spin that “floats” or
wobbles in flight.
Foul an infraction of the rules.
Kill a non-returnable hit by a player.
Let Serve a legal serve that touches the net as it goes over and lands
in bounds.
Point when a receiving team violates a rule or hits the ball out.
Rally Scoring scoring system where a point is awarded at the end of
each rally.
Set another name for the overhand pass.
Side out when the serving team violates a rule or hits the ball out.
Spike a forcibly hit ball with one hand in an overhand motion.
COURT
60 feet by 30 feet
Net- 32 feet long by 3 feet wide; 7 feet 4 inches from the floor to
the top of net.