Grade 8 Module 1 Unit 2 Lesson 7 MidUnit

Grade 8 Module 1 Unit 2 Lesson 7 MidUnit

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Grade 8: Module 1: Unit 2: Lesson 7
Mid-Unit Assessment:
Analyzing an Informational Text about a Refugee Experience
Grade 8: Module 1: Unit 2: Lesson 7
Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a Refugee
Experience
Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on NYSP12 ELA CCLS)
I can cite text-based evidence that provides the strongest support for
an analysis of literary text. (RI.8.1)
I can objectively summarize informational text. (RI.8.2)
I can analyze the connections and distinctions between individuals,
ideas, or events in a text. (RI.8.3)
I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in text (figurative,
connotative, and technical meanings). (RI.8.4)
I can use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown
words or phrases. (L.8.4)
I can use evidence from informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research. (W.8.9)
Supporting Learning Targets
Ongoing Assessment
*
I can identify the strongest evidence in the speech by Til Gurung
that helps me explain why refugees leave their home.
*
I can identify the strongest evidence in the speech by Til Gurung
that helps me explain challenges refugees face in their new
country.
*
I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words based on context
clues.
*
I can cite evidence from the text to support analysis of an
informational text.
*
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a
Refugee Experience (RI.8.1, RI.8.2, RI.8.3, RI.8.4a, L.8.4, and
W.8.9)
Agenda
Teaching Notes
1.
Opening
A.
Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)
2.
Work Time
A.
Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a
Refugee Experience (40 minutes)
3.
Closing and Assessment
A.
Debrief (3 minutes)
4.
Homework
A.
Complete a first read of pages 196-212. Take notes (in your
journal) using the Structured Notes graphic organizer.
*
During today’s assessment, students independently read an
unfamiliar informational text about a refugee experience and
answer literal and inferential text-dependent questions, as well
as questions that assess students’ ability to determine word
meaning based on context clues (L.8.4). Students also answer three
constructed-response questions that require evidence from the text
to support their answers. The last one is similar to the
QuickWrites with which student are already familiar (W.8.9).
*
Consider using the NYS 2-point rubric to assess students’ short
constructed responses on this assessment. See Unit 1, Lesson 5
supporting materials.
*
Post: Learning targets.
Lesson Vocabulary
Materials
Do not preview vocabulary for today’s assessment.
*
Til Gurung’s speech from the Refugee Transitions’ “World of
Difference Benefit Luncheon” (one per student)(for Mid-Unit
Assessment)
*
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a
Refugee Experience (one per student)
*
Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a
Refugee Experience (Answers and Sample Responses for Teacher
Reference)
*
Extension Question (optional)
*
Extension Question (Answers for Teacher Reference)
*
Optional: NYS 2-point rubric (from Unit 1, Lesson 5; see Teaching
Notes above)
Opening
Meeting Students’ Needs
A. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes)
*
Read aloud the first two learning targets to students.
*
Remind students that these learning targets should be familiar to
them since they have been practicing these skills in the past
several lessons.
Work Time
Meeting Students’ Needs
A. Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a
Refugee Experience (40 minutes)
*
Remind students that they have been reading informational texts on
different refugee experiences. They have been collecting details
from each text to help them understand why refugees leave home,
the challenges they face in their new home, and some common themes
among different refugee experiences. Share with students that they
will show that they know how to do this on their own in this
assessment.
*
Arrange student seating to allow for an assessment-conducive
arrangement where students independently think, read, and write.
Encourage students by telling them that they have been working
very hard at reading closely and today you want them to show what
they have learned about word choice and tone in informational and
fiction text.
*
Distribute Til Gurung’s speech from the Refugee Transitions’
“World of Difference Benefit Luncheon” and the Mid-Unit 2
Assessment: Analyzing an Informational Text about a Refugee
Experience. Read aloud through the directions.
*
Address any clarifying questions. Invite students to begin.
Circulate to observe but not support; this is students’
opportunity to independently apply the skills they have been
learning.
*
If students finish early, encourage them to complete the extension
question for extra credit.
*
Collect the assessment.
*
On-demand assessments give the teacher valuable information about
skills that students have mastered or those that still need to be
developed.
*
ELLs and other students may benefit from extended time, a
bilingual glossary or dictionary, and a separate testing location.
Closing and Assessment
Meeting Students’ Needs
A. Debrief (3 minutes)
*
Talk with students about the work they have done in this first
unit, reading closely in the novel and with challenging
informational text. Remind them that they are getting better at
collecting details and evidence from texts.
Homework
Meeting Students’ Needs
*
Complete a first read of pages 196–212. Take notes (in your
journal) using the Structured Notes graphic organizer. Focus on
the strongest evidence that reveals how Ha is being turned “inside
out” (the challenges Ha faces and her dynamic character), plus
vocabulary that helps you understand her challenges and responses.
*
Vocabulary can be a source of difficulty for readers who struggle.
Provide a brief list with explanations of the challenging
vocabulary words from the reading homework. Do this only for
students who need this support.
*
Most important is to provide words that cannot be easily
determined from context. There are few of these in the novel. On
pages 196–212, these words might include the following: echoes
(repeats) (page 196), strained (tense) (page 203), hoists (lifts)
(page 209).
Grade 8: Module 1: Unit 2: Lesson 7
Supporting Materials

Used by permission from Refugee Transitions.
Name:
Date:
Directions:
Read the speech by Til Gurung once for gist.
Read the questions below and think about them.
Reread the text with the questions in mind. Look for the strongest
evidence.
Write your answers, using specific evidence from the text to support
your thinking.
1.
In the chart below, identify what Gurung’s life was like before
and after arriving in the United States, using the strongest
evidence from the text.
Summary Statement
Strongest evidence (at least two quotes from the text)
Before
After
2. Part 1:
The author states, “We had no choice but to flee to Nepal to save our
lives.” In your opinion, which statement below most strongly supports
this quote?
a.
The Bhutanese did not accept those with Nepali heritage and began
to punish them in a number of ways.
b. The Nepali did not fit in in Bhutan and felt threatened by the
Bhutanese.
Part 2:
Explain why you chose this statement as the strongest by using details
from the article.
3. Why does Gurung help refugees transition to life in the United
States? Cite two details from the text to support your answer.
4. Part 1:
Based on context clues, what do you think the phrase ethnic cleansing
might mean?
Part 2: What sentence from the speech best helped you figure out the
meaning of the phrase ethnic cleansing?
a. “Though we lived peacefully in Bhutan for many years, as our
community grew, the Bhutanese government began to feel threatened.”
b. “Many of us were tortured and imprisoned.”
c. “We had no choice but to flee to Nepal to save our lives.”
d. “After twenty years in the Nepali refugee camps, we saw that there
was no possibility of returning home.”
Part 3: Why does Gurung use the phrase “ethnic cleansing” instead of
another term?
5. Based on the entire speech, which of the following excerpts best
reflects the author’s central idea?
a. “I help explain important documents and laws to my community
members, help interpret at parent teacher conferences and medical
appointments, teach them about home safety, where to find our cultural
foods in Oakland, how to use the bus, and how to drive.”
b. “After twenty years in the Nepali refugee camps, we saw that there
was no possibility of returning home.”
c. “But here in the United States, my community continues to
struggle.”
d. “By providing this language training and other support services
through the Community Navigators like myself, Refugee Transitions is
filling a real need in our community.”
6. QuickWrite: Based on the text, what are some of the problems
refugees will have if Refugee Transitions loses
funding or goes out of business?
Your QuickWrite should meet the following criteria:
*
Answer the prompt completely
*
Provide relevant and complete evidence
*
Paragraph includes the following:
* A focus statement
* At least three pieces of specific evidence from the text
* For each piece of evidence, an analysis or explanation: What does
this evidence mean?
* A concluding sentence
It is important that you select the strongest evidence that you have
(rather than all of the evidence that you have) for the paragraph.
Review: In our last lesson, you worked with “sentence strips” and
“quote cards” to identify evidence from the article on the Bosnian
teens that related to the information from “Refugees: Who, Where,
Why.” The three claims are listed again for you below.
Challenge: Read each of the claims from “Refugees: Who, Where, Why.”
Below each claim, identify the strongest evidence from Til Gurung’s
speech that supports the claim. Explain your thinking.
1.
“Today, more than 14 million men, women, and children have been
forced to flee their homes, towns, and countries because they are
afraid to stay.”
2.
“Some refugees cannot return home, nor can they stay in their
country of asylum. They must resettle in a new country.”
3.
“Perceptions of unfairness, such as unequal treatment or denial of
rights based on race, religion, economic status, or political
thought, instigate war; so does unequal access to land, food,
water, and other necessary resources.”
Directions:
Read the speech by Til Gurung once for gist.
Read the questions below and think about them.
Reread the text with the questions in mind. Look for the strongest
evidence.
Write your answers, using specific evidence from the text to support
your thinking.
1. In the chart below, identify what Gurung’s life was like before and
after arriving in the United States, using the
strongest evidence from the text.
Summary Statement
Strongest evidence (at least two quotes from the text)
Before
His life was in danger in Bhutan because of the government, so he went
to live in the refugee camps in Nepal.
“Thus, they [the government]
initiated an ethnic cleansing program to force us from our homes.”
“We suffered in our
country Bhutan because we did not speak the language or practice the
religion or
culture of the royal family. Many of us were tortured and imprisoned.”
Summary Statement
Strongest evidence (at least two quotes from the text)
After
He works for an organization that helps refugees learn to be
successful in the U.S.
“I am a Community Navigator Intern with Refugee Transitions, where I
help my community access important services and make a successful
transition into their lives in the United States.”
“I help explain
important documents and laws to my community members, help interpret
at parent teacher
conferences and medical appointments, teach them about home safety,
where
to find our cultural foods in Oakland, how to use the bus, and how to
drive.”
2. Part 1:
The author states, “We had no choice but to flee to Nepal to save our
lives.” In your opinion, which statement below most strongly supports
this quote?
a. The Bhutanese did not accept those with Nepali heritage and began
to punish them in a number of ways.
b. The Nepali did not fit in in Bhutan and felt threatened by the
Bhutanese.
Either choice could be correct based on the evidence chosen from the
text.
Look for students to justify their choice based on logical reasoning
in which they explain how the evidence supports their choice.
Part 2:
Explain why you chose this statement as the strongest by using details
from the article.
Choice A Sample Student Response:
The Bhutanese did not accept those with Nepali heritage and began to
punish them in a number of ways. Til Gurung explained that the
government did not accept his people, and an ethnic cleansing program
was started to punish them. For example, people were being forced from
their homes, and some were even tortured and killed. So, when the
author states, “We had no choice but to flee Nepal to save our lives,”
I believe it is because they were not accepted by the government and
they were being punished and even killed.
Choice B Sample Student Response:
The Nepali did not fit in in Bhutan and felt threatened by the
Bhutanese. In the speech, Til Gurung explains that the Bhutanese did
not blend in with the other people of Nepal. For example, they did not
speak the same language, have the same religion, or have the same
culture as the royal family. He also says, “the Bhutanese government
began to feel threatened” because the Nepali population was growing
and they were so different from the Bhutanese. So when the author
states, “We had no choice but to flee Nepal to save our lives,” I
believe it is because the Nepali did not fit in and they felt
threatened by the government.
3. Why does Gurung help refugees transition to life in the United
States? Cite two details from the text to support your answer.
Gurung helps refugees transition to life in the U.S. because it is
important for refugees to have support if they are going to make a
successful life. He says, “Many of us do not speak English, and lack
of education makes it even more difficult for us to learn the language
here.” He feels that he is helping to fill “a real need in our
community” by teaching English and helping refugees with all the
things he helps them with, such as legal documents, home safety, and
where to find cultural foods.
4. Part 1:
Based on context clues, what do you think the phrase ethnic cleansing
might mean?
Ethnic cleansing means a program of imprisoning or torturing people
based on the ethnic group they belong to, like the Nepali living in
Bhutan.
Part 2: What sentence from the speech best helped you figure out the
meaning of the phrase ethnic cleansing?
a. “Though we lived peacefully in Bhutan for many years, as our
community grew, the Bhutanese government began to feel threatened.”
b. “Many of us were tortured and imprisoned.”
c. “We had no choice but to flee to Nepal to save our lives.”
d. “After twenty years in the Nepali refugee camps, we saw that there
was no possibility of returning
home.”
Part 3: Why does Gurung use the phrase “ethnic cleansing” instead of
another term?
Gurung uses the term “ethnic cleansing” because it is a term his
persecutors used to make the mass killing and murder sound not as
horrible. He also may be using this term for this audience since he is
giving a speech and wants to sound sort of polite.
5. Based on the entire speech, which of the following excerpts best
reflects the author’s central idea?
a. “I help explain important documents and laws to my community
members, help interpret at parent teacher conferences and medical
appointments, teach them about home safety, where to find our cultural
foods in Oakland, how to use the bus, and how to drive.”
b. “After twenty years in the Nepali refugee camps, we saw that there
was no possibility of returning home.”
c. “But here in the United States, my community continues to
struggle.”
d. “By providing this language training and other support services
through the Community Navigators like myself, Refugee Transitions is
filling a real need in our community.”
6. QuickWrite: Based on the text, what are some of the problems
refugees will have if Refugee Transitions loses funding or goes out of
business?
If Refugee Transitions loses funding or goes out of business, it will
have negative consequences for many refugees. Til Gurung, who works
for Refugee Transitions, helps refugees with important things that
help refugees live a normal life. For example, if Refugee Transitions
closes, they might not have the help they need to read “important
legal documents” like a will if someone dies, or something from their
landlord or bank. This could mean they could get sick or lose their
home. Refugees might also be more isolated if they don’t speak
English. Learning the English is important to living a normal life in
America. He said that “just taking the bus and going to the store was
a challenge” for his wife until she learned English. It’s hard to feel
connected to a community if you can’t understand people or get around.
If this center closes, refugees might not be able to get jobs that pay
as much if they don’t have “classes and tutoring” that help them get
ahead in life. If Refugee Transitions loses its funding or goes out of
business, refugees will have to struggle on their own and it will be
hard for them to get used to life in America.
1.
“Today, more than 14 million men, women, and children have been
forced to flee their homes, towns, and countries because they are
afraid to stay.”
Til Gurung says the Nepali in Bhutan had no choice but to leave
their homes because they feared for their safety, which
illustrates the idea that people are forced to flee their homes
and countries because they are afraid to stay.
2.
“Some refugees cannot return home, nor can they stay in their
country of asylum. They must resettle in a new country.”
Gurung explains that when things got bad in Bhutan, his people
fled to Nepal. After 20 years in refugee camps, they knew they
would never get to return home, so they went to the U.S. to start
a new life, confirming this idea that some refugees can’t return
home or stay in their country of asylum.
3.
“Perceptions of unfairness, such as unequal treatment or denial of
rights based on race, religion, economic status, or political
thought, instigate war; so does unequal access to land, food,
water, and other necessary resources.”
Gurung explains that the Nepali living in Bhutan did not practice the
same religion or have the same culture as the Bhutanese, so they were
treated differently—they were put in jail, tortured, and killed.
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NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum • G8:M1:U2:L7 • June 2014 • 4