COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES Brussels SEC(2009) 712/2 COMMISSION

COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES Brussels SEC(2009) 712/2 COMMISSION

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COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES
Brussels,
SEC(2009) 712/2
COMMISSION STAFF WORKING DOCUMENT
Accompanying the
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION
TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND
SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS
concerning the
European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region
ACTION PLAN
{COM(2009) 248}
{SEC(2009) 702}
{SEC(2009) 703}
February 2013 VERSION
Action Plan
for the
European Union Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region
An integrated framework that allows the European Union and Member
States to identify needs and match them to the available resources by
coordinating of appropriate policies, thus enabling the Baltic Sea
Region to achieve a sustainable environment and optimal economic and
social development.
Table of Contents
COMMISSION STAFF WORKING DOCUMENT 1
February 2013 VERSION 1
Action Plan 2
Table of Contents 3
Abbreviations 14
INTRODUCTION 17
Governance of the Strategy 20
Roles and responsibilities of the main stakeholders of the EUSBSR 20
The tasks of the European Commission include: 20
The tasks of the High-Level Group include: 21
The tasks of the Member State include: 21
The tasks of the national contact point include: 22
The tasks of the priority area/horizontal action focal point include:
22
The tasks of the priority area coordinator include: 23
The tasks of the horizontal action leader include: 24
The tasks of the flagship project leader include: 24
The tasks of a body in charge of implementing a programme/financial
instrument include: 25
Updating the Action Plan 25
The governance process 25
The following section describes in detail the process of becoming a
flagship project. 26
Flagship projects: functions and labelling process 26
The label of a flagship project can be given to a project that fulfils
the following criteria: 27
Procedure to become a flagship project 27
Funding Issues 29
The alignment of funding 30
Communicating the EUSBSR – Let’s talk about results 32
Objectives and sub-objectives of the Strategy 33
Save the Sea 33
Sub-objective: Clear water in the sea 35
The sustainable research framework established through BONUS should be
used to support efforts. 36
Sub-objective: Rich and healthy wildlife 36
Sub-objective: Clean and safe shipping 37
Sub-objective: Better cooperation 38
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Save the Sea’ 39
Connect the Region 41
Sub-objective: Good transport conditions 42
Sub-objective: Reliable energy markets 42
Sub-objective: Connecting people in the region 43
Sub-objective: Better cooperation in fighting cross-border crime 44
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Connect the Region’ 45
Increase Prosperity 46
Sub-objective: EUSBSR as a frontrunner for deepening and fulfilling
the single market 47
Sub-objective: EUSBSR contributing to the implementation of Europe
2020 Strategy 48
Sub-objective: Improved global competitiveness of the Baltic Sea
Region 50
Sub-objective: Climate change adaptation, risk prevention and
management 52
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Increase Prosperity’ 54
Priority Areas 58
PA Agri – Reinforcing sustainability of agriculture, forestry and
fisheries 58
Targets and indicators 60
Action: Develop sustainable strategies for wood 61
Flagship projects 61
Action: Enhance the combined effects of the rural development
programmes 62
Flagship projects 62
Flagship projects 63
Action: Animal health and disease control 63
Flagship projects 63
Flagship projects 64
Flagship projects 65
Action: Recycling of nutrients 65
Flagship projects 66
PA Bio – Preserving natural zones and biodiversity, including
fisheries 67
Targets and indicators 68
Actions and flagship projects 69
Flagship projects 69
Action: Reduce the negative effects of fishing on the Baltic ecosystem
69
Flagship projects 70
PA Crime – Fighting cross-border crime 72
Targets and indicators 73
Actions and flagship projects 74
Action: Implementation of the BSTF OPC Regional Strategy 2010–2014 74
Potential flagship projects 75
Action: Combatting trafficking in human beings 75
Flagship projects 76
Potential flagship projects 77
PA Culture – Developing and promoting the common culture and cultural
identity 78
Targets and indicators 79
Actions and flagship projects 79
Action: Joint promotion and presentation of BSR culture and cultural
heritage 79
Flagship projects 80
Potential flagship projects 80
Action: Cooperation on cultural heritage 81
Action: Joint promotion and presentation of BSR creative industries 81
Potential flagship projects 81
Action: Developing a common BSR cultural identity 82
Flagship projects 83
Action: Developing an efficient framework for BSR cultural cooperation
83
Potential flagship projects 83
PA Education – Developing innovative education and youth 85
Targets and indicators 86
Actions and flagship projects 87
Action: Develop new methods for training entrepreneurship and
innovation 87
Flagship projects 87
Action: To meet the challenge of demographic changes and to combat
youth unemployment 88
Flagship projects 88
Potential flagship projects 88
Flagship projects 89
Potential flagship projects 89
Potential flagship projects 90
Flagship projects 90
Action: Social inclusion 91
Flagship projects 91
Potential flagship projects 91
PA Energy – Improving the access to, and the efficiency and security
of the energy markets 92
Targets and indicators 93
Actions and flagship projects 94
Action: Towards a well-functioning energy market 94
Flagship projects 95
Potential flagship projects 96
Action: Increase the use of renewable energy sources and promote
energy efficiency 96
Flagship projects 96
Potential flagship projects 97
PA Hazards – Reducing the use and impact of hazardous substances 98
Natural platforms for cooperation for this priority area include
HELCOM. 99
Targets and indicators 99
Actions and flagship projects 99
Action: Preventive actions 99
For example, promoting voluntary substitution of hazardous substances
and raising awareness. 100
Flagship projects 100
Action: Remediation and mitigation 100
Flagship projects 100
Action: Implementation of regulatory frameworks and conventions 101
Flagship projects 101
Action: Research and innovative management 101
Flagship projects 102
PA Health – Improving and promoting people’s health, including its
social aspects 103
Targets and indicators 105
Actions and flagship projects 105
Action: Contain the spread of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis 105
Flagship projects 105
Action: Fight health inequalities through the improvement of primary
healthcare 105
Flagship projects 105
Flagship projects 106
Potential flagship projects 106
Note: 107
PA Innovation – Exploiting the full potential of the region in
research and innovation 108
This priority area is closely linked to priority are ‘SME’. 108
Targets and indicators 109
Actions and flagship projects 110
Action: Establish a common Baltic Sea region innovation strategy 110
Flagship projects 110
PA Internal Market – Removing hindrances to the internal market 113
Targets and indicators 115
Actions and flagship projects 115
Action: Open up the public sector to competition 115
Flagship projects 115
Action: Remove remaining unjustified barriers to the cross-border
provision of services 116
Flagship projects 116
Action: Make the EU internal market work on the ground for the Baltic
Sea Region 117
Flagship projects 117
PA Nutri – Reducing nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels
119
Targets and indicators 120
Actions and flagship projects 121
Action: Improving waste water treatment 121
Flagship projects 121
Action: Managing nutrients more efficiently 122
Flagship projects 122
Action: Facilitate cross-sectoral policy-oriented dialogue 122
Flagship projects 123
Action: Investigate cost-efficient nutrient reduction mechanisms 123
Flagship projects 123
Action: Cooperate with non-EU Member States 123
Flagship projects 123
Action: Improve nutrient load data 123
Flagship projects 124
PA Safe – To become a leading region in maritime safety and security
125
Targets and indicators 127
Actions and flagship projects 127
Policy discussions and alignment of policies 127
Flagship projects 128
Flagship projects 129
Action: Jointly apply surveillance tools 130
Flagship projects may be developed to implement this action. 130
Action: Winter navigation 130
Flagship projects 130
Flagship projects 131
Potential flagship projects 131
Flagship projects 131
More flagship projects may be developed to implement this action. 132
PA Secure – Protection from emergencies and accidents on land 133
Indicators and targets 134
Actions and flagship projects 135
Flagship projects 136
Proposal from the Commission for a flagship project 136
Action: Enhance a joint urban safety and prevention approach in the
Baltic Sea region 136
Potential flagship projects 136
Action: Foster dialogue and common approaches to civil protection in
the Baltic Sea region 137
Flagship projects 137
PA Ship – Becoming a model region for clean shipping 138
Policy discussions and alignment of policies 140
Actions and flagship projects 140
Action: Reduce ship pollution and develop shore-side facilities 140
Flagship projects 142
PA SME – Promote entrepreneurship and strengthen the growth of SMEs
145
Targets and indicators 146
Actions and flagship projects 147
Action: Building platforms for growth 147
Flagship projects 147
Action: Effective support for entrepreneurship and innovation 148
Flagship projects 148
Action: Going green 148
Flagship projects 148
Action: Global opportunities 149
Flagship projects 149
PA Tourism – Reinforcing cohesiveness of the macro-region through
tourism 150
Targets and indicators 151
Actions and flagship projects 152
Action: Facilitate networking and clustering of tourism stakeholders
152
Potential flagship projects 153
Action: Mobilise the full potential for sustainable tourism of the
Baltic Sea region 153
Flagship projects 153
Potential flagship projects 154
PA Transport – Improving internal and external transport links 155
Targets and indicators 156
Actions and flagship projects 157
Action: Cooperate on national transport policies and infrastructure
investments 157
Flagship projects 158
Action: Improve the connections with Russia and other EU neighbouring
countries 158
Flagship projects 159
Action: Facilitate efficient and sustainable Baltic passenger and
freight transport solutions 159
Flagship projects 159
Action: Increase the role of the Baltic Sea in the transport systems
of the region 160
Flagship projects 160
Horizontal Actions 161
HA Involve – Strengthening multi-level governance including involving
civil society, business and academia 161
Targets and indicators 162
Actions and flagship projects 162
Action: Definition and knowledge of MLG 162
Flagship projects 162
Flagship projects 163
Action: Communication and information 163
Flagship projects 163
Action: Involvement of pan-Baltic organisations 163
Flagship projects 164
Action: Inclusion of experts from NGOs in the preparation and
implementation of the EUSBSR 164
Action: Capacity building in supporting NGOs transnational cooperation
within the BSR 164
Action: National NGOs as a resource for involving civil society,
business and academia 164
Action: Integration of Community-Led Local Development (CLLD) to the
EUSBSR 164
Flagship projects 165
HA Neighbours – To increase the co-operation with neighbouring
countries to tackle joint challenges in the Baltic Sea region 166
Targets and indicators 167
Actions and flagship projects 167
Action: Promotion of higher education and professional networks with
innovative enterprises 167
Potential flagship projects 167
Action: Strengthening Environmental Cross-Border Competence in the
Baltic Sea Region 167
Potential flagship projects 167
Action: Fostering labour market related activities especially in the
cross-border context 168
Potential flagship projects 168
Action: Promoting youth and student exchanges and co-operation in the
Baltic Sea Region 169
Flagship projects 169
Action: Develop sustainable cross-border areas for tourism and
economic development 170
Flagship projects 170
Action: Development of Private-Public Partnerships (PPP) 171
Flagship projects 171
Action: Cultural heritage and creative industries 171
Flagship projects 172
Flagship projects 172
HA Promo – Boosting joint promotion and regional identity building
actions 175
Targets and indicators 176
Actions and flagship projects 177
Action: Boosting joint promotion of the region 177
Flagship projects 177
Action: Building regional identity 178
Flagship project 178
HA Spatial Planning – Encouraging the use of Maritime and Land-based
Spatial Planning in all Member States around the Baltic Sea and
develop a common approach for cross-border cooperation 179
Targets and indicators 180
Actions and flagship projects 181
Flagship project 181
HA Sustainable development and bio-economy 183
Targets and indicators 184
Actions and flagship projects 185
Action: ‘Green economy’ 185
Flagship projects 186
Potential flagship projects and activities: 187
Action: ‘Climate change and migitation’ 187
Flagship projects 187
Action: ‘Climate change adaptation’ 188
Annex I: Completed Flagship Projects 195
Annex II: Charting how Priority Areas and Horizontal Actions address
each Objective 201
Abbreviations
AIS
Automatic Identification Systems
B7
Baltic Islands
BaltMet
The Baltic Metropoles Network
BASREC
The Baltic Sea Region Energy Cooperation Initiative
BEMIP
The Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan
BOCTA
The Baltic Operational Crime Assessment
BSAP
HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan
BSLF
The Baltic Sea Labour Forum
BSR
The Baltic Sea region
BSRAC
Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council
BSRBCC
The Baltic Sea Region Border Control Cooperation
BSSSC
The Baltic Sea States Subregional Cooperation
BSTF
The Baltic Sea Tourism Forum
BSTF OPC
The Baltic Sea Task Force on Organised Crime in the Baltic Sea Region
BTO 2030
The Baltic Transport Outlook 2030
CBSS
The Council of the Baltic Sea States
CBSS TF-THB
Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings
CEF
Connecting Europe Facility
CF
Cohesion Fund
CFP
Common Fisheries Policy
CISE
Common Information Sharing Environment
CLLD
Community-Led Local Development
COSME
Programme for the competitiveness of enterprises and SMEs
DG ENERGY
Directorate-General for Energy
DG ENTR
Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry
DG ENV
Directorate-General for Environment
DG MARE
Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries
DG REGIO
Directorate General for Regional and Urban Policy
EAFRD
European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
ECoC
European Capitals of Culture
EEZ
Exclusive Economic zone
EFF
European Fisheries Fund
EGCC
The Expert Group for Cooperation on Children at Risk
EIAs
Environmental Impact Assessments
EIB
European Investment Bank
EMFF
European Maritime and Fisheries Fund
ERA
European Research Area
ERDF
European Regional Development Fund
ESF
European Social Fund
EU
European Union
EUSBSR
EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region
FDI
Foreign Direct Investment
FP7
The EU’s Seventh Framework Programme for Research
GDP
Gross domestic product
GES
Good Ecological Status
GT
Gross Tonnage
HA
Horizontal Action
HALs
Horizontal Action Leaders
HELCOM
The Helsinki Commission
HIV/AIDS
Human immunodeficiency virus / acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
HLG
High-Level Group
IALA
International Association of Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse
Authorities
ICES
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea
ICT
Information and communications technology
ICZM
Integrated Coastal Zone Management
IDU
Injecting Drug Users
IMO
International Maritime Organization
IPR
Intellectual Property Rights
ISUM
Integrated Sea Use Management
ITS
Intelligent Transport Systems
JASPERS
Joint Assistance to Support Projects in European Regions
LNG
Liquefied Natural Gas
LORC
Lindoe Offshore Renewables Centre
LRIT
Long Range Identification and Tracking of Ships
MLG
Multi-Level Governance
MSFD
Marine Strategy Framework Directive
MSP
Marine Spatial Planning
MSY
Maximum Sustainable Yield
NCC
National Coordination Centers
NCM
Nordic Council of Ministers
NCP(s)
National Contact Point(s)
NDEP
The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership
NDPC
Northern Dimension Partnership on Culture
NDPHS
The Northern Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social
Well-being
NDPTL
Northern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics
NECA
Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emission Control Areas
NGO
Non-governmental organization
NIB
Nordic Investment Bank
PA
Priority Area
PAC(s)
Priority Area Coordinators
PCBs
Polychlorinated biphenyls
PGR
Plant Genetic Resources
POPs
Persistent Organic Pollutants
PSSA
Particularly Sensitive Sea Area
RES
Renewable energy sources
SALAR
Swedish Association for Local and Regional Authorities
SCAR
The Standing Committee on Agricultural Research
SEBA
The South East Baltic Area
SECA
Sulphur Oxide (SOx) Emission Control Area
SELEC
Southeast European Law Enforcement Centre
SFM
Sustainable Forest Management
SMEs
Small and Medium Enterprises
SOGC
CBSS Senior Officials Group for Culture
TEN-E
Trans-European Energy Network
TEN-T
Trans-European Transport Network
UBC
Union of the Baltic Cities
VASAB
Visions and Strategies around the Baltic Sea
VET
Vocational Education and Training
VMS
Vessel Traffic Management Systems
WCO
World Customs Organisation
WFD
Water Framework Directive
WHO
World Health Organization
INTRODUCTION
============
In December 2007, the European Council issued its Presidency
Conclusions, inviting the European Commission to present an EU
Strategy for the Baltic Sea region no later than June 2009.1 Prior to
this, the European Parliament had called for a strategy to address the
urgent environmental challenges arising from the increasingly visible
degradation of the Baltic Sea. The Commission presented its
Communication on the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (EUSBSR) on
10 June 20092 alongside a detailed Action Plan prepared following
intensive consultation of Member States and stakeholders. The European
Council endorsed this approach – the EU’s first macro-regional
strategy in October 2009.3
Three years have now passed since implementing the EUSBSR. Based on
the experience gained so far, the Commission put forward a
Communication on 23 March 20124 specifying the three overall
objectives for the Strategy: ‘Save the Sea’, ‘Connect the Region’ and
‘Increase Prosperity’. The Communication also included concrete
proposals to set of measurable indicators and targets for each
objective, with the aim of facilitating monitoring, evaluation,
communication, and, most importantly, results. On 26 June 2012, the
General Affairs Council endorsed this Communication5 and took note of
the list of indicators and targets proposed by the task force of
Member State and Commission representatives during spring 2012.
This document is the EUSBSR Action Plan updated to reflect the new
objectives, indicators and targets that are fully in line with and
contributes to the objectives Europe 2020 Strategy. It introduces
governance of the EUSBSR in line with the guidelines for roles and
responsibilities of the main implementing actors, which was also
agreed by the General Affairs Council on 26 June 2012. It also
presents the work structured by priority areas and horizontal actions.
The Action Plan may be updated regularly as the Baltic Sea region and
its context develops, following an agreement among the priority area
coordinators, horizontal action leaders, the Member States and the
European Commission.
Although this is a strategy of the European Union (EU), it is clear
that many of the issues can only be addressed in constructive
cooperation with our external partners in the region, in particular
Russia. However, the Strategy cannot dictate action to third parties.
Instead, it indicates issues on which cooperation is desirable and
proposes platforms to this discussion and cooperation. As the European
Council conclusions noted, the Northern Dimension, a common policy of
the EU, Russia, Norway and Iceland, provides the basis for these
external aspects of the Strategy. Other fora are also useful, such as
the EU-Russia common spaces6 and international bodies, for instance
the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS), the Nordic Council of
Ministers or the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). This cooperation is
without prejudice to the decision-making mechanisms of these
respective bodies.
A key factor of success for the Strategy is the integrated and
coordinated governance of the Baltic Sea region, between sectors of
society as well as between regional and local authorities in the
respective countries.7 Without such integration, the targets will be
difficult to achieve. The Strategy itself is particularly important in
this respect as it provides the only context within which all policies
relevant to the health and prosperity of the region are addressed. Its
overall success will depend on the degree to which the Strategy is
given weight and attention from the highest political level in the
region.
Successful implementation of the Strategy requires also the adoption
of a gender perspective in the governance system and the Action Plan.
Equality between men and women is a core value of the European Union.
At the same time, economic and business benefits can be gained from
enhancing gender equality. In order to achieve the objectives of the
EUSBSR the contribution and talents of both women and men should be
fully used.
Specifically, this Action Plan comprises 17 priority areas and 5
horizontal actions, which represent the main areas where the EUSBSR
can contribute to improvements, either by tackling the main challenges
or by seising key opportunities. Typically, one Member State
coordinates each priority area or horizontal action, and they work on
implementation in close contact with the Commission and all
stakeholders, i.e. other Member States, regional and local
authorities, inter-governmental and non-governmental bodies. Other
bodies may, also be nominated to coordinate an area or action. They
need to ensure that the Action Plan is consistent with all EU
policies, and in particular Europe 2020 Strategy as well as the
Integrated Maritime Policy, with its objectives for blue growth and
the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) objective to reach good
environmental status by 2020.
The priority areas are organised according to the three overall
objectives of the Strategy, and one horizontal section. This
distinction is for ease of analysis, but every objective covers a wide
range of policies and has impacts on the other objectives: they are
interlinked and interdependent. Each priority area and horizontal
action starts with a presentation of the issue providing background
information on the topic. Then, specific indicators and targets for
the area in question are set.
By way of example, climate change will be adequately included as a
cross-cutting horizontal consideration in the implementation of the
Action Plan’s objectives, sub-objectives, priority areas, horizontal
actions and flagship projects.
To translate this into results, there are detailed actions and
flagship projects. Actions represent the main steps that are needed to
achieve the agreed indicators and targets for that particular area,
while flagship projects detail how to achieve (part of) the desired
outcome. Importantly, flagship projects should all have a lead partner
and a deadline for implementation. In some cases, actions and/or
flagship projects might require a change in the policy thrust or
(rarely) national legislation of the Member States in the Baltic Sea
region. In others, they require financing which could be provided by
private or public funding (EU, national, regional or local funds). All
actions and projects should be understood without prejudice to the
existing exclusive Community competences.
In a number of cases, the objective of the actions and flagship
projects is to highlight areas of activity that are ongoing within the
EU system or in other international frameworks, but which require
greater coordination within the Baltic Sea region and consistent
funding strategies to be implemented successfully. The Strategy
provides a unique opportunity to do this. Work on the Action Plan
should be carried out in close coordination with any such on-going
developments (in particular new regulations), including at EU level,
to ensure coherence and efficiency.
The lingering impact of the economic crisis affects the context in
which this Action Plan needs to be implemented. There is a
less-favourable climate for investment, affecting both public sectors
and private business generally. This makes it all the more essential
that the EUSBSR allows the partners in the region to take a longer
perspective, recognising that when this crisis has passed the regions
that have best prepared will be those best equipped to take advantage
of the new opportunities and innovations.
The report ‘Counter Currents: Scenarios for the Baltic Sea 2030’ was
published in August 2012 as the result of an extensive
multi-stakeholder consultation that included several members of the
European Commission and EU Member States. It provides a useful context
in which to take that longer-term perspective on how the commitments
we make today will impact the future of the Baltic Sea, 10-20 years
hence.
Governance of the Strategy
==========================
Roles and responsibilities of the main stakeholders of the EUSBSR
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Further to the Commission recommendations in the report published on
22 June 2011, in the Communication of 23 March 2012, and the Council
Conclusions adopted on 26 October 2009, 15 November 2011 and 26 June
2012, and as a result of the works of the taskforce set-up in June
2011, the roles and responsibilities of the main stakeholders of the
Strategy have been defined as follows. There is a broad consensus that
they should constitute the minimum activity that each implementing
stakeholder concerned should undertake. Although not mentioned below,
it is important that stakeholders at local and regional level are
involved, when relevant.
The tasks of the European Commission include:
1.
Playing a leading role in strategic coordination of the key
delivery stages of the EUSBSR.
2.
Taking the EUSBSR into account in relevant policy initiatives and
programmes planning.
3.
Promoting and facilitating the involvement of stakeholders from
all levels of the entire macro-region and supporting them
implement the EUSBSR.
4.
Encouraging dialogue and cooperation with stakeholders from other
interested Baltic Sea region states.
5.
Facilitating implementation of the EUSBSR in cooperation with the
Member States (i.e. national contact points, line ministries,
bodies in charge of implementing programmes/financial instruments,
priority area coordinators, horizontal action leaders) by:
a.
closely aligning EU, national and regional policies and
strategies with the EUSBSR;
b.
supporting alignment of programmes/financial instruments with
the EUSBSR objectives;
c.
identifying and addressing obstacles to the effective
implementation of the EUSBSR;
d.
disseminating information, best practices and lessons learned in
implementing the EUSBSR;
e.
Ensuring adequate internal capacity to implement the EUSBSR.
6.
Consulting on a regular basis with the Member States, inter alia
through the High-Level Group.
7.
Evaluating and reporting on the progress made in implementing the
EUSBSR and the results achieved.
8.
Whenever appropriate, in dialogue with priority area coordinators,
horizontal action leaders and national contact points review, and
update the EUSBSR and Action Plan. Seek endorsement from the
Council or respectively the High-Level Group on the proposed
amendments.
The tasks of the High-Level Group include:
1.
Giving advice to the European Commission on the EUSBSR and its
implementation.
2.
Providing opinions on the review and updates of the EUSBSR and
Action Plan.
3.
Proposing actions to be taken by the European Commission and the
Member States to strengthen the EUSBSR implementation:
a.
contributing to the implementation of the Council Conclusions
on the review of the EUSBSR;
b.
identifying and addressing obstacles to the effective
implementation of the EUSBSR;
c.
proposing actions to promote a macro-regional approach in
developing new policies and aligning of programmes/financial
instruments.
The tasks of the Member State8 include:
1.
Ensuring that the EUSBSR is implemented and has continuous
political commitment to it:
a.
intensifying actions further to enhance existing political
support for the implementation of the EUSBSR at all levels
(EU, national, regional and local), particularly by making the
EUSBSR a reference point for all adequate fora;
b.
recognising the need to include the EUSBSR on the agenda of
the Council in its different formations as and when
appropriate to promote effective involvement of and closer
links to relevant EU policies in the implementation of the
EUSBSR;
2.
Ensuring that national and regional strategic planning, existing
policies, programmes and financial instruments is in line with the
EUSBSR by:
a.
coordinating and integrating relevant policies with the
EUSBSR;
b.
inviting line ministries and other relevant authorities to
mobilise programmes/financial instruments to support the
implementation of the EUSBSR.
3.
Supporting the role of national contact point in national
coordination of the EUSBSR, and the priority area coordinator(s)
and horizontal action leader(s) in thematic and transnational
implementation of the EUSBSR by:
a.
appointing a national contact point and supporting in fulfil
its tasks;
b.
setting up a national coordination body to boost the
effectiveness, synergy and sustainability of the results
achieved;
c.
assuming responsibility for coordinating the priority area(s)
concerned;
d.
appointing priority area coordinator(s) and horizontal action
leader(s) and ensuring that there is adequate internal
capacity to fulfil the role;
e.
appointing priority area focal points and horizontal action
focal points9;
f.
maintaining adequate internal capacity implement the EUSBSR.
The tasks of the national contact point include:
1.
Seeking political support and commitment to implement the EUSBSR
in the home country.
2.
Cooperating with other EUSBSR national contact points to secure
coherence and exchange the best practices.
3.
Ensuring overall coordination of and support for the EUSBSR
implementation in the home country:
a.
ensuring information to, consultation with national
institutions regarding the EUSBSR and seeking their
involvement;
b.
facilitating the involvement of other relevant stakeholders;
c.
maintaining an ongoing policy dialogue and working with the
national coordination body to initiate operational action;
d.
encouraging dialogue between relevant programmes/financial
instruments and national stakeholders for the alignment of
resources;
e.
identifying the priority area focal points/horizontal action
focal points.
4.
Formulating and communicating national positions on the EUSBSR and
Action Plan.
5.
In close cooperation with the European Commission, priority area
coordinators and horizontal action leaders, participating in the
review and updating of the EUSBSR and Action Plan.
6.
Supporting priority area coordinator(s) and horizontal action
leader(s) in implementing the EUSBSR.
7.
Monitoring and, on the request of the European Commission,
reporting on the coordination activities taken in the
implementation of the EUSBSR.
8.
Encouraging the participation of relevant stakeholders from the
entire macro-region in the implementation of the EUSBSR.
9.
Promoting the visibility of the EUSBSR.
The tasks of the priority area/horizontal action focal point include:
The priority area focal points serve as a liaison at national level
for all matters regarding the priority area/horizontal action
concerned in the Baltic Sea region states that do not hold the
position of priority area coordinator for the priority area or
horizontal action leader for the horizontal action in question.10
1.
Functioning as a focal point for the priority area/horizontal
action in the home country by:
a.
participating in national coordination regarding the EUSBSR;
b.
providing information on the priority area/horizontal action
to authorities or the public, whenever requested;
c.
identifying relevant contact persons in the home country for
priority area/horizontal action activities and flagship
projects;
d.
assisting the priority area coordinator(s)/horizontal action
leaders to communicate and giving visibility to the priority
area/horizontal action;
e.
ensuring that decisions on the priority area/horizontal action
are communicated to the relevant stakeholders.
2.
Liaising regularly with the priority area
coordinator(s)/horizontal action leaders in order to:
a.
contribute to policy discussion within the priority
area/horizontal action concerned;
b.
attend relevant activities, e.g. steering committees, meetings
and conferences, of the priority area/horizontal action; and
ensure continuous EU relevance in areas/actions not
exclusively coordinated by Member States;
c.
provide information on activities and projects in the home
country of relevance to the priority area/horizontal action;
d.
convey positions to the priority area/horizontal action; and
ensure they are nationally consolidated among the authorities
and stakeholders concerned.
The tasks of the priority area coordinator include:
Facilitating the involvement of and cooperation with relevant
stakeholders from the entire macro-region and in close cooperation
with those11:
1.
Implementing and following-up the priority area towards targets
and indicators defined. Whenever relevant, reviewing the set
indicators and targets set.
2.
Reviewing regularly the relevance of the priority area as
described in the Action Plan. Proposing necessary updates,
including the addition, modification or deletion of actions and
flagship projects to the European Commission.
3.
Facilitating policy discussions in the Baltic Sea region regarding
the priority area concerned.
4.
Facilitating the development and implementation of actions and
flagship projects defined under the priority area.
5.
Conveying the relevant results and recommendations of on-going and
completed flagship projects to the policy level.
6.
Ensuring communication and visibility of the priority area.
7.
Maintaining a dialogue with bodies in charge of implementing
programmes/financial instruments on alignment of funding for
implementation of the priority area and flagship projects.
8.
Liaising and cooperating with other priority area coordinators and
horizontal action leaders in order to ensure coherence and avoid
duplicate work on the EUSBSR implementation.
9.
Monitoring progress within the priority area and reporting on it.
The tasks of the horizontal action leader include:
Facilitating the involvement of and cooperation with relevant
stakeholders from the entire macro-region and in close cooperation
with those:12
1.
Implementing and following-up the horizontal action towards
targets and indicators defined. Whenever relevant, reviewing of
the indicators and targets set.
2.
Reviewing regularly the relevance of the horizontal action as
described in the Action Plan. Proposing necessary updates of the
horizontal action to the European Commission.
3.
Facilitating policy discussions in the Baltic Sea region regarding
the horizontal action concerned.
4.
Facilitating development and implementation of the horizontal
action concerned.
5.
When relevant, conveying relevant results and recommendations of
the horizontal action to the policy level.
6.
Ensuring communication and visibility of the horizontal action.
7.
Maintaining a dialogue with bodies in charge of implementing
programmes/financial instruments on alignment of funding for
implementation of the horizontal action.
8.
Liaising and cooperating with priority area coordinators and other
horizontal action leaders in order to ensure coherence and avoid
duplication work on the EUSBSR implementation.
9.
Monitoring progress within the horizontal action and reporting on
it.
The tasks of the flagship project leader include:
1.
Ensuring implementation of the flagship project.
2.
Liaising regularly with the respective priority area
coordinator(s)/horizontal action leader(s):
a.
taking actively part in the work of the respective priority
area/horizontal action, e.g. relevant meetings and
conferences;
b.
regularly monitoring and reporting on the progress of the
flagship project to the priority area
coordinator(s)/horizontal action leader(s);
3.
Promoting the flagship project results and ensure they are
sustainable. Supporting the priority area
coordinator(s)/horizontal action leader(s) in conveying relevant
flagship project results and recommendations to the policy
discussions and policy development in the Baltic Sea region.
4.
Establishing and maintaining cooperation with other relevant
flagship projects of the EUSBSR, in order to ensure consistency,
exchange information and avoid duplicate of work.
5.
Ensuring communication and visibility of the flagship project and
its results.
The tasks of a body in charge of implementing a programme/financial
instrument13 include:
Bodies in charge of implementing programmes/financial instruments are
encouraged, in all stages of the programme cycle, to closely cooperate
with the national contact points, priority area coordinators, priority
area focal points, horizontal action leaders, horizontal action focal
points and line ministries in the Member States for implementing the
EUSBSR.
In the implementation of the programmes/financial instruments:
1.
Contributing to macro-regional coordination and cooperation in
national and regional development strategies (territorial and
thematic) by ensuring the objectives of the programmes/financial
instruments are aligned with the objectives of the EUSBSR, in
order to facilitate consistency and synergies and the use of
available resources most effectively.
2.
Considering positively the creation of measures to support
projects that contribute to the EUSBSR objectives.
3.
Promoting, supporting and funding the implementation of joint and
coordinated projects to reach the EUSBSR objectives.
4.
Participating in and contributing to a continuous dialogue with
the main implementing stakeholders of the EUSBSR in order to
identify and work together in areas of mutual interest and
objectives, such as the Europe 2020 Strategy.
5.
Disseminating information to potential project applicants on the
opportunities offered by the programme/financial instrument to
implement the EUSBSR (see point 2).
In the reporting phase of the programme/financial instrument:
6.
Indicating and reporting on specific projects under
actions/measures/priorities of the programme that contribute to
the implementation of the EUSBSR objectives.
Updating the Action Plan
------------------------
The EUSBSR Action Plan adopted by the Commission in June 2009, of
which the Council took note in October 2009, has been extensively
discussed with Member States, stakeholders and the relevant services
in the Commission. Any amendments should therefore be made with
caution.
The governance process
Three general criteria apply:
1.
proposals for updates should be coordinated by the relevant
priority area coordinator(s) and horizontal action leader(s),
agreed upon with national contact points and communicated to the
Directorate General for Regional and Urban Policy;
2.
proposals for updates should be in line with Community policies;
3.
the Commission will decide on all updates and corrections after
consulting the High-Level Group of Member State officials, when
appropriate.
The Commission has developed a ‘typology of updates to the Action
Plan’ to serve as a general rule of thumb when evaluating proposals
for updates.
Broadly, the typology distinguishes between:
A.
Updates for the purpose of clarifying, correcting or ‘filling the
gaps’,
B.
Updates that propose to cover new ground or are required because
of a change in circumstances, and
C.
Updates proposing to move, significantly amend or delete flagship
projects. While proposals to move projects should generally to be
accepted, the other two types will be evaluated on a case-by-case
basis.
Type of updates to the Action Plan
Commission’s approach
1
Filling gaps
To be accepted
2
Clarifications, correction
To be accepted
3
Negotiated change
To be accepted
4
Change of circumstances
Generally to be accepted
5
Delete flagship project
Case-by-case evaluation
6
Modify flagship project
Case-by-case evaluation
7
Substance change
Case-by-case evaluation
8
Add flagship project
Case-by-case evaluation
9
Add flagship project not covering new ground or not of macro-regional
relevance
Generally not to be accepted
The following section describes in detail the process of becoming a
flagship project.
Flagship projects: functions and labelling process
--------------------------------------------------
The actions of the EUSBSR are implemented by means of flagship
projects. Flagship projects demonstrate the progress of the EUSBSR,
and may serve as pilot examples for desired action.
A flagship project is frequently the result of a policy discussion
within a priority area/horizontal action.
A flagship project fleshes out the ambition of a priority area in a
specified field of action.
A flagship project may, for example, develop key solutions, new
methodologies, practises or new forms of cooperation. Flagship
projects may also concern key investments of regional importance.
Once approved, a flagship project is listed in the Action Plan.
In terms of structure, a flagship project is either:
*
a single project or
*
a set of projects (a group) operating in the same field. The set
of projects may compile single projects; flagship projects and
linked projects, even if they are implemented under different
fields (topics or themes).
The label of a flagship project can be given to a project that fulfils
the following criteria:
1.
A flagship project must fulfil the following key criteria:
a.
it has a high macro-regional impact;
b.
it contributes to fulfilling the objectives, indicators and
targets of the EUSBSR;
c.
it is related to the implementation of one or more actions of
the priority area/horizontal action concerned.
2.
In general, a flagship project is also expected to:
a.
have a clear transnational dimension (cooperation between
and/or impact on at least three Baltic Sea region states
including at least two EU Baltic Sea region states if other
Baltic Sea region state (Russia and Norway) is involved);14
b.
be mature for implementation:
i.
can be implemented within a realistic timeframe;
ii.
has a clear financial and activity plan which e.g.
encompass setting aside resources for attending relevant
activities of the respective priority area/horizontal
action and the EUSBSR;
iii.
a partnership is established and a flagship project leader
is identified.
Priority area coordinator(s)/horizontal action leaders may decide on
specific criteria under their respective priority area/horizontal
action after consultation with national contact points and the
Directorate General for Regional and Urban Policy (DG REGIO).
Procedure to become a flagship project
Projects interested in obtaining the label of flagship project in the
EUSBSR are to undertake the following:
1.
identify under which the EUSBSR priority area/horizontal action
the proposed flagship project would fit;
2.
establish contact with the priority area coordinator(s) for the
priority area/horizontal action concerned;
3.
in order to assess the proposed flagship project, the priority
area coordinator/horizontal action leader may invite the proposed
project leader to attend a meeting of the priority area/horizontal
action;
4.
if the project proposal is supported, the priority area
coordinator/horizontal action leader, after consulting the main
stakeholders (national contact points, steering committee and/or
national focal points) make a recommendation to DG REGIO regarding
the project;
5.
DG REGIO considers the proposal and makes a recommendation to the
High-Level Group;
6.
the High-Level Group agrees on the flagship projects to be
included in the Action Plan.
A project can be listed as a flagship project in one priority
area/horizontal action only. If a project contributes to several
priority areas/horizontal actions, it may liaise with the other
relevant priority areas/horizontal actions.
A flagship project does not have the exclusive right to undertake
action in the priority area/horizontal action under which it is
listed. The priority area coordinator(s)/horizontal action leader(s)
may at any time accept more flagship projects in the same field.
Furthermore, by implementing the flagship project, its leader shall
fulfil the tasks of the flagship project. Leader vis-à-vis the EUSBSR
as specified under the tasks of flagship project leaders above.
Funding Issues
==============
The EUSBSR does not have its own financing. As it stated in the
Council Conclusions on the EUSBSR, adopted on 26 October 2009, the
Strategy ‘is financially neutral and relies on a coordinated approach,
synergetic effects and, on a more effective use of existing EU
instruments and funds, as well as other existing resources and
financial instruments’. According to the Commission Communication
(June 2009), the European Social Fund, European Regional Development
Fund, Cohesion Fund, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
and European Fisheries Fund are the key funding sources of the
Strategy. The study ‘Analysis of needs for financial instruments in
the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region’, carried out by SWECO in
October 2011 confirmed that ‘the implementation of most projects is to
a large extent dependent on EU Structural Funds. In particular
European Territorial Cooperation Programmes are widely used’. However,
the actions and projects under the Strategy and its Action Plan can be
funded by many other financial sources (7th Framework Programme, BONUS15
Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme, the LIFE
programme, Education and Culture programmes, etc.), as well as
national, regional, private sources. In the future actions and
projects in the transport, energy and ICT sectors may also become
eligible for funding by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF). In
addition, some projects (especially major ones) could benefit from the
support of international financial institutions such as the European
Investment Bank and the Nordic Investment Bank. In this respect,
JASPERS initiative plays also a significant role, in particular in the
transport, energy and environment sectors, including trans-border
projects. Thus the EUSBSR embodies the new concept of macro-regional
cooperation which is based on effective and more coordinated use of
existing funding sources, and the promotion of synergies and
complementarities.
An extensive overview of potential funding sources can be found at:
http://www.balticsea-region-strategy.eu/pages/funding-sources.
To facilitate implementation of the EUSBSR, at the initiative of the
European Parliament, EUR 2.5 million was earmarked in the 2011 EU
budget for activities mainly supporting the work of the priority area
coordinators, horizontal action leaders and flagship project leaders,
and to raise awareness of the Strategy. The European Parliament
included the same amount (EUR 2.5 million) to support the Strategy in
the 2012 EU budget. This financial assistance includes support to
promote a seed money initiative. Thus the EUSBSR Seed Money Facility
will be operational as of early 2013. This Facility focuses on the
preparation phase of project applications contributing to the
objectives of the Strategy. The preparation phase will, firstly,
enable networking activities aiming at building strategic partnerships
and exchange with the responsible priority area coordinators of the
EUSBSR Action Plan. Secondly, seed money shall cover the planning of
the ‘main stage’ project activities and the budget as well as
investigate potential future funding sources. It will be managed by
InvestitionsBank Schleswig-Holstein, which is also the managing
authority of the Baltic Sea Region programme for 2007–2013.
The alignment of funding
Given the importance of the EUSBSR for sustainable growth and
development of Baltic Sea region, its contribution to the objectives
of Europe 2020 Strategy, and the fact that the EUSBSR is based on the
effective use of existing funding sources, it is essential to align
national, regional and EU policies and financial resources with the
objectives of the Strategy. The Commission recommended to align the
Cohesion Policy and other funding sources in the region with the
objectives of the Strategy in the first progress report on the
implementation of the Strategy (June 2011). The Commission then
reiterated the importance of aligning the relevant existing and future
sources of funding with the objectives of the EUSBSR aiming to
maximising the impact of Strategy in its Communication of March 2012,
echoed in the Council Conclusions adopted in November 2011 and June
2012.
Major steps have been taken to support the macro-regional approach in
the financial framework 2014–2020. The legislative proposals for
Cohesion Policy during the 2014–2020 submitted by the Commission on 6
October 2011 require Member States to describe their approach to the
macro-regional strategies and their priorities and objectives and how
these will be taken into account when drafting the Partnership
Agreements and Operational Programmes. However, the alignment of
funding shall not be limited only to the Cohesion Policy programmes.
The Strategy can bring tangible and visible results only if it is
comprehensively linked to all available financial resources. Thus
Member States and bodies in charge of implementing programmes are
encouraged to align all relevant national, regional and EU funding
sources with the priorities of the EUSBSR.
There are several ways to align the programmes with the EUSBSR and
it’s up to Member States to decide which one to choose. For example,
the Common Strategic Framework, which invites Member States to ensure
successful mobilisation of EU funding for macro-regional strategies in
line with the needs of the programme area identified by the Member
States, foresees that this can be done, among other actions, by
prioritising operations deriving from these strategies by organising
specific calls for them or giving priority to these operations in the
selection process through identification of operations which can be
jointly financed from different programmes. Country position papers
adopted by the Commission provide guidance to Member States on how to
incorporate macro-regional and sea-basin strategies in the Partnership
Agreements. Specifically alignment could be done by: 1) setting a
priority axis for developing interregional and transnational
cooperation (horizontal or vertical one); 2) identifying potential
cooperation projects (projects idea) and its partners in the
Partnership Agreement and/or Operational Programmes; 3) introducing a
project selection criterion which gives priority to flagship projects
as listed in the EUSBSR Action Plan, or other projects having a clear
macro-regional impact, contributing to the targets and objectives and
to the implementation of one or more actions in the Action Plan; 4)
allocating a certain amount of funding to activities/projects that are
in line with the Strategy; 5) including a separate paragraph
describing how the objectives and priorities of the EUSBSR will be
reflected in implementing the programmes, their links.
Communicating the EUSBSR – Let’s talk about results
===================================================
Since the EUSBSR is a first macro-regional strategy in Europe, there
is a vital need to communicate the achievements on all levels to all
possible targets groups. The basic responsibility lies with the
implementing stakeholders, as evident in the governance of the EUSBSR
where dissemination, information and communication are highlighted as
a task for everyone.
The key issue is to tell e.g. politicians, taxpayers, NGOs about the
added value of the Strategy. This implies that it must be obvious what
the overall goals are and that the indicators used can mirror the
change. If so, the success of the EUSBSR can also be communicated.
The three objectives of the EUSBSR – ‘Save the Sea’, ‘Connect the
Region’ and ‘Increase Prosperity’ – are a good help and are positive
messages that can be used at global and the regional level.
Nevertheless, there should be a direct link and connection with every
single priority area, horizontal action, flagship project and action,
and described in relevant and clear messages showing that the Strategy
really delivers results and respond to the three main objectives.
Messages should be tailored to meet the needs of the target audiences.
They should be conveyed in a simple way using plain language. Every
actor and stakeholder needs to have an outreach plan and then choose
the best possible channel to reach the target audience.
Communication is needed to ensure outreach. Even if there would be
successful projects and major changes due to the implementation of the
EUSBSR it will fail if those results are not widely communicated.
The tasks to communicate lies with all key stakeholders and will be
monitored by the Commission and the Member States fully in line with
the decision in the General Affairs Council 15 November 2011.16
Objectives and sub-objectives of the Strategy
=============================================
Save the Sea
------------
The Baltic Sea and its transition area to the North Sea are still one
of the most polluted in the world. Its poor state threatens the
quality of life for the 80 million inhabitants living around it. The
problems facing the sea, including algae blooms, dead zones on the
bottom, air pollution, marine litter and noise and the negative
environmental consequences of overfishing and heavy ship traffic,
involve all coastal countries, calling for more coordinated action.
The overall aim of the EUSBSR ‘Save the Sea’ objective is to achieve
good environmental status by 2020, as required under the Marine
Strategy Framework Directive, and favourable conservation status under
the Habitats Directive in accordance with the EU Biodiversity
Strategy, and taking into account the related targets by 2021, as
required by the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP). Achieving the
‘Save the Sea’ objective is also essential to success in the other two
priority objectives to ‘Connect the Region’ and ‘Increase Prosperity’.
To help achieve this, the Strategy aims at reaching sustainability
objectives as defined in Europe 2020 Strategy and its resource
efficiency flagship and the proposed 7th Environment Action Programme.
It also aims at influencing stronger implementation of relevant EU
environmental legislation for example on the marine environment,
nitrates from agricultural sources, biodiversity, habitats, fisheries
and eutrophication, as well as the integration of environmental and
climate change concerns across all relevant policy fields, including
energy, transport, agriculture, fisheries (both wild and aquaculture)
and industrial policies. Significant sources of pollutants and
nutrients are of land-based origin. Cooperation to improve the water
quality of rivers, lakes and coastal areas and successful river basin
management according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD) is needed
to save the sea. Airborne emissions and emissions from shipping are
also substantial in the Baltic Sea and need to be addressed.
Local conditions and initiatives form the natural backdrop of the
Strategy’s work to save the sea. For example, the designation of the
Baltic Sea as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) by the
International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 2005, and its designation
as a SOx Emission Control Area (SECA) should facilitate cooperative
and effective action towards increasing the sustainability of maritime
activities such as shipping, because it remains a crucial contributor
to the economic prosperity of the region. Moreover, by implementing a
policy-driven, fully-integrated joint research programme, BONUS, the
Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme, improves the
efficiency and effectiveness of the region’s environmental research
programming, providing concrete scientific outputs to facilitate an
ecosystem-based management approach to the use (and protection) of the
region’s natural resources.
Many actions and projects under the ‘Save the Sea’ objective are
implemented with Russia and Belarus in the framework of the Northern
Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP), through HELCOM and the
Council of Baltic Sea States (CBSS) and new initiatives like the South
East Baltic Area (SEBA) and the so-called Turku process. Through a
range of projects in for instance water, wastewater, solid waste and
energy efficiency, these frameworks are helping to deliver real
benefits to the environment in the area extending from the Baltic Sea
to the Barents Euro-Arctic region.
Meeting the ‘Save the Sea’ objective will also contribute to the
greater sustainability of goods and services which rely on a healthy
marine ecosystem, including safeguarding the health of marine and
coastal environment. This will lead to sustainable growth and jobs in
marine and maritime sectors, and improve the well-being and health of
people living in the region, in line with the overall objectives of
the Integrated Maritime Policy and the Marine Strategy Framework
Directive (MSFD). Furthermore, addressing environmental challenges
will also lead to new business opportunities.
Actions to adapt to climate change are of outmost relevance both for
‘Clear water in the sea’ and ‘Rich and healthy wildlife’
sub-objectives in order to meet the set of targets. The region now has
more capacity to apply agri-environmental measures, thanks to the
development of cooperation projects under the EUSBSR. This cooperation
across agricultural and environment sectors has raised a number of
important cross-cutting issues concerning the interaction between
agriculture and environment and shown the possibilities offered by
focusing on multi-benefit measures. The role of agriculture, not only
in reducing nutrient inputs to the sea, but also in providing
solutions for ecosystem management and climate change adaptation,
should be recognised and supported.
 
PA Nutri
PA Hazards
PA Bio
PA Agri
PA Ship
PA Safe
PA Transport
PA Energy
PA Crime
PA Market
HA Spatial
HA Sustainable
Objective 1: Save the Sea
Clear water in the sea






Rich and healthywildlife







Clean and safe shipping






Better cooperation











✔ Dark check - the PA or HA primarily addresses this sub-objective
✔ Light check - the PA also addresses these sub-objectives, though not
as directly
Reliable and compatible marine data is essential to achieve the
objectives of the Strategy, in particular those related to Maritime
Spatial Planning, climate change and implementation of the Marine
Strategy Framework Directive. Marine data – geological, physical,
chemical and biological – collected largely by public institutions,
are still fragmented, of uncertain quality and difficult to assemble
into coherent pictures of the entire Baltic sea-basin. In order to (1)
increase the efficiency of all those who work with marine data –
industry, public authorities and research bodies, (2) stimulate
innovation and growth, and (3) reduce uncertainties in the past,
present and future behaviour of the sea, the European Commission
launched the European Marine Observation Data Network (EMODNET). A
first preparatory phase has been completed. Portals are now providing
data products and maps showing sediments and habitats over whole sea
basins. Calls for a second phase of EMODNET were launched in May 2012
that will deliver access to data and maps of seabeds and the overlying
water column of all Europe’s sea-basins by the end of 2014. Baltic
organisations are participating fully in this endeavour. Efforts are
also underway to identify the gaps and duplications in monitoring the
North Sea and the Mediterranean. Based on experiences with these a
similar effort can be launched for the Baltic once the European
Commission’s proposed European Maritime and Fisheries Fund becomes
operational.
Sub-objective: Clear water in the sea
Eutrophication17 is a major problem for the Baltic Sea, and for the
region’s lakes. It is caused by excessive nutrient inputs, especially
nitrogen and phosphorous, which mainly originate from inadequately
treated sewage, agricultural run-off and leaching and airborne
emissions from road and maritime traffic and combustion processes. The
nutrient load increases the primary production of the sea, leading to
toxic algae blooms, oxygen depletion and other harmful effects that
can lead to changes in the whole ecosystem. As the Baltic Sea is
shallow and semi-enclosed with a slow water exchange rate, inputs of
nutrients have a long-lasting effect on the entire sea. Therefore it
affects all countries in the catchment area and no single country or
sub-region, acting alone, can solve the problem. Close cooperation
with HELCOM and within the Northern Dimension Environmental
Partnership is of key importance. Strong support from the highest
political level is essential to the success of this joint work.
To ensure clear water, every effort must be made to achieve the
targets and indicators set under the Marine Strategy Framework
Directive (MSFD), the WFD, the Nitrates Directive, the Urban Waste
Water Treatment Directive and in the updated HELCOM Baltic Sea Action
Plan (BSAP) in 2013. The main areas for cooperation include cutting
nutrient inputs from urban waste water treatment plants, rural
settlements, shipping, and the application of sustainable agricultural
practices in the whole catchment area, with particular focus on
reduction of fertiliser inputs. Full implementation of all relevant EU
legislation is needed, alongside cross-sectoral policy-oriented
dialogue – for instance to promote the alignment of policies that have
an impact on the Baltic Sea (including the Common Agricultural
Policy). Moreover, technical solutions going beyond EU requirements
are in place for enhanced phosphorous removal in the waste-water
treatment process, in line with HELCOM Recommendations 28E/5 and
28E/6, and these should be promoted and applied.
Apart from full implementation of the Nitrates Directive (NiD) and the
adoption of reinforced measures according to its art. 5§5, additional
rural development measures could be used to go beyond this baseline
and to reduce nutrient run-off and leaching, better utilisation of
nutrients and increase the retention capacity in the landscape, and
HELCOM recommendations for manure management in agriculture (28E/4)
should be followed. Incentives for agri-environmental measures should
be allocated effectively to the most polluting areas, only measures
going well beyond the baseline should be financed, and more attention
should be paid to nutrient recycling. The European Commission’s work
on the sustainable use of phosphorus is closely related to this.
The sustainable research framework established through BONUS should be
used to support efforts.
Sub-objective: Rich and healthy wildlife
The Baltic Sea region has a unique ecosystem. It ranges from with
nearly fresh water and up to six months of ice cover in the North to
the more saline Kattegat. Only a specific selection of species can
survive in this brackish water, and the low number of macro species
makes the ecosystem extra sensitive to changes in its physical and
chemical composition, which can affect the balance of entire food
webs. These ecosystems are particularly sensitive to climate change.
There are many threats to marine biodiversity. One of the major ones
is eutrophication (see sub-objective ‘Clear water in the sea’), which
has caused low oxygen content of the bottom water in parts of the sea,
and created species-poor areas with low benthos biomass. Another
threat stems from the arrival of alien invasive species (e.g. water
flea and comb jellyfish), for example through ballast water from
ships, that compete with native species and sometimes cause ecosystem
changes.
Other threats are hazardous substances that affect the growth,
reproduction and resilience of fish, marine mammals and seabirds.
These substances include organic and inorganic contaminants and heavy
metals, emitted by land sources and from dumped chemical and
conventional munitions. Residues of pharmaceuticals also end up in the
sea.
Fisheries directly impact on stock status which in turn affects food
web structures. The Baltic Sea has a low number of commercially
exploited stocks and predominantly single species fisheries, 90% of
these are within the Community and have only one external partner.
Given these characteristics, the Baltic could be a basin in which to
strengthen the ecosystem based approach to fisheries, as well as other
specific action such as increased selectivity in fishing gears to work
towards elimination of discards. Regional cooperation across the
Baltic Sea can help support this.
Actions have to both minimise the adverse effects of human activities
that cause pollution and work towards preventing damage, by for
example establishing an ecologically coherent network of well-managed
marine protected areas as one tool within a wider integrated sea use
management (ISUM) approach to maritime spatial planning and integrated
coastal zone management (ICZM). In addition to the threats, other
upcoming trends and uncertainties that have been identified18 as
potentially damaging to Baltic Sea wildlife and biodiversity now or in
the near future include increased infrastructure development (such as
ports, pipelines, power cables etc.) and increased coastal zone
activities (including cities, tourism facilities, coastal defence
structures, energy supply systems, fish farms).
BONUS can be a useful source of science based information to reduce
the negative effects of, for instance, fishing and in countering the
introduction of new alien species by ships. This sub-objective
supports the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan’s section on biodiversity
and nature conservation, and its specific sections on maritime
traffic. The implementation and development of relevant EU policies
and instruments, including the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020, the
Common Fisheries Policy and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive,
are important aspects of the work to ensure a rich and healthy
wildlife, halt the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of
ecosystems by 2020, and restoring them in so far as feasible.
Sub-objective: Clean and safe shipping
As maritime transport on the Baltic Sea is constantly increasing,
clean and safe shipping is becoming more and more essential for the
whole area, both on sea and on land. The EUSBSR addresses the issue in
holistic manner taking into consideration various aspects such as:
*
reducing the environmental impact of ship air emissions and thus
maximising opportunities for innovation in shipbuilding and marine
equipment, illegal and accidental discharge of oil, discharge of
untreated sewage, hazardous substances, introduction of alien
organisms via ships’ ballast and hull fouling, and making joint
risk assessments;
*
strengthening and integrating maritime surveillance system, which
is a strategic tool proposed in the context of the Integrated
Maritime Policy, to help prevent marine accidents;
*
strengthening human capital: ensuring proper training, setting
common standards and enhancing maritime careers;
*
reinforcing preparedness and response capacity to major
emergencies on sea and on land at macro-regional level: improving
cooperation and coordination between various actors (maritime
safety, security, surveillance and disaster response agencies).
Sub-objective: Better cooperation
The urgency of the common environmental challenges facing the Baltic
Sea calls for closer cooperation between all coastal countries. In
fact, this is crucial for achieving the targets on clear water, a rich
and healthy wildlife and clean and safe shipping.
Several roadblocks need to be addressed. For instance, some of the
policy areas demanding closer cooperation are dealt with by different
administrations in different countries, making it a challenge to
bridge borders and sectors. Responding maritime accidents, to give an
example, may be dealt with by the ministry of the interior in one
country, the ministry of defence in another country, and the ministry
of the environment in yet another country. For instance by boosting
the work of national focal points (see chapter on governance of the
Strategy: description of roles and responsibilities) and inclusive
steering groups, the Strategy aims to promote macro-regional,
cross-sectoral dialogue, building on the work in place through HELCOM
and co-operation projects. Cooperation and exchanging good practices
in ecological education and climate change mitigation is important.
The MSFD also calls for cooperation within marine regions such as the
Baltic Sea, in order to reach the objective of good environmental
status of the marine environment by 2020.
Through better cooperation, the Strategy aims to accelerate
implementation of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, and to put in
place transboundary, maritime spatial plans applying the ecosystem
approach throughout the region. The ecological, economic and social
benefits of maritime spatial planning (MSP) are by now well documented
and, in principle, undisputed. Several Baltic Sea states have already
implemented a regime for MSP at national level and some others are in
the process of doing so. In order to have a fully functioning planning
system at regional (Baltic Sea) level, it is important that all
coastal states have national activities for planning in place, and
will work together on key transnational topics. The HELCOM-VASAB
Working Group Road Map will guide the work in order to achieve the
Strategy objective to implement MSP in all coastal states by 2020.
Otherwise, cross-border cooperation on transboundary issues will not
be fully addressed. It is therefore important that national regimes
are in place and pilot regimes/activities are launched as soon as
possible. The forthcoming policy instrument on Maritime Spatial
Planning and ICZM from the European Commission, to be adopted by the
European Council and European Parliament, will set the frame for
future initiatives in this regard. It is crucial for the success of
each of these instruments that they are mandated and empowered from
the highest political level in each participating state.
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Save the Sea’
Sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Clear water in the sea
Environmental status, incl. level of inputs of nutrients – in line
with indicators being developed in HELCOM by 2013 and under the Marine
Strategy Framework Directive.
Situation in 2010
Indicators agreed in 2013within HELCOM.
Good environmental status (GES) by 2021.
HELCOM, Marine Strategy Framework Directive.
Rich and healthy wildlife
Biodiversity status and ecosystem health (incl. fish stocks) and
amounts of hazardous substances – in line with indicators being
developed in HELCOM by 2013 and under the Marine Strategy Framework
Directive.
GES integrated indicators
Indicators agreed in 2013.
Good environmental status (GES) by 2021.
Marine Strategy Framework Directive, HELCOM.
Clean and safe shipping
Number of shipping accidents.
Annual average of shipping accidents* 2008-2010: 3,017 per 10.000
vessels.
Decreasing trend.
HELCOM
* shipping accidents are defined according to the HELCOM definition
‘all accidents (including but not limited to grounding, collision with
other vessel or contact with fixed structures (offshore installations,
wrecks, etc.), disabled vessel (e.g. machinery and/or structure
failure), fire, explosions, etc.), which took place in territorial
seas or EEZ of the Contracting Party and involved tankers over 150 GT
and/or other ships over 400 GT irrespectively if there was pollution
or not are reported’.
Illegal discharges.
Situation in 2011.
Elimination of illegal discharges by 2021.
HELCOM.
Better cooperation
HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP).
2007 (BSAP adoption).
Evaluation in 2013.
Full implementation of BSAP by 2021.
HELCOM.
Drawing up and application of trans boundary, ecosystem-based Maritime
Spatial Plans.
None in 2011.
Pilot plans in 2013.
Drawing up and application throughout the region in 2020.
European Commission, DG Mare, DG ENV, national ministries,
HELCOM-VASAB Maritime Spatial Planning Working Group, European
Territorial Cooperation programmes' reports where relevant: Plan
Bothnia, BaltSeaPlan projects.
Connect the Region
------------------
The geography of the Baltic Sea region, the very long distances by
European standards (especially to the Northern parts, which are very
remote), the extent of the sea that links but also divides the
sub-regions, the long external borders, all pose special challenges to
communication and physical accessibility in the region. In particular,
the historical and geographical position of the Eastern Baltic Member
States, with their internal networks largely oriented East-West, makes
substantial investment in communication, transport and energy
infrastructures particularly important. As well as being costly and
energy inefficient, these missing links are obstacles to the Internal
Market and to the goal of territorial cohesion.
In addition, the very extent and variety of the region creates
particular attractions for visitors and residents. The wealth of
languages and cultures that have survived through centuries of
interaction of various types, the range of urban heritage, landscapes,
seascapes and cultural landmarks available, provide great potential to
create a region that will be a magnet to internal and external
visitors. The priority areas in this section therefore seek to address
the risks and challenges, while also exploiting and enhancing the
opportunities within the region. The priority areas contributing to
the Strategy’s ‘Connect the Region’ objective can use the renewed
Strategy framework to provide territorial solutions that are smart,
sustainable and inclusive, and help connect the region both physically
and culturally.
The main priorities under this objective are: 1) to improve internal
and external transport links; 2) to improve the access to, and the
efficiency and security of energy markets; 3) to connect people in the
region.
PA Bio
PA Ship
PA Safe
PA Transport
PA Energy
PA Tourism
PA Culture
PA Crime
PA Market
PA Innovation
PA SME
HA Spatial
HA Neighbours
HA Involve
Objective 2: Connect the Region
Good transport conditions





Reliable energy markets




Connecting people in the region









Better cooperation in fighting cross-border crime and trafficking



✔ Dark check - the PA or HA primarily addresses this sub-objective
✔ Light check - the PA also addresses these sub-objectives, though not
as directly
Sub-objective: Good transport conditions
In the Baltic Sea region, transport is particularly important as the
distances – internally, to the rest of Europe and to the wider world –
are great and the conditions for traffic are often difficult (forests,
lakes, snow and ice in the winter, etc.). The region, which is located
on the periphery of the economic centre of Europe, depends strongly on
foreign trade in goods and needs well-functioning transport
infrastructure to achieve economic growth.
As the region is made up of many relatively small countries, national
actions are not enough, and even bi-lateral cooperation does not
provide the necessary solutions. Wider regional cooperation is needed
to overcome the transport bottlenecks. Many of the planned major
infrastructure projects only make sense if you look at them from a
macro-regional perspective. Regional collaboration structures need to
reflect these benefits to make sure that sufficient investment in
infrastructure is made.
Moreover, the Baltic Sea is a sensitive ecosystem, and this makes
environmental issues important when developing transport
infrastructures. The designation of the Baltic Sea as a Particularly
Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) by the International Maritime Organization
(IMO) allows the development of particular and specific measures for
the Baltic Sea to ensure the sustainability of maritime transport.
The main challenge regarding transport development in the Baltic Sea
region is to reduce its remoteness by improving links within the
region and to the rest of the EU. Without jeopardising the work under
the strategy’s first objective, ‘Save the Sea’. East-West links are
needed to overcome the infrastructure shortfalls of the eastern and
south-eastern sides of the sea. The North is very remote and therefore
dependent on efficient transport. Better connections to Russia and
other neighbours are needed. Further connections to Asia, to the Black
Sea and the Mediterranean regions should be developed. This could
increase the region’s potential as EU’s gateway to Asia.
The geography of the Baltic Sea region makes transport particularly
challenging. Improving internal and external transport links,
increasing efficiency and minimising the environmental impact of
transport systems and increasing the resilience of infrastructure to
natural and man-made disasters (including the accompanying coastal
development and infrastructure), should help boost the competitiveness
of the Baltic Sea region, and increase its accessibility and
attractiveness. Links to islands and remote communities are a specific
issue.
Sub-objective: Reliable energy markets
Despite common European objectives in energy, affirmed in European
Council Conclusions in 2011 and 2012 (calling for the completion of
‘the internal energy market by 2014’ and stating that ‘no EU Member
State should remain isolated from the European networks after 2015’),
the three Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) are not yet
properly integrated into the wider energy networks of the rest of the
EU. At present, the only power connection is the Estlink between
Finland and Estonia. However, the planned second connection – Estlink
2 – between Finland and Estonia will improve connectivity. The cable
between Sweden and Lithuania (NordBalt) and the new link between
Lithuania and Poland (LitPol Link I) are expected to improve
connectivity with the Nordic and Continental European electricity
markets by the end of 2015. Decisions on gas interconnections and the
regional LNG terminal are still pending. This hampers proper gas
integration or other ways to diversify gas supply in the Baltic States
(although a LNG terminal will be operational in Lithuania by the end
of 2014 to satisfy a part of its gas needs). As a result, the Baltic
States are practically isolated in terms of gas supply and therefore
are ‘energy island’ in the EU. Consequently, further actions for
creation a fully interconnected and integrated regional energy market
should still remain the goal for all EUSBSR states.
The development and integration of energy markets is therefore a key
goal, aiming to:
1) improve the security of energy supply, particularly in the eastern
Baltic Sea region;
2) facilitate the diversification of energy sources;
3) contribute to economic growth by improving the competitiveness of
the region and encourage investments in renewable energy;
4) contribute to the overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions
through more efficient energy distribution, increased use of renewable
energies, and action to reduce energy demand. In addition, attention
must be paid to the resilience of infrastructure to natural and
man-made disasters. The EUSBSR, promoting regional cooperation among
the EU Member States, would strongly contribute to the implementation
of common European objectives in the energy sector, creating an
integrated energy market.
The timely implementation of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection
Plan (BEMIP), an extension of the Nordic electricity market model to
the three Baltic States, and demonstration of coordinated offshore
wind farm connection solutions and other options to increase the use
of renewable energy, monitored by EUSBSR, would facilitate the work in
this area. As with all proposed investments, this should come under an
ISUM approach, including the use of environmental impact assessments
(EIAs) to ensure that the potential costs do not outweigh the
benefits.
Sub-objective: Connecting people in the region
The objectives of the Strategy will be achieved by improving
cooperation between the actors involved. Therefore, in almost all
priorities and horizontal actions, one of the effects of the strategy
will be to better connect the people in the region, either by
setting-up new networks and new platforms of cooperation, or by
strengthening the existing ones. Connecting the region also includes
improved access to communications networks and the internet as basis
for seamless flow of information and closer and more instantaneous
cooperation and exchange.
In this respect, the upcoming programmes, cooperation or coordination
organisations, and all the instruments made available to carry out the
activities, actions and projects of the Strategy will have to be used
in a way to create a wide feeling of ownership of the Strategy, for
all people concerned.
Depending on the priorities and horizontal actions concerned, this
connection may be physical, such as by access to communications
networks, cultural, intellectual or economic.
Sub-objective: Better cooperation in fighting cross-border crime
It is widely acknowledged that, without a sense of security and
confidence, it is extremely difficult, if not possible, to achieve
development of any kind. The EUSBSR therefore includes actions that
address the specific challenges of the region in this field. The
Baltic Sea region has long external EU borders which, due to
geographical conditions, are easy to cross. This places
responsibilities on many Member States to take action to protect the
safety and security of the Union as a whole.
A number of related actions need to be highlighted. Actions to combat
cross-border crime aim to bring regional cooperative focus to
assessment and prevention, strengthen protection of external borders,
and further develop long-term cooperation between Member States on law
enforcement.
The Baltic Sea Task Force on Organised Crime in the Baltic Sea region
(BSTF OPC) is the only platform where all the EU Member States from
the region, as well as Iceland, Norway, Russia, the European
Commission, Europol and Interpol co-operate. The heads of Governments
of the Baltic Sea states decides on the mandate of the BSTF OPC.
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Connect the Region’
Sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Good transport conditions
Internal and external connectivity of the region, including travel
time.
The amount of the TEN-T core and comprehensive network elements’
meeting the criteria as set out in the TEN-T Regulation.
Completion of the TEN-T core and comprehensive network in the Baltic
Sea region according to CEF and TEN-T timetables and their links to
Russia and Belarus as defined under the framework of NDPTL and
involving EaP regional transport network.
TEN-T implementation reports.
TENtec portal.
Reliable energy markets
State of Market Conditions and Interconnection of Baltic States’
energy markets with the rest of the EU.
Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan and its schedule. 
Full and environmentally sustainable interconnection of the gas and
electricity markets according to BEMIP schedule.
BEMIP.
National ministries.
Connecting people in the region
Number of organisations and people participating in programmes of
cultural, educational, scientific exchange and cooperation.
Number of organisations participating in Framework Programme, Cultural
Programme, Youth in Action and Marie Curie Action Programmes in 2009 =
43 452.
Number of people participating in Lifelong Learning programme in 2009
= 148 117.
Total in 2009 = 191,569.
Influencing a 20% increase in the number of participants (people or
organisations) in such programmes, by 2020 = 229,000.
COM data.
European territorial cooperation programmes’ reports where relevant.
Increase Prosperity
-------------------
The Baltic Sea region (BSR) includes some of the most successful and
innovative economies in the world, and regions that are fast catching
up with the European average.
The BSR is the dominant foreign trade area for the smaller economies,
like Estonia and Lithuania (share of the BSR in total trade over 50%).
For the three Nordic countries, the share of BSR trade is 37% for
Sweden and 44% for Denmark. The figures for Poland are close, with a
share of BSR trade of 35% in total trade. Only in Germany is the share
of BSR trade significantly lower, due to the volume of German trade.
It is interesting that the biggest three trading countries in the BSR
(Germany, Poland and Sweden) have a smaller share of trade with BSR
compared to total trade.
To increase the prosperity of the BSR, the EUSBSR includes actions to
promote entrepreneurship, innovation, trade and digitally driven
growth. This will improve business opportunities and make the internal
market work better on the ground, without exhausting the resource base
or the eco-systems on which they depend.
The competitiveness of the region is also closely related to a high
education level. To maintain and boost the region’s competitiveness,
we need to increase cooperation between educational institutions on
all levels and increase the mobility of pupils, students and teachers
within the region. At the same time, it is essential to improve
cooperation between educational institutions and companies. To stay
competitive, businesses in the region must be able to deliver high
quality products and services, which ask for more business-oriented
education and thus closer exchanges between the two sectors. High
quality of education also requires exploiting the learning
opportunities provided by the use of modern ICT.
It is crucial to ensure equal participation of women and men in
entrepreneurship, innovation, trade, education and in the workforce in
general, in order to make full use of the human resources potential to
boost growth and prosperity.
The Europe 2020 Strategy has a strong potential of being implemented
in the BSR, including smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. This
will not only strengthen regional prosperity, but it will contribute
to the EU as a whole. The social dimension of the EUSBSR is also
strong. Increased prosperity requires a well-functioning labor market
that promotes geographical and professional mobility.
Together with sustainable growth and resource efficiency, risk
prevention and management, as well as climate adaptation and
mitigation are a truly horizontal issue and mitigation strategy is
closely interlinked with the prosperity and competiveness of the
region. Adaptation, risk prevention and management actions are
necessary in order to meet challenges related to climate change and
build the resilience of the region to natural and man-made disaster
risks. Failure now may have devastating economic impacts in the
future, but also adverse consequences for the environmental and social
development of the region that could have been reduced, if the
disasters are prevented or managed more effectively. Mitigation
actions will also have a positive impact on prosperity, particularly
actions gearing towards an energy-efficient, clean fuels future will
generate jobs and prevent the waste of resources and money.
 
PA Nutri
PA Hazards
PA Bio
PA Agri
PA Ship
PA Safe
PA Secure
PA Transport
PA Energy
PA Tourism
PA Culture
PA Crime
PA Market
PA Innovation
PA SME
PA Health
PA Education
HA Spatial
HA Sustainable
HA Involve
Objective 3: Increase Prosperity
Single market





Europe 2020

















Global competitiveness















Climate change












✔ Dark check - the PA or HA primarily addresses this sub-objective
✔ Light check - the PA also addresses these sub-objectives, though not
as directly
Sub-objective: EUSBSR as a frontrunner for deepening and fulfilling
the single market
In the BSR there are still legal and administrative obstacles which
negatively affect trade in goods and services between the Member
States and with neighbouring countries. The markets in the BSR are
relatively small, with the exception of Germany, and therefore they
are heavily dependent on trade in the region to maintain their
competitiveness. To increase the prosperity of the region, it is
therefore imperative to fully implement the internal market and to
lower the unjustified trade barriers to the neighbouring countries.
The BSR is the dominant foreign trade area for all countries concerned
except Germany. The level of trade between countries is increasing,
but slower than would be expected, which is a sign that market
integration is not progressing as it should. It has proven to be
especially difficult for SMEs to benefit optimally from the internal
market and successfully expand their activities to their neighbouring
countries. This puts a brake on in particular those SMEs that are
growing and therefore need bigger ‘domestic markets’ to be able to
expand.
To foster good trade relations with third countries, it is important
to reduce administrative, non-tariff barriers to trade and
cross-border movement of goods, especially between the EU and Russia.
This requires improving customs procedures and infrastructure. It is
also important to strengthen international tax cooperation, improve
conditions to trade and investment, and to reinforce efforts to combat
cross-border tax fraud and evasion.
Better integration is needed if the region is to maintain and improve
its position as a prosperous region. The consultation and analysis
carried out to prepare the 2010 Single Market Review have shown that,
in many areas and sectors of the Single Market, the legal framework
does not yet function as well as it should. To strengthen trade links
within the region by reducing unjustified barriers is a cost-efficient
way of revitalising the economy. It is also important for the region
to fully implement the recommendations from the Small Business Act,
thus reducing the administrative burden for smaller companies.
Sub-objective: EUSBSR contributing to the implementation of Europe
2020 Strategy
The EUSBSR needs to be placed firmly within the Europe 2020 agenda and
current EU policy developments. With this in mind, there is a renewed
focus on the objectives of Europe 2020 Strategy of smart, sustainable
and inclusive growth. There is a new, targeted policy context with a
call for thematic concentration in line with the objectives to
increase prosperity in the BSR. The Europe 2020 Strategy’s flagship
initiative ‘The Roadmap to a Resource Efficient Europe’ recognises
that marine resources are a key component of our natural capital and
provide economic opportunities in a wide range of sectors such as
minerals extraction, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and energy.
Pursuing these in a sustainable manner is essential for the marine
environment to continue to provide its key ecosystem services like the
natural regulatory functions that help combat climate change or slow
coastal erosion. Marine and maritime sectors (as highlighted in the
Commission Communication on Blue Growth)19 create opportunities for
sustainable growth, competitiveness and jobs that should be further
explored in order to harvest the region’s potential. Promoting
horizontal priority for rural development ‘Fostering knowledge
transfer and innovation’ at the level of the macro-region may result
with Community added value.
The BSR cooperation also reinforces other EU policies, such as climate
change policies, resource efficiency or the new approach to European
research and innovation, Horizon 2020. Current work shows that the
EUSBSR adds a new cooperative and practical element to progress.
Deeper dialogue between the Commission, the Member States concerned,
Chambers of Commerce associations and Confederation of Industries will
facilitate the Strategy’s focus on ensuring an integrated industrial
policy for the globalisation era. This can make a big difference to
the region. In line with the Europe 2020 Strategy’s flagship
initiative ‘An industrial policy for the globalisation era’ and the
Small Business Act, the Strategy is working to support SME’s by
improving their access to finance, creating a more favourable
regulatory environment, and more generally by helping them adapt to
the challenges posed by globalisation. There should be a focus on
needed to supporting key sectors such as environmental technologies,
where the region is strong, but where a closer interplay between
policy and market development is lacking.
In line with the Europe 2020 Strategy’s flagship initiative ‘A
resource efficient Europe’ regional efforts should be taken to
implement this approach, using less raw material and reducing waste
though recycling and turning waste from one process into raw material
in another industrial process. All subsidies, including on fisheries,
that could be environmentally harmful should be phased out.
In line with the Europe 2020 Strategy’s flagship initiative ‘An agenda
for new skills and jobs’, a deeper social dialogue between trade
unions, employers and governments on the future challenges for the
labour market, such as those posed by demographic changes, is an
important way forward to increase labour productivity and decrease
structural differences within the region. Changes to demographic
patterns also highlight the importance of continuously addressing the
macro-regional dimension of social inclusion and public health.
Promoting a pan-Baltic Sea Region Innovation Union will require
concerted efforts to align available resources through a programmatic
approach. Increased resources need to be allocated to research and
innovation in order to meet the Europe 2020 Strategy’s goal of general
R&D expenditure. The Member States concerned need to develop and
deepen their cooperation to gear up the region to face the key
challenges of the future: resource efficiency and the protection of
the environment, health, energy, innovative and sustainable use of
marine resources, sustainable transports and digital business and
service. Several Innovation Partnerships could be of importance for
the region, such as the Innovation Partnership on Water and on
Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability, on raw materials. Full
use should be made of the opportunities created by the new Horizon
2020 framework.
A strategic process needs to be defined to identify synergies,
creating a critical mass of competences in key areas and create
synergies between initiatives for the region to improve its innovative
capacity in key market areas. This has to happen both at the policy
and business level, thus achieving better mobility, improving regional
coherence and sustainable economic growth. Regions must attract
innovative companies and establish efficient innovation support
services to increase their innovation capacity in the long term. Such
a holistic approach will depend heavily on effective partnerships
between governmental bodies (both national and regional) and business,
industry, and civil society groups who will in some cases take a
leading role in applying the ideas encapsulated by Europe 2020
Strategy.
A digital single market is hugely important to the economies in the
BSR and to its global position as an innovative region. As
front-runners in many areas of the digital economy, the region has
much to gain from the ‘Digital Agenda for Europe’ flagship initiative
of the Europe 2020 Strategy and the measures of Single Market Act to
create growth and jobs in Europe. The region has the potential to
achieve practical results by identifying and removing barriers to a
growing digital economy, including barriers to trade online
(ecommerce). Any attempts to unlock the growth and innovation
potential of digital services and content must be supported and
enabled by fast reliable communications networks which are the
prerequisite for digitally driven growth. Consequently, it is pivotal
for BSR members to implement national broadband plans that contribute
to the broadband targets set in the flagship initiative ‘Digital
Agenda for Europe’.
Sub-objective: Improved global competitiveness of the Baltic Sea
Region
The process of globalisation can result both in increased competition
and collaboration between countries and regions regarding investments
in production, knowledge, and innovation. At business level, the
development of knowledge-intensive products and services is crucial if
companies are to be competitive in the global market. At policy level,
countries, and particularly regions, must develop efficient innovation
strategies and systems to boost entrepreneurial dynamism and intensive
links between top-level knowledge institutions, private investors,
incubators and related business services. To do this in the whole
Baltic Sea region presents particular challenges, but is needed if the
region is to prosper.
If the BSR is to create a vibrant innovation environment, being
composed of relatively small countries and markets, it is vital to
increase cooperation in key economic areas. This should be reflected
in the way the Strategy operates and coordinates with other EU and
national policy initiatives and in business initiatives to boost the
region’s global competitiveness.
Institutional barriers substantially restrict the activities of SMEs
in the BSR. If development in the region is to be based on those
enterprises it is therefore necessary to lift restrictions hampering
them as swiftly as possible. The first priority is to create an
institutional framework that sets consistent rules governing the
functioning of entrepreneurship (in practice those rules are
frequently too restrictive or complex). The quality of the
institutional and legal framework in which enterprises operate in the
BSR differs much between individual states.
In the BSR, the general conditions for growth need to be strengthened,
in particular in rural areas, which are often lagging behind compared
to urban areas. To enhance the competiveness of agriculture and
forestry as well as encouragement of diversification should be
prioritised in order to improve the quality of life in rural areas.
There should be more and better support for entrepreneurship and SME
development, not least for SME Net development at local/regional
levels, and strengthened cooperation between business support
institutions. The level of trade and investments in the region could
be increased through better cooperation between trade and investment
bodies and by developing support measures aimed at further economic
integration. The same applies to the service sector. Tourism
contributes already significantly to the BSR’s economy. In 2011, there
were 66 million international arrivals to the region, which means 7%
of the world market share for tourism with a growth of 7.1%. Next to
the accessibility of the region and the sustainable use of the
cultural and nature heritage, the development of a globally
competitive and sustainable tourism offer also depends on the close
cooperation with the ICT and health sector. In addition, the crisis
may change the focus of enterprises to seize the business
opportunities of the future in ‘green businesses’, including those for
marine and maritime sectors. To secure the long-term prosperity of the
BSR, entrepreneurship needs to be included in all levels of education.
To achieve high productivity, high levels of innovation and
sustainable economic growth, the BSR also needs to increase labor
market inclusion and integration. High levels of employment, good
quality jobs, and low levels of social exclusion are vital for
BSR-based companies to stay competitive.
ICT, more specifically digital services, content and applications
transform value chains in all sectors of the economy, drive innovation
and give rise to substantial gains in competitiveness and efficiency.
This engine of growth relies crucially on the ubiquitous availability
of fast and reliable network connectivity. Therefore, the
implementation of the ‘Digital Agenda for Europe’, including its
objectives and measures for fast and ultra-fast internet, will be a
critical factor for the BSR.
Companies based in the BSR have a considerable global market share in
shipping, and the maritime sector, which provides service to shipping
companies, plays an important role in the region in terms of
employment and innovation. To improve or maintain this position, there
needs to be a greater focus on the growth potential, sustainability,
and entrepreneurship in the maritime sector of BSR countries.
Furthermore, know-how from traditional maritime industries could be
used to emerging maritime sectors.
Culture can also be considered as a strategic factor contributing to
BSR development in several aspects: as a factor of the region’s
development and as a factor for developing and building society’s
identity, both at national and transnational level. Culture and
creative industries generate GDP and help increase prosperity, thus
serving as development multipliers.
Employment has been growing due to investments in culture and creative
industries, affecting in particular the SMEs sector. Employment growth
results in higher household incomes, which in turn translates into
increased demand. Culture and creative industries therefore have a
positive impact on sustainable economic growth.
The horizontal action on the promotion of regional identity aims to
support cooperation to jointly promote the region internally and on
the global markets.
The interaction of tourism, culture and regional identity activities
will encourage partners working in these areas to better cooperate to
make the BSR homogenous enough to be considered outside and inside its
territory as an identifiable region, the overall goal being to boost
its competitiveness.
Sub-objective: Climate change adaptation, risk prevention and
management
The BSR countries are all concerned by vulnerability to climate change
with potential impacts on human security, the environment and
competitiveness. There are a lot of valuable experiences of mitigation
and adaptation to climate change in this region. Therefore, there is
much to gain from exchanging experiences and cooperation on specific
projects. The Baltic Sea is a specific eco-region, and the impacts of
climate change can be expected to be specific too. It is thus
important for local, national and transnational actors to cooperate on
adaption and mitigation, as well as on risk prevention and management
including sharing ‘best practices’ that are proven to be economically,
social and environmentally sustainable. Sharing their learning and –
where possible and useful – pooling resources is also important to
enhance cooperation.
This can concerns ‘soft’ (e.g. revision of territorial planning
strategies and risk management plans, risk assessment, assessment of
disaster risk management capacities) and structural engineering
prevention and risk management measures (i.e. flood defences,
rehabilitation of buildings).
The impacts of climate change on the BSR ecosystem can be particularly
severe due to its location, the cold climate and the vulnerability of
the natural environment. Major changes are expected to affect the
hydrology and biology of the region. Some sectors are particularly
vulnerable, such as agriculture, forestry, fisheries, tourism and
critical infrastructure. Special attention should be given to urban
planning and increased eutrophication. The development of a
macro-regional adaptation strategy will strengthen efforts to
understand, address and cope with regional impact of climate change in
a region with similar geographical and climatological conditions.
Although the likely impacts of climate change are difficult to predict
with certainty, it is clear that the Baltic Sea is warming up faster
than any other sea in the world. Air temperatures will increase, and
the pattern and volume of precipitation will change in many parts of
the region. This will increase run-off, which will in turn result in
increased nutrient inputs to the sea. Also important from an
adaptation perspective, the occurrence of extreme phenomena such as
floods and droughts will increase. This will have a major influence on
disaster management and long-term planning in the BSR. Macro-regional
strategies should also address cross border spill over effects of
specific disasters (including earthquakes, industrial accidents and
other not climate related hazards), and promote strengthened
cooperation in prevention, preparedness and response in the management
of common risks. Promoting the wide use of wood, such as in the
construction industry, if sustainably managed, is climate-smart and
contributes to a sustainable society.
Through scientific frameworks like BONUS, the understanding and
development of necessary responses to climate change and geophysical
forcing in the region should be further developed.
Targets and indicators for the objective ‘Increase Prosperity’
Sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
EUSBSR as frontrunner for deepening and fulfilling the Single Market
Volume of intra-regional trade in goods.
3 year average for the BSS region in 2008 = 416,9 billion Euros.
Influencing an increase in the intra-regional trade in goods in the
BSS region of 15% by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2).
(Trade in goods figures are based on imports + exports of goods
between BSS countries only, the baseline is the average of the
2007-08-09 totals).
Volume of cross-border services.
3 year average for the BSS region in 2008 = 43,473.1 billion Euros.
Influencing an increase in the intra-regional trade in services in the
BSS region of 15% by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2)
(Trade in services figures are based on imports + exports of services
between BSS countries only).
EUSBSR contributing to the implementation of Europe 2020 Strategy
Employment Rate (people aged 20-64) as a % of the total BSS region
population.
Average for the BSS region in 2008 = 70% of the people aged 20-64.
Influencing a higher average for the BSS region by 2020 = 75% of the
people aged 20-64.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2).
Employment Rate (people aged 20-64) as a % of the total BSS region
population.
Average for the best performing 10% of the total population of the BSS
region in 2010 = 79.53% Average for the worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region in 2010 = 61.21%.
Positive influence on diminishing the difference in an average
Employment Rate between the best and worst performing 10% of the total
population of the BSS region by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2) (The Index
is based on ‘million EUR/person employed’. The average Index for the
BSS region can be compared with the EU27 average Index = 100).
General Expenditure on R&D.
Average for the BSS region in 2008 = 2.16% of GDP.
Influencing a higher average for the BSS region by 2020 = 3% of GDP.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2).
General Expenditure on R&D
Average for the best performing 10% of the total population of the BSS
region in 2008 = 4.55%.
Average for the worst performing 10 % of the total population of the
BSS region in 2008 = 0.2%.
Positive influence on diminishing the difference in the General
Expenditure on R&D between the best and worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2).
Improved global competitiveness of the Baltic Sea Region
GDP growth
Average GDP growth for the BSS region in 2007-2008 = 1.4%.
Average GDP growth for the EU in 2007-2008 = 1,75%.
Influencing a higher average GDP growth across the BSS region by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag.
GDP (in PPS)
4 Member States with highest GDP average GDP 120.1 % of EU average
(2007-2010), remaining constant.
4 Member States with lowest GDP average GDP 59.2% of EU average
(2007-2010), in decline.
Positive influence on diminishing the difference in an average GDP
between the Member States of the BSS region with the highest and
lowest GDP by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag.
Human Development Index.
Average for the BSS region in 2008 = 44.8.
Influencing an increase of the Human Development Index of 25% for the
BSS region by 2020.
UN Human Development index.
(The Index is based on ‘life expectancy in good health’, ‘net adjusted
household income per head’ and ‘high and low educational attainment
for the population aged 25-64’. The average Index for the BSS region
can be compared with the EU27 average index – 62).
Human Development Index.
Average for the best performing 10% of the total population of the BSS
region in 2008 = 86.41% average for the worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region in 2008 = 21.05%.
Positive influence on diminishing the difference in the Human
Development Index between the best and worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region by 2020.
UN Human Development index.
Labour Productivity Index.
Average for the BSS region in 2008 = 77.8%.
Influencing an increase of the Labour Productivity Index by 20% across
the BSS region by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2) (The Index
is based on ‘million EUR/person employed’. The EU27 average Index =
100).
Labour Productivity Index.
Average for the best performing 10% of the total population of the BSS
region in 2008 = 150.1% Average for the worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region in 2008 = 28.6%
Positive influence on diminishing the difference in the Labour
Productivity Index between the best and worst performing 10% of the
total population of the BSS region by 2020.
Eurostat annual data available with 2 year time lag (NUTS2) (The Index
is based on ‘million EUR/person employed’. The EU27 average Index =
100).
Climate change adaptation
Integrated coastal protection plan and programme, including providing
for effects of increased runoff and changes in marine environment.
None in 2011.
Regional strategy in 2013.
Adoption of an integrated coastal protection plan and programme
by 2020.
European Commission, DG Clima, national ministries, OPs’ annual
reports.
Priority Areas
==============
PA Agri – Reinforcing sustainability of agriculture, forestry and
fisheries
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Finland, Lithuania, Sweden
Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries are important to the economy and
sustainable development of the Baltic Sea region. Keeping these
sectors profitable and competitive is a key factor in securing the
future sustainable development of the region. Many advantages could be
gained from increased cooperation.
More coordination and awareness of best practice could help in
addressing the environmental and competitiveness challenges in the
Baltic Sea region, in particular best practices of cross-sectoral and
integrated approaches to rural development. This would also contribute
to economic development and help provide new opportunities, such as
renewable energy production, combating climate change and
eutrophication as well as enhancing of biodiversity. There is a need
for continued cooperation and the sharing of experiences and best
practices between stakeholders at all levels.
It is important to enhance the competitiveness of agriculture and
rural areas, improve quality of life and encourage diversification.
Agriculture and rural areas also provide ecosystem services for
society as a whole and their ability to do this should be secured.
This includes encouraging closer cooperation between the different
actors in the public, non-governmental and private sectors. Actions to
enhance and promoting the development of sustainable agricultural
practices in the region should be closely linked to other EUSBSR
priority areas. For example, priority area ‘Nutri’ is important for
priority area ‘Agri’, as is the HELCOM Agriculture and Environment
Forum. Areas of cooperation with priority areas ‘Nutri’ and ‘Bio’
could include meeting the challenges of eutrophication, climate change
and biodiversity.
The Baltic Sea region is to a large extent a forest-dominated region.
The forestry sector is important for regional development and plays an
important role in maintaining sustainable employment in rural areas.
The Baltic Sea region is a leading forestry centre in the EU. The
growing importance of different forest ecosystem services is leading
to greater demands on the forestry sector, reinforced by recent EU
policies and instruments, including the 20-20-20 targets for renewable
energy, water directive, NATURA2000 network. There is a need for more
research and cooperation on a more integrated approach to utilising
wood and other forestry related products and to enhance the
competitiveness of forestry sector.
Fisheries have a long tradition in the Baltic Sea. The area can
therefore serve as a model for the development of alternative
management set-ups and instruments in support of the Common Fisheries
Policy (CFP) reform process such as a more regionalised management
approach. The Baltic Sea has a low number of commercially exploited
stocks and rather clean, single species fisheries of which about 90%
are within the EU and with only one external partner. It is therefore
a suitable candidate for an ecosystem-based management approach and
can set a good example for specific actions to be taken, such as
improved selectivity in fishing gear to contribute to the elimination
of discards.
Aquaculture has been slow to develop in the Baltic Sea region. This
has not been due to a poor market situation or unfavourable natural
conditions, but rather the difficulty of reconciling environmental
policies with a viable aquaculture economy. As a result, the economic
performance of the aquaculture industry has weakened. Furthermore,
because of the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, any aquaculture
activity requires novel, cost-effective and environmentally efficient
technologies to remain viable. There is a clear need for better and
more coherent governance and management to facilitate the development
of responsible and sustainable aquaculture in the Baltic Sea region.
In the context of the initiatives taken by the Standing Committee on
Agricultural Research (SCAR), a working group has been created with
the mandate to better coordinate national research work on developing
sustainable agriculture, forestry and fisheries in the Baltic Sea
region.
The rural areas in the north of the region are some of the most
sparsely populated areas in the EU. At the same time other rural or
coastal areas are relatively densely populated and some of these
regions face pressure from urbanisation. Consequently, the needs of
and challenges for these specific areas and their respective
agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors vary. Nevertheless, there
are many common problems such as competitiveness, environmental
challenges and the de-population of rural areas.
Many of the challenges for agriculture concern nutrients, biodiversity
and climate change. There is a need to use resources in a more
sustainable way, which means recycling nutrients more and using
renewable energy. It is also important to improve agricultural
practices for the protection of biodiversity and eco-system services,
for example by restoring wetlands. The problem of excess manure
produced through intensive animal husbandry needs to be solved. In
recent years, cooperation projects on agri-environmental measures have
been developed in the Baltic Sea region, with a capacity-building and
investment potential to contribute substantially to nutrient
reduction.
Within the forestry sector, the countries in the region differ in
terms of ownership structures and property right regimes. As a result,
there is a need for an appropriate mix of policy instruments to
effectively tackle pending challenges, such as conflicting demands on
different ecosystem services, fragmentation of forest estates and
ensuing lack of cooperation between landowners, and a lack of
knowledge of how to adapt forest management to tackle climate change
and promote biodiversity. There are already cross-border projects
where stakeholders at all levels exchange best practices on
sustainable forest management, also incorporating the latest research
findings. These projects, as well as new initiatives, will contribute
to improving the profitability of sustainable forest management in the
Baltic Sea region, with a particular focus on North-West Russia.
In July 2011, the Commission presented its proposals for the reform of
the EU common fisheries policy. Europe’s fisheries policy is in urgent
need of reform. Vessels are catching more fish than can be safely
reproduced, thus exhausting individual fish stocks and threatening the
marine ecosystem. The fishing industry is experiencing smaller catches
and facing an uncertain future. By bringing fish stocks back to
sustainable levels, the new Common Fisheries Policy aims to provide EU
citizens with a stable, secure and healthy food supply for the long
term. It seeks to bring new prosperity to the fishing sector, end
dependence on subsidies and create new opportunities for jobs and
growth in coastal areas. At the same time, it fosters the industry’s
accountability for good stewardship of the seas.
Contrary to global trends, aquaculture production in the EU territory
of the Baltic Sea catchment area stagnated or even slightly declined
during the last decade. A constantly increasing shortfall in global
seafood supply has created great demand for aquaculture to fill the
gap between declining fisheries output and increasing demand for
seafood. However, this opportunity has not been seized in the Baltic
Sea region.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Improved manure utilisation and efficiency
Investments on bioenergy plants utilizing manure of farm animals and
recycling nutrients.
TBC
Minimum of 5 new or upgraded biogas plants operational in the Baltic
Sea region in 2020.
Data bases of e.g. structural fund and rural development programmes of
the 8 Member States.
Added value through cooperation within Baltic fisheries and
aquaculture
State of Baltic Sea fish stocks and level of aquaculture production.
Activities of BALTFISH are result oriented and effective.
ICES reports on Baltic Sea fish stocks in 2011 and statistics on
aquaculture production in 2011.
Baltic Sea fish stocks at MSY level from 2015 onwards and increase in
aquaculture production and aquaculture sustainability compared to
level in 2011. GES is reached by 2020.
ICES annual advice on the state of Baltic Sea fish stocks. Multiple
sources for data on level of aquaculture production. Reporting on
activities of BALTFISH, MSFD, CFP.
Synergies from cooperation between the Rural Development Programmes
Cooperation and social dialogue between Baltic Sea region member
states’ institutions and broader number of public, social,
non-governmental partners.
There is no tradition to systematically organise regional meetings and
initiatives which unify different actors participating in Rural
Development Programmes.
Organisation of joint meetings (at least one per year) in order to
deepen the cooperation in rural development programmes. Deadline: end
of 2020; Progress review by the end of 2014.
Reporting on activities of the action ‘Enhance the combined effects of
the rural development programmes’;
Reporting without additional indicators, that means whether on the
basis of a few existing EAFRD-indicators or a qualitative description.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Develop sustainable strategies for wood
To be completed within the framework of Sustainable Forest Management
(SFM) and Research and Development programmes in order to develop a
common Baltic Sea region approach. Forestry research undertaken by the
Nordic Council of Ministers should be exploited. The strategies would
be placed in the broader context of national forestry programmes or
similar and/or national renewable energy plans that balance the supply
of wood raw material to forest-based industries, renewable energy
development, nature conservation strategies and wood mobilisation.
Flagship projects
*
Sustainable forest management in the Baltic Sea region – EFINORD.
The EFINORD flagship project acts as an umbrella for forestry
related projects within the EUSBSR. EFINORD focuses on sustainable
forest management and reflects regional issues, primarily biomass
production and ecosystem services, which are high on the agenda
for forest owners, the forestry industry, and society at large. (Lead:
NCM/SNS; Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry/Finland, EFINORD.
Deadline for progress review: 31 December 2014.
The EFINORD flagship offers an umbrella for forestry and SFM-related
activities in the EUSBSR. The following activities are under the
EFINORD umbrella: Improving market communication of wood products’
environmental values (Lead: Finland/Finnish Forest Research
Institute); Forestry and water protection (Lead: Sweden/Swedish Forest
Agency); application for deeper cooperation in 2013; Sustainable
Forest Management in Kaliningrad (Lead: Sweden/Swedish Forest Agency);
Baltic landscape (Lead: Sweden/Swedish University of Agricultural
Sciences); running until 2014; Creating a Nordic-Baltic information
service for forests and forestry (Lead: Nordic Forest Research
Cooperation Committee (SNS) & North European Regional Office of the
European Forest Institute (EFINORD); running 2010–2013; Management and
conservation of forest tree genetic resources in the Baltic Sea region
under changing climate conditions (Lead: Nordic Centre of Advanced
Research in Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding (GeneCAR)); Sub-project
2: Cooperation in breeding of Norway spruce (Lead: NordGen Forest);
Hardwoods are good (Lead: Sweden/Swedish Forest Agency); running
2010–2013; Dieback of spruce stands in the Baltic Sea region –
evaluation of stress factors, resistance of stands and management
alternatives (Lead: Latvia/Latvian State Forest Research Institute
(SILAVA); Deadline: 31 December 2014; no funding so far).
Action: Enhance the combined effects of the rural development
programmes
This action is to be completed by improving cooperation between the
actors in different institutions, and in the public, non-governmental
and private sectors in the Baltic Sea region and should lead to more
targeted measures. Programmes could be linked when they deal with
similar problems. This aim should be reached through social dialogue
and cooperation. In addition, there should be a streamlining of the
rural development measures in the national rural development
programmes, including joint initiatives. There is a need to develop
cooperation measures, with more emphasis on common innovation across
borders.
Flagship projects
*
Sustainable rural development. Projects must be developed that
bring together people in the region working on sustainable rural
development and employment, such as supporting the environment for
innovation, youth, rural tourism, agriculture and forestry. New
practices using an integrated approach should be developed. A
project called ‘Sustainable Rural Development through youth,
innovation and entrepreneurship’ is currently funded by the
Swedish Institute. This project will draw on practical experiences
to identify models and methods to enhance youth involvement in
community development and to create an innovation friendly
environment in the rural areas. Lead: Poland/Ministry of
Agriculture and Rural Development and Sweden/National Rural
Network. Deadline for progress review: August 2015.
Action: Develop strategies for a sustainable use of and breeding with
forest, animal, and plant genetic resources
This action should have a specific focus on resources considered to
have a positive effect on hindering soil erosion, on minimizing the
use of acidifying substances, on carbon capture and storage and
finally on the conservation of genetic diversity. By creating networks
within the Baltic Sea region, the aim is to strengthen and develop
cooperation in the area by exchanging information, building competence
and providing input to policy-making. Furthermore project-based
networks will be developed within different topics. The following are
some examples: plant genetic resources for agriculture in changing
climate, including pre-breeding, forestry, carbon capture and storage
and adaptation to climate change, animal genetic resources, pollution
and sustainable breeding programme, education on genetic resources.
Actions and experience of the Nordic Council of Ministers should be
exploited for further cooperation and development.
Flagship projects
*
Network of institutions for the management and conservation of
plant genetic resources (PGR) in the Baltic Sea region under
changing climate conditions. The aim is to secure sustainable
conservation and use of plant genetic resources relevant for food
and agriculture. To accomplish this, networks of institutions
within the region are already established to exchange and develop
knowledge within the field. This will be expanded to include
long-term cooperation for practical cost-efficient solutions in
the management of genetic resources and thereby strengthen food
security in the region. The first objective is to implement the
common European database for plant genetic resources (AEGIS)
promoting the utilisation of the PGR in the region for breeding
and research. This could serve as a model of regional
collaboration to other European countries. (Cross-cutting theme B:
Climate change). Lead: NordGen. Deadline: to be determined.
Action: Animal health and disease control
Action to promote animal health and disease control should be
reinforced, also in light of the potential impact of climate change on
the spread of diseases. Actions and experience of the Nordic Council
of Ministers should be exploited for further cooperation and
development, including the Nordic-Baltic cooperation in this field.
Flagship projects
*
Reinforcement of animal health and disease control. In the
Nordic-Baltic region veterinary contingency planning has been on
the common agenda for some years and that experience can be used
in a future cooperation in the whole Baltic Sea region. One
example is simulation exercises that are considered as a very
valuable tool for testing the contingency plans established for
the control and eradication of rapid spreading animal diseases.
The efforts made to facilitate training in the Nordic-Baltic
region in the use of risk analysis and creation of networks for
sharing experiences should be explored. In the event of an animal
disease outbreak, the Baltic Sea region will be working on the
intension to provide, within their resource capabilities, skilled
and competent personnel to respond to the animal disease situation
in the affected country. It is anticipated that the outcome of the
project will be adopted in strategies and activities. This will
strengthen the regions’ capacity to address global trends and to
meet requirements in the context of a common market. Actions and
experience of the Nordic Council of Ministers should therefore be
exploited for further cooperation and development, including the
Nordic-Baltic cooperation in this field. Lead: Nordic Council of
Ministers. Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
Action: Develop and improve coordination and cooperation among Member
States and stakeholders on fisheries management in the Baltic Sea
Promote the regionalisation of the Common Fisheries Policy within
BALTFISH to develop detailed technical measures for implementing
multi-annual fisheries management plans and to develop regional
solutions to horizontal problems such as discards and control and
inspection.
Flagship projects
*
Develop and improve coordination and cooperation among Member
States and stakeholders on fisheries management in the Baltic Sea.
A forum called BALTFISH has been established to enhance
collaboration among Baltic Sea Member States for the
regionalisation of fisheries management. The forum will
collaborate with relevant Baltic Sea organisations including the
Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council (BSRAC), the International
Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and the Helsinki
Commission (HELCOM) and other regional stakeholders in fisheries
management. Lead: Sweden/Ministry of Rural Affairs. Deadline for
progress review: 30 June 2013.
*
Eradicating discards. The aim is to promote and facilitate the
eradicating of discards in the Baltic Sea, beginning with a focus
on cod and now comprising species in the Baltic Sea on a broader
scale. Within the framework of BALTFISH, the flagship project has
brought together stakeholders, Member States, and the EU
Commission in order to define and discuss how to implement a
discard ban in the Baltic Sea. Joint pilot projects to support the
operation of a ban could include gear modifications or measures
such as temporal closures which would contribute to viable
solutions to avoiding unwanted catches and juvenile fish. The
details on implementing a discard ban from 1 January 2014 will be
established in a regionalised approach, and the project will
continue to facilitate and monitor the process. Lead:
Denmark/Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries. Deadline for
progress review: 1 July 2013.
*
Ensure sustainable fishing. The activity focuses on ensuring the
timely adoption and effective implementation of the proposed EU
management plan for Baltic salmon. The activity is carried out in
cooperation with public authorities and stakeholders concerned and
takes into account the recommendations of the HELCOM Baltic Sea
Action Plan, best practices and scientific knowledge including
scientific assessments by the ICES and the Scientific, Technical
and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF). Lead: Sweden/Swedish
Agency for Marine and Water Management. Deadline for progress
review: July 2013.
*
Aquabest. This project seeks to find solutions for the development
of sustainable aquaculture in the Baltic Sea region. The aim of
the project is to demonstrate that aquaculture in the Baltic Sea
region has the potential to become a nutrient-neutral food
production system. Aquabest will collaborate closely with the
AQUAFIMA project, which deals with integrated fisheries management
and aquaculture. Lead: Finland/Finnish Game and Fisheries Research
Institute. Deadline for progress review: March 2014.
Action: Enhance the combined effects of the European Maritime and
Fisheries Fund (EMFF) programmes
This action is to be completed through better cooperation and should
lead to more targeted measures. Programmes could be linked when they
deal with similar problems.
Flagship projects
Develop and improve coordination and cooperation among Member States
and stakeholders, see above.
Action: Recycling of nutrients
A more efficient use and recirculation of nutrients in plant and
animal production and reduced losses of nutrients to the Baltic Sea
are needed to enhance sustainable agriculture in the Baltic Sea
region. New practices and technologies should be developed using an
integrated approach, particularly in order to reduce losses of
nutrients from the large quantities of manure produced in intensive
rearing of cattle, poultry and pigs. Larger and more clustered
livestock farms require more effective methods to storage, process and
distribute manure. Manure can be utilised for biogas production,
giving the multiple benefit of producing renewable energy and acting
as an improved fertiliser. Slurry can be processed chemically or
mechanically in order to separate nitrogen and phosphorus rich
components (liquid/fibre parts). Separation allows nutrients to be
circulated efficiently, enables nitrogen and phosphorous to be dosed
according to crops’ needs and reduces the risk of overdosing. The
recycling of phosphorus is imperative as this is a finite natural
resource. At the same time, the phosphorus load in waters caused by
agriculture leads to eutrophication. To this end, there is a need for
interdisciplinary research, and advice, while recognising economic,
social and political constraints.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Forum for Innovative Technologies for Sustainable Manure
Management, BALTIC MANURE, is turning the perception of manure
from an environmental problem into an opportunity for business
innovation. The project develops and utilises the high potential
and know-how on innovative solutions for manure management, such
as the production of renewable energy and organic fertilisers.
Lead: MTT Agrifood Research Finland and Agro Business Park,
Denmark. Deadline for finalisation: 16 December 2013.
*
Recycling of phosphorus. Considering the global scarcity of
phosphorus and the need to feed a growing population, recycling of
phosphorus to achieve sustainable use of this valuable resource is
an urgent matter. To meet this aim, the large organic phosphorus
pools in the Baltic Sea region such as manure, sewage sludge,
carcass meal and bone meal have to be utilised in such a way as to
recover the nutrient phosphorus completely and in a plant
available form. In addition, recycled fertiliser products must
contain neither organic xenobiotics, nor pathogens which might
enter the food chain. Elaborate concepts for recycling these
residues combined with advanced, site-specific fertilisation
strategies have the potential to make the Baltic Sea region the
first self-sustaining region in the world in terms of mineral
phosphorus fertiliser input. Lead: Germany/Julius Kühn Institute
together with Baltic MANURE. Deadline for finalisation: to be
determined. The project will start in 2013.
PA Bio – Preserving natural zones and biodiversity, including
fisheries
-------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Germany
Biodiversity in the Baltic Sea is threatened by overfishing,
by-catches and incidental catches of non-target species, invasive
alien species, the destruction of habitats by human activities (such
as dredging and construction along shores and migratory obstacles in
waterways), eutrophication and contaminants. Climate change, thought
to reduce the salinity and increase the temperature of the Baltic Sea,
is also affecting aquatic biodiversity. Hence, the impact of and
vulnerability to climate change is of increasing importance. Emerging
pressures such as marine litter and underwater noise also play a role.
Fishing has a direct impact on the composition and diversity of fish
communities in the Baltic Sea. Overfishing has resulted in the decline
of numerous fish species such as salmon, eel and the extinction of the
Baltic sturgeon. MSY is not reached for many species. Fishery also
affects other non-targeted marine species, such as seabirds and marine
mammals through by-catch mortality, and competition for food. Mobile
bottom contacting fishing gears affect benthic habitats and species
through by-catch, direct mortality and the alteration of the physical
structure of the sea floor, re-suspension of nutrients and hazardous
substances.
To respond to these diverse threats, actions have to be twofold: to
minimise the adverse effects of human activities and to establish a
network of well-managed ‘Marine Protected Areas’.
It is important that those HELCOM Contracting Parties, that are also
EU MSs at the same time, carefully fulfil the obligations and
implementation needs of the relevant EU legislation. In particular,
the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020, the CFP, the EU Marine Strategy
Framework Directive, the Birds and Habitats Directives, should be the
key tools to ensure that environment protection and preservation
aspects are integrated into all relevant priority areas of this
Strategy.
Efforts should also be given to envisage how environmental aspects
could be more taken into account by the Common Fisheries Policy. On an
overall level, this priority area aims to give political support to
the timely implementation of the Biodiversity and Nature Conservation
Segment of the HELCOM BSAP.
The BONUS Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme20 is a
natural ally in the work to protect biodiversity and prevent
pollution.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Indicator
Baseline
Target/Deadline
Data Sources
Number of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPAs) with management plans in
place of the total number of BSPAs, including integration of fisheries
management measures in management plans.
In February 2010,21 34 out of 159 (approx. 21%) had management
measures in force.
To develop and apply management plans and/or measures for already
existing BSPAs by 2015
Every new BSPA designation should be followed by the establishment of
a management plan and/or measures within five years.
Existing HELCOM database
HELCOM BSEP 124B.
Implement Habitat restoration measures.
Status of restoration plans for migratory fish in 2010.22
All restoration plans have put in place and implemented by 2020.
Inventory and classification23
HELCOM BSEP 126 A.
The active conservation of endangered/threatened wild salmon river
populations and native Baltic Sea salmon populations in potential
salmon rivers.
22 ‘red’ salmon populations according to MSY traffic lights in 200924
(original salmon populations that should be prioritised for
conservation).
The active conservation of at least ten endangered/threatened wild
salmon river populations and reintroduction of native Baltic Sea
salmon in at least four potential salmon rivers by 2013 (BSAP)
Abundance of salmon population: the assessment of GES is based on the
smolt production in the rivers of wild salmon stocks. The rivers’
potential smolt production capacity (PSPC) has been estimated and the
target (so-called GES boundary) is to reach 80% of the PSPC by 2015.
HELCOM BSEP 126 A
SALAR II work (proposed follow-up of SALAR project)
Coreset Indicator on salmon abundance.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Implement the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan, in particular the
Sections on Biodiversity and Nature Conservation, and on maritime
traffic
These specific sections on biodiversity and nature conservation, and
on maritime traffic, which address the introduction of alien species
via ships’ ballast water, sediments and hulls are closely related to
the implementation and development of several EU policies, including
the Common Fisheries Policy (where the Commission is responsible for
taking the necessary policy initiatives), as well as to the
implementation of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020.
Flagship projects
*
Create marine protected areas. The Birds25 and Habitats directives26
(Natura2000 network), and the HELCOM BSPAs (Baltic Sea Protected
Areas) and the MSFD and the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020 call
for Member States to complete the designation of a network of
marine protected areas in the Baltic Sea. To be truly efficient
these areas need to be ecologically coherent and representative
and have adopted and implemented management plans that correspond
to the threats the species or habitats they are created to
protect. The designation of the marine protected areas network in
the Baltic Sea should also be taken into account in the context of
maritime spatial planning and ICZM which can contribute to
facilitating the coordination of human activities in the marine
areas. It also needs to be coordinate with measures under the
Common Fisheries Policy. Lead: Finland. Deadline for progress
review: 2015 for existing BSPAs and within five years for newly
designated BSPAs.
Action: Reduce the negative effects of fishing on the Baltic ecosystem
The MSFD objective that populations of all commercially exploited fish
and shellfish are within safe biological limits exhibiting a
population age and size distribution that is indicative of a healthy
stock, together with the objective to reach MSY by 2015, should be
respected in order to achieve good environmental status in the Baltic
by 2020. Further assessment of the environmentally negative impacts of
fishing activities including unsustainable fishing practices is needed
with the aim as a first step to consider the exclusion of the use of
certain techniques in marine protected areas to achieve their
conservation objectives. Member States need to implement regulations
and measures taken at EU level to minimise the impact of fishing
activities on marine ecosystems, such as the Pingers regulation27 and
certain technical measures. In addition, Member States can adopt
national measures to minimise the effect of fishing on marine
ecosystems within their territorial waters and for fishing vessels
flying their flag in line with, or more stringent than the existing EU
legislation. This should be especially stressed for the protection of
the critically endangered Baltic harbour porpoise population. Also in
the context of the ASCOBANS (Agreement on the Conservation of Small
Cetaceans of the Baltic, North East Atlantic, Irish and North Seas).
The HELCOM Fisheries and Environment Forum, involving fisheries and
environment authorities, provides a platform for proposing, sharing
and implementing new solutions on sustainable fisheries and nature
conservation.
Flagship projects
*
Restrict the introduction of new alien species by ships –
principally by enforcing the international Ballast Water
Management Convention and by means such as onboard treatment and
the installation of ballast water reception facilities in ports
with significant traffic flows from and towards waters outside the
Baltic Sea. HELCOM countries agreed in the Baltic Sea Action Plan
(BSAP) to ratify the Convention ideally by 2010, and by 2013 at
the latest. A HELCOM Road Map has been agreed, focusing on ballast
water management for inner Baltic voyages. Furthermore,
HELCOM/OSPAR28 and HELCOM/OSPAR/Barcelona Convention guidelines on
the voluntary interim application of ballast water exchange
standards should be implemented. Actions should build on the new
knowledge on the issue arising from ongoing research and should
promote further innovative approaches by industry and research
institutes. To a large extent, this achievement of these goals
depends on the successful implementation of the Ballast Water
Convention thus the process of ratification of the legally binding
instrument should be supported as much as possible. Lead: HELCOM,
Sweden and Germany. Deadline for progress review: 2013.
*
Establish measures to facilitate the migration and reproduction of
migratory fish species, on the basis of a classification and
inventory of rivers with historic and existing migratory fish
species such as eel and salmon as agreed in the HELCOM Baltic Sea
Action Plan (BSAP). The HELCOM Fisheries and Environment Forum in
close cooperation with the International Council for the
Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has started with inventory,
classification of the historical and existing Baltic rivers with
salmon and/or sea trout populations and suggestion of measures for
restoration plans and active conservation of such populations (HELCOM
SALAR Project) resulting in adoption of HELCOM Recommendation
32-33/1. Further continuation of this work is expected in SALAR II
(follow-up) project to address specific river restoration cases.
Multiannual plan for the Baltic salmon stock, when adopted, is
expected to contribute to national restoration activities.
National eel management plans were also developed by all HELCOM
countries, including Russia and formed the basis for series of
joint HELCOM/ICES workshops on transboundary eel management
measures, that are expected to contribute to conservation of eel
stocks as a contribution to a co-ordinated Baltic programme to
ensure successful eel migrations from the Baltic Sea drainage
basin to natural spawning grounds. Under the current European
Fisheries Fund (EFF) Operational Programmes, some EU Member States
already contribute to this objective by taking action to protect
aquatic fauna and flora, in particular to rehabilitate inland
waters, including the migration routes. The future European
Maritime and Fisheries Fund will better accommodate the objectives
of the Integrated Maritime Policy to support cross-cutting
priorities such as marine knowledge, maritime spatial planning,
integrated coastal zone management, integrated maritime
surveillance, the protection of the marine environment and of
biodiversity, and the adaptation to the adverse effects of climate
change on coastal areas. Lead: HELCOM. Deadline for progress
review: 2016.
*
Managing Fisheries in Baltic Marine Protected Areas (BALTFIMPA).
The main objective of the BALTFIMPA project is to assist, on a
regional level, the HELCOM Contracting States to comply with their
obligations to fulfil conservation objectives of marine protected
areas in the Baltic Sea by managing fisheries, when applicable.
BALTFIMPA will thus focus on marine protected areas (Baltic Sea
Protected Areas and Natura2000), analyse possible conflicts
between fisheries and conservation objectives in MPAs, including
protected species, and identify fisheries management measures
accordingly. This will be accomplished by studying the impact of
fisheries and then finding new solutions to mitigate it. Solutions
can range from improved management of fisheries regulations to
development of new types of fishing gear that are more sustainable
for the environment. These solutions then need to be promoted and
disseminated to all relevant stakeholders. Lead: HELCOM. Deadline
for progress review: March 2013 (Inception Phase to be completed).
PA Crime – Fighting cross-border crime
--------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Finland and Lithuania
The criminal dynamics of the Baltic Sea region are influenced by the
region’s position between supply countries for cigarettes and
synthetic drugs precursors, and destination countries for cigarettes,
synthetic drugs, cocaine and hashish, and to a lesser extent heroin.
Trafficking in human beings is also an issue. The BSR presents
attractive opportunities to organised crime groups from both the EU
and neighbouring countries.
An important feature of the region is the long external borders. These
often separate two very different types of legislation and make
cross-border law enforcement cooperation lengthy and cumbersome. So
the border can also facilitate certain organised crime groups and
markets. Especially mobile criminal groups, concentrated in ‘hit and
run’ type crimes, regularly operate in the northern part of the area.
A further facilitator for trade fraud in this region is the large
volume of transport across the borders and other vulnerable aspects of
the logistics sector.
The EU should promote and support the development of regional
approaches and cooperation to combat organised crime, particularly in
border regions. The further refinement of cross-border co-operation
structures in the BSR should contribute greatly to addressing the
‘security deficits’ in the area. Europol regional support can also
help and back up the desired regional law enforcement operational
cooperation.
The priority area operates within the framework of the Baltic Sea Task
Force on Organised and Crime and its Operational Committee (BSTF OPC).
This cooperation platform is an interim structure for dealing with
cross-border crime in the Baltic Sea region. Its mandate has been
extended by the Heads of Governments of the Baltic Sea States until 31
December 2016. The scheme has been in operation for 14 years and has
proved to be necessary. The developments over recent years have made
BSTF OPC more and more instrumental in initiating and coordinating
operational activities such as joint analysis and investigations. The
active participation of Russia in this cooperation gives even more
confidence in the importance of this framework.
Another important, especially in sea area, law enforcement cooperation
platform in the BSR is the Baltic Sea Region Border Control
Cooperation (BSRBCC). It was established in 1996 and with all the EU
Member States from the region, as well as from Russia, Norway and
Iceland (observer), it has since made steady contributions in the
entire field of combating cross-border criminality. It is also
involved in environmental protection as well. This cooperation has
developed in all Member States National Coordination Centers (NCC),
which are connected 24/7. Moreover, the BSRBCC is the frame for
carrying out operations at sea and along the coastline, and for
further education and regular meetings, including Frontex active
participation.
The BSTF OPC also has a mandate from the Crossfire Network for
targeting smuggling of firearms into and between countries in the BSR.
The network was established in 2008 during the OPC meeting in Sweden;
its aim is to exchange information on the smuggling of firearms, with
a particular focus on pistols, revolvers, submachine guns and assault
rifles. The network also includes Europol, the European Firearms
Experts Network, Interpol, Southeast European Law Enforcement Centre
(SELEC), the World Customs Organisation (WCO) and the WCO Regional
Intelligence Liaison Offices in Europe (Cologne, Moscow, Warsaw).
For development of trade and for trade facilitation and for fast,
secure and safe EU external trade, the EUSBSR 2012 calls for the full
use of the new cohesion policy proposals, notably to advance
cross-border infrastructure and at external borders, support
modernisation of EU customs infrastructure, equipment, systems and
well as administrational capacity building. This physical and
administrational capacity building as well reduces cross-border crime.
To specifically target human trafficking via preventive and protective
activities, the Heads of Governments of the eleven countries belonging
to Council of the Baltic Sea States have established two expert groups
composed of national experts representing all the member countries:
*
the Task Force against Trafficking in Human Beings (CBSS TF-THB);
its current mandate runs until end of June 2014;
*
the Expert Group for Co-operation on Children at Risk (EGCC); its
current mandate runs until end of June 2013.
Targets and indicators
The operational objectives/sub-objectives, indicators, baselines and
targets/deadlines will be finally set and collected after the first
operations have been fulfilled and closed. The objective is to
successfully complete joint investigations (e.g. drug seizures,
confiscation of criminal gain in the form of money, as stolen cars,
etc.). As all the operations are new and were initiated on the basis
of the Baltic Operational Crime Assessment (BOCTA) scheme, which
identifies the most common areas of criminal activity in the BSR, the
baseline is zero and the target can be set at the start of each
operational activity.
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Better cooperation
Level of cooperation and support.
Situation in 2009, BSTF OPC as interim solution.
Permanent common joint analysis and investigations and law enforcement
cooperation platform/31.12.2016.
BOCTA.
Better cooperation
Number of joint operations, investigations and activities/year.
3 on-going operations/investigations/activities 2012.
5 operations/investigations/activities by end-2013.
BSTF OPC Secretariat.
Better cooperation
to prevent trafficking in human beings for forced labour and to
protection of the victims
National and regional partnerships.
Knowledge of the mechanisms that facilitate trafficking in human
beings for labour exploitation in the Baltic Sea region.
ADSTRINGO project baseline research.
Use of enhanced national and regional partnership and improved
knowledge (manifested in preventive activities by June 2014).
ADSTRINGO project reports.
CBSS TF-THB reports.
National reports and statistics.
BSTF OPC and BSRBCC work as an umbrella for on-going and future
activities to prevent and investigate cross-border crimes in the BSR.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Implementation of the BSTF OPC Regional Strategy 2010–2014
The Baltic Sea Task Force (BSTF), currently under Norwegian
chairmanship (2013–2014), sees its mission in supporting the
participating countries, their governments and law enforcement
agencies in delivering a coordinated overview and initiating joint
activities to meet both the operational and political needs in terms
of preventing and combating organised crime in the BSR. The major
goals of the BSTF are as follows:
*
Strengthening the BSTF and Europol alignment;
*
Facilitating operational cooperation to combat organised crime in
the BSR;
*
Further development of cooperation with external partners;
*
Development of Russia involvement in operational activities within
the EU and Europol frameworks, based on regional needs.
Potential flagship projects
*
To consider the creation of a joint BSR law enforcement
authorities’ cooperation structure. The aim of the project is to
connect BSTF (joint analysis and investigation) and BSRBCC (sea
area intelligence) to create a joint cooperation structure for BSR
law enforcement authorities taking as the basis the results of the
‘MARSUNO’ project,29 as well as the outcome of DG MARE cooperation
project30 and DG ENTR surveillance projects31 aiming at
establishing permanent information sharing among Member States
authorities at EU level as described in priority area ‘Safe’. Lead:
priority area coordinators. Deadline for progress review: 31
December 2013.
*
Reduction of production and distribution of drugs in the EU.
Project aims to combat synthetic drugs in the BSR in line with the
EU policy cycle Priority Area D. To analyse the production and
import/export of precursors and to find out the illicit
laboratories and the export of the produced drugs to the market.
Lead: to be determined. Deadline for progress review: 31 December
2013.
Action: Combatting trafficking in human beings
Human trafficking is a cross-border crime of major global concern that
needs to be targeted through a multifaceted approach and regional
cooperation. The Baltic Sea region is composed of countries of origin,
transit and destination for human trafficking. Prevention is the key
tool to efficiently fight this crime. Well-functioning strategies to
assist and protect victims of human trafficking also need to be in
place.
Labour migration has increased in the past years, resulting in
increased cases of labour exploitation and related human trafficking.
While efforts to identify victims and provide assistance are a key
priority, trafficking in human beings is best fought through
preventive measures that tackle re-victimisation and revictimisation
before it happens. This is to be achieved through national networking
and dialogue among the key labour actors as well as awareness-raising
among governmental representatives at the regional level. It is
essential to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the risk
factors and vulnerabilities that facilitate human trafficking,
especially when it comes to recruitment practices and the roles of
recruitment agencies and employers. Furthermore, there is a need to
develop specific guidelines for the key stakeholders on how to prevent
exploitation.
With expert representatives from ministries of all BSR States the CBSS
TF-THB provides an intergovernmental platform for macro-regional
cooperation and a forum for transfer of knowledge and best practices
in the fight against human trafficking. Through collaborative projects
the CBSS TF-THB aims to strengthen, build upon and improve current
policies and preventive and protective work in the region. Those
projects include research and analysis, data collection, trainings and
facilitation of cooperation among stakeholders at the national level
in CBSS Member States. The CBSS TF-THB works against all forms of
human trafficking but during the strategic period 2012-2014 its main
focus is on actions and activities that can increase the capacity of
key players in the region to identify instances of trafficking for
labour exploitation and to develop strategies to address labour
exploitation.
Flagship projects
*
Take preventive measures against trafficking in human beings for
labour exploitation through improved knowledge and partnerships,
and provide support and protection for victims and groups at risk,
by means of transnational actions. Lead: Lithuania. Deadline for
progress review: 31 December 2013. On 1 July 2012 the European
Institute for Crime Prevention and Control, affiliated with the
United Nations (HEUNI) in Finland, the Ministry of the Interior in
Lithuania, the University of Tartu in Estonia and the CBSS TF-THB
commenced a two-year flagship project ‘ADSTRINGO – Addressing
trafficking in human beings for labour exploitation through
improved partnerships, enhanced diagnostics and intensified
organisational approaches’. It will be implemented in Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and
Sweden with the financial support of the Prevention of and Fight
against Crime Programme of the European Commission Directorate
General for Home Affairs. The Baltic Sea Cooperation Unit of the
Swedish Institute is financing separately the CBSS TF-THB for
project activities in the Russian Federation and Poland. The two
main activities planned in the project are: baseline research on
recruitment practices in relation to trafficking in human beings
for labour exploitation in both countries of origin and
destination and national workshops in each of the participating
countries to bring together all relevant stakeholders to discuss
cooperation on trafficking for labour exploitation and how to
prevent it. As an outcome of both activities, the project also
aims to develop guidelines on how to prevent this form of human
trafficking and exploitation. The findings of the research will be
presented and discussed on 18 October 2013 at a high-level
conference in Vilnius during the Lithuanian Presidency of the EU.
The project ends in June 2014.
Potential flagship projects
*
Enhance cooperation and coordination among the BSR Member States
to prevent trafficking in human beings in all its forms, and
strengthen efforts to protect victims of human trafficking within
the framework of the CBSS TF-THB. In line with its overall
objectives, the CBSS TF-THB will in its strategy for 2012-2014
continue to implement joint projects against human trafficking in
the region. The TF-THB is developing a project ‘The Nexus between
Migration into Precarious Labour Situations and Trafficking for
Labour Exploitation within the Baltic Sea Region’. Its purpose is
to prevent human trafficking for forced labour exploitation by
examining the nexus between trafficking for labour exploitation
and migration into precarious labour situations in CBSS Member
States. The main activities will include field research on victims
of trafficking for labour exploitation and migrants in precarious
labour situations and the development of guidelines for key labour
players on preventing trafficking for labour exploitation. CBSS
TF-THB will also facilitate and promote the coordination and
exchange of knowledge and best practices in this field. By means
of practical work and project implementation the CBSS TF-THB sets
out to ensure the sustainability of earlier projects and to build
upon the achievements already made by supporting activities at the
national level in all CBSS Member States, at their request. To
ensure the longevity of the Handbook for Diplomatic and Consular
Personnel on Assistance to Victims of Human Trafficking and its
continued distribution as a training tool, the TF-THB aims at
developing a web-based training application (eLearning) based on
the Handbook and transferring it into dynamic content that can be
used for digital training lectures. Another initiative of the
TF-THB is to publish a report on the State of the Region –
Trafficking in Human Beings with a view to tracking developments
and achieving an overview of human trafficking issues in each
Member State and the region as a whole, in order to have updated
material which can be used by researchers, cooperation partners
and stakeholders, and ensure the continuity of data collection and
analysis. The CBSS TF-THB furthermore strives to strengthen
strategic partnerships and increase cooperation with local,
regional and international organisations working against human
trafficking in the BSR and to facilitate the transfer of knowledge
and experience to partners outside the region by sharing knowledge
and providing strategic support.
PA Culture – Developing and promoting the common culture and cultural
identity
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Schleswig-Holstein (Germany) and Poland
The Baltic Sea region (BSR) has an outstandingly diverse and
attractive cultural life and a cultural heritage of great value. To
make the most of these assets it is essential to give a higher profile
to BSR culture and creativity and to promote the BSR as a common
cultural region.
Promoting cultural and creative industries will give the region a
positive and attractive image, a feature which plays increasingly
crucial role in attracting talented people, entrepreneurs and
investors to the region, particularly in the light of the growing
number of economic sectors with a high degree of virtual work
processes and services.
A coherent framework of cultural cooperation in the BSR as an
objective of the EUSBSR should be based on the wide range of
inter-governmental and non-governmental bodies which are addressing
culture in the region e.g. the cultural network ARS BALTICA, the
Monitoring Group on Cultural Heritage in the Baltic Sea States, the
CBSS Senior Officials Group for Culture (SOGC), and the Northern
Dimension Partnership on Culture (NDPC). Moreover, there are several
regional organisations which touch upon cultural issues: the Nordic
Council of Ministers, the Baltic Metropoles Network (BaltMet), and the
Baltic Sea States Subregional Cooperation (BSSSC). However, their work
needs to be better coordinated in order to achieve effectiveness of
the EUSBSR and bring an added value for the societies inhabiting the
Baltic Sea region. Close collaboration with BaltMet and the Baltic
Development Forum (BDF) in their role as horizontal action leader is
agreed and necessary in order to use the existing expertise in the
most efficient and synergetic way. The project content and the output
of the priority area ‘Culture’ are a relevant element in the
identity-building process that has to be communicated through
professional branding platforms provided by BaltMet. There are close
links to the priority area ‘Tourism’.
The creative and cultural sector plays a crucial role in fostering
innovation. Strategic investment in culture and in the cultural and
creative industries, in particular in SMEs, is vital for strengthening
a dynamic creative society in the EU and for attaining the Europe 2020
Strategy objectives. Exchanges of experience and clustering forces and
expertise in this sector will help make creative enterprises in the
BSR more professional and competitive.
In addition, culture, the arts and the regionally linked cultural
heritage are a source of common identity and shared values. Building
on these assets will boost to the commitment of the region to the
EUSBSR and to territorial cohesion in general. Making the most of
these regional characteristics and potential enriches the portfolio of
European culture in general. Development strategies should include the
cultural and creative industries, as well as cultural aspects in a
broad sense, in order to achieve positive spillover effects for the
economy and society as a whole. Fostering such an integrated model
means contributing to economic development and social cohesion in the
BSR.
Recognising culture as a resource for creativity and innovation by
integrating the creative and cultural sector in the EUSBSR will
enhance its potential for economic growth and employment.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target values/situation
Information sources
Promotion of BSR culture, cultural heritage and creative industries.
Percentage of creative industries of BSR countries GDP and employment
rate.
Figures of 2012.
Increase of 10% by 2020.
National statistics and Eurostat.
Creative entrepreneurship within the BSR.
Percentage of new successful creative enterprises.
Figures of 2012.
Increase of 5% by 2020.
National statistics and Eurostat.
Efficient framework of BSR cultural cooperation.
Better cooperation of existing BSR cultural policy bodies.
Better cooperation between the existing cultural networks and
institutions.
1st joint meeting of SOGC, NDPC, Ars Baltica and the MG Cultural
Heritage in May 2012 in Greifswald.
Regular joint meetings of BSR cultural policy bodies.
Compilation by PACs.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Joint promotion and presentation of BSR culture and cultural
heritage
The diversity, quality and attractiveness of culture and arts of the
BSR and its rich cultural heritage shall be presented in all its
differences and complexity. The aim is to strengthen civil society and
its institutions by more art and culture exchange within the BSR.
Moreover, this will help promote the BSR as a rich and attractive
cultural region.
Flagship projects
*
Art Line. This project touches the issue of art in public and
digital space. The aim is to create a collaborative network
between art institutions and academia in the region, to involve
the public in the discourse regarding contemporary art, and to
create a common South Baltic identity that is communicated to the
public through the project and its resulting artifacts. It
involves 14 partners from Sweden, Poland, Germany, Russia and
Lithuania. ‘Art Line’ receives financial support from the EU South
Baltic Programme. Lead: Blekinge Museum in Karlskrona/Sweden.
Deadline: December 2013.
*
Co2olBricks. The main goal of the project is to identify ways of
reducing the energy consumption of historic buildings without
damaging their cultural value. The cross-professional partnership
of Co2olBricks is developing new strategies for protecting the
cultural heritage. The project is necessary as up to now most
energy-saving technologies are not applicable to heritage
buildings. As brick is a widespread building material in the BSR,
the techniques developed and demonstrated in pilot projects are
transferable to the whole region in order to safeguard the unique
historic architecture of the Baltic Sea region. Lead: Free and
Hanseatic City of Hamburg. Deadline: December 2013.
Potential flagship projects
*
Baltic House. The aim of the project is to create an opportunity
to experience the diversity of the contemporary art in the BSR
countries and to make it more accessible to a wider public. The
core of the project is a continuous display of contemporary art
from BSR countries in a mobile art pavilion. One of the main
long-term effects will be to promote BSR culture outside the
region and to develop cultural skills within the region. Lead:
Baltic Sea Cultural Centre in Gdańsk. Deadline: 2016.
*
Cultural Hansa. The project aims to link the existing BSR
potential in innovation and tradition, creativity and research in
a sustainable way. As first project partners the European Capitals
of Culture (ECoC) of the region are foreseen in order to save
their achievements and to actively use their expertise for future
cooperation with, for example, Baltic Sea port and Hanseatic
cities of the region. As a multi-sectoral and multilateral network
incorporating local authorities, universities, commercial
enterprises, existing networks and projects at BSR level and NGOs,
the ‘Cultural Hansa’ is meant to be a tool for promoting the
innovative and creative strength of the BSR and a catalyst for
regional development. Withing the EUSBSR the ‘Cultural Hansa’
could form a link between the priorities of tourism, education and
culture. Lead: ARS BALTICA/Sønderborg Municipality, Denmark.
Deadline: to be determined.
Action: Cooperation on cultural heritage
An important objective is to preserve and further develop the cultural
heritage of the region and to ensure and promote public interest in
and access to these assets. The cultural heritage of the region has a
significant economic value for tourism and for the overall
attractiveness of the region.
Potential flagship projects
*
Baltic Heritage Atlas. This is a continuation of the ‘Maritime
Heritage Atlas of South Baltic’ project created and developed in
frame of South Baltic Programme. Originally, the project involved
13 partners from four countries of the South Baltic coast. The
range will now be extended to all Baltic Sea countries to connect
the whole region, promote its rich heritage and strengthen
regional identity. The project, in its second stage, includes
numerous promotional and educational activities promoting Baltic
heritage within BSR and beyond as well as raising awareness about
preservation of Baltic heritage and building regional identity.
Lead: Central Maritime Museum in Gdańsk. Deadline: 2015.
*
Baltic Sea Maritime Museums’ Network. The aim of the project is to
initiate permanent cooperation between Baltic Sea Maritime Museums
and to establish the regional network. Cooperation between
countries and museums started some twenty years ago, and the time
has come to establish permanent cooperation between maritime
museums. Project started in 2012 in Gdansk and should be revised
after every 3rd year. Lead: Polish Maritime Museum, Gdansk.
Deadline: 2015.
*
The Virtual Academy of Baltic Cultural Heritage Management (AcaBa).
The concept envisages the creation of a supra-regional umbrella
for professionals in BSR cultural heritage affairs. The project
aims to develop a network of experts leading up the way to a
virtual academy on cultural heritage management, and to build up
advanced research and training courses. Lead: Stiftung
Schleswig-Holsteinische Landesmuseen/CBSS Monitoring Group on
Cultural Heritage in the Baltic Sea States. Deadline: May 2014.
Action: Joint promotion and presentation of BSR creative industries
The creative industries are starting to be seen as one of the major
drivers of the economy. They are also gaining importance for regional
development. In particular, the BSR is considered to be the world
leader in certain creative industries areas. Cooperation among BSR
countries’ creative industries; exchange of ideas, know-how and
experience will help to share the creative potential across the whole
region, which contributes to its faster and more coherent economic
development.
Potential flagship projects
*
Facilitate cooperation of educational institutions and enterprises
in the Baltic Sea Region through the Next-level creative hub.
Located in Riga, the creative hub Tabakas Fabrika provides a
multi-disciplinary space where versatile support is available to
cultural and creative industries operators. A newly founded
creative platform will facilitate interregional exchanges of
innovative educational models and best practice in
entrepreneurship and will promote cooperation among SMEs and
educational institutions in the cultural and creative industries.
The goal of the project is also to create institutional support
for young creative professionals to start-up their businesses.
Tabakas Fabrika will also function as a space for exhibitions,
concerts, festivals, screenings, performing arts shows,
conferences, seminars and laboratory workshops. Tabakas Fabrika
creative hub plans to replicate and develop this initiative in the
other countries of the BSR. The actions taken within the hub, in a
longer time perspective, are going to result in the higher
competitiveness of regional products and services in foreign
markets and faster economical development of the region.
Cooperation partners: Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Lithuania, Norway,
Denmark, Germany, Russia, Poland. Lead: Latvia, Ministry of
Culture. Deadline: 2015.
*
Knowledge, experience and information exchange on creative
industries in the Baltic Sea Region. The Baltic Sea region will
gain from establishing a platform on cultural and creative
industries, as these can be an important factor for regional
growth. The project will first of all identify issues of common
interest and thereafter concentrate on knowledge, experience,
information and excellence exchange on an operational level, for
example serving as a support for creative start-ups and newly
established enterprises. The Nordic Council of Ministers is due to
take the lead on the project, with involvement from existing
initiatives in the field, such as KreaNord. NDPC is also a
relevant player. The project should also be seen in relation to
possible spillover-effects from the cultural and creative
industries on society as a whole, i.e. in relation to sustainable
development. Lead: Nordic Council of Ministers (tbc). Deadline: to
be determined.
*
Building up a network of creative industries in the BSR. Lead:
NDPC (tbc). Deadline: to determined.
Action: Developing a common BSR cultural identity
The Baltic Sea region is not a uniform entity with a shared history
and culture. It is made up of different political, economic and
cultural structures with all their diverse means of expression, and
individual and collective memories. The aim is to create a mutual
understanding for different political views and ways in the present
and for different viewpoints on culture and history in the past. This
will help to make people aware of regional traditions and of the need
to strengthen and develop the regional cultural identity.
Flagship projects
*
The Baltic Sea History Project. This project is the first attempt
to create a mutual understanding of history and culture in a
European region. Academic views and individual perceptions and
experiences meet in innovative ways. Within the framework of an
intercultural dialogue common regional history, culture and
identity are (de)-constructed. With the help of the wikipedia
concept, the Baltic Sea History Project breaks down the barriers
between (academic) books and the internet. The project receives
funding from the EU’s Culture Programme and the German Government.
Lead: Academia Baltica. Deadline first project phase: June 2014.
Action: Developing an efficient framework for BSR cultural cooperation
The objective is integration and cooperation between BSR cultural
policy bodies, with a view to develope synergies, joining forces and
avoiding duplication of its activities. Joined forces of main BSR
cultural actors will strengthen cultural cooperation, foster regional
development and contribute to social cohesion.
Potential flagship projects
*
Cultural share point. Improved communication and collaboration
between the existing cultural networks and institutions. The goal
of the project is to strengthen cultural cooperation to make it
more efficient through a regular exchange of practices and
information. Within this project there will be regular meetings of
all major cultural BSR players and other BSR bodies involved in
cultural affairs. The meetings will allow advanced exchange of
information on their achievements and future plans. Furthermore,
the project will also enhance mutual support in communication with
the public and promote key projects and initiatives. Integration
and cooperation between the main bodies of BSR cultural policy
should be fostered, e.g. by promoting back-to-back meetings (with
joint sessions). In the longer time perspective, Cultural Share
Point project would create a platform for more effective and
efficient cooperation between BSR bodies. Lead: Poland’s Ministry
of Culture and National Heritage/ARS BALTICA. Deadline: to be
determined.
*
Baltic Sea Region cooperation with a focus on culture as a part of
sustainable development.
The objective of the project is to include a broader perspective
of culture contributing to societal development in future BSR
cooperation and to produce practical proposals for cooperation.
The project will have a high impact on the cultural cooperation in
the region in order to think long termed sustainable development.
The project will be carried out in cooperation with the
coordinators of the priority area ‘Culture’, Schleswig-Holstein
and Poland, involving partners in the whole region. A mapping and
workshop in the first quarter of 2013 will build the basis for a
concrete cooperation project including a structure of partners,
organization and financing mechanisms. The long term aim is to
develop knowledge on cultural capacities to societal development
in order to concretize how culture can contribute to improve
economic and social life. Developing indicators and actions on
culture as the fourth pillar of sustainable development are
possible concrete outcomes. Lead: Nordic Council of Ministers.
Deadline: to be determined.
PA Education – Developing innovative education and youth
--------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Hamburg (Germany) and Norden Association (in Sweden)
In the Baltic Sea Region (BSR), the quality of life is linked to high
education levels (for example, the region has the best results in the
EU on reading literacy, upper secondary completion rate and public
investment in education), and open societies. Education and youth
policies in the BSR should help boost the quality of education and
young people’s living conditions, with the overall aim of imparting
values, building a personality, and fostering active citizenship. This
can be done through cooperation and exchange in order to learn from
each other, in the context of the Open Method of Coordination, while
respecting the full educational responsibilities of the Member States.
Increased prosperity presupposes access to good education and training
for all, an effective and inclusive welfare system and a
well-functioning labour market supporting geographical, professional
and socio-economic mobility.
Smart and inclusive growth is aided by education that encourages
people to learn, study and update their skills and competences. The
EUSBSR shall contribute to the educational benchmarks of the Europe
2020 Strategy by:
*
reducing school drop-outs rates below 10%, and
*
reaching at least 40% of 30–34 years old with third level
education
through transnational and/or cross-border cooperation.
Furthermore, the EUSBSR shall contribute to ‘Education and Training
2020’ (ET2020), the strategic framework for European cooperation in
education and training, with its four strategic objectives:
*
making lifelong learning and mobility a reality,
*
improving the quality and efficiency of education and training,
*
promoting equality, social cohesion and active citizenship,
*
enhancing creativity and innovation, including entrepreneurship,
at all levels of education and training.
With regard to the renewed framework for European cooperation in the
youth field adopted in 2009 the two interrelated objectives are the:
*
creation of more and equal opportunities in education and the
labour market,
*
promotion of active citizenship, social inclusion and solidarity.
The renewed framework outlines eight fields of action in which
cross-sectoral initiatives to support young people should be taken:
*
education and training,
*
employment and entrepreneurship,
*
health and well-being,
*
participation,
*
voluntary activities,
*
social inclusion,
*
youth and the world,
*
creativity and culture.
Europe 2020 Strategy, ‘Education and Training 2020’ and the EU Youth
Strategy, presented above, constitute the prerequisites for this
priority area.
There is a clear linkage between giving young people the chance to
develop cross-border relations and to learn more about their
neighbours, and popular commitment to Baltic Sea cooperation. This
will also boost labour mobility and stimulate cross-border business
development.
The demographic changes are having an impact on our societies. The
first large cohorts of the baby-boom generation will shortly start to
retire leading to a decline in the working-age population. The main
challenges are the lack of services in certain areas and the outflow
of young educated people. Under-utilisation of student and
professional exchanges leads to many opportunities remaining unused,
due to lack of contact and awareness.
Opportunities and challenges in the BSR should be addressed together.
The wealth of the region is contingent on its human capital, and a
well educated population is a critical factor for sustainable economic
development of businesses and societies. The young generation is the
key stakeholder for driving the change towards growth and innovation
in our region.
Activities under priority area ‘Education’, when relevant will be
closely coordinated with activities under other priority areas, in
particular ‘Innovation’ and ‘SME’.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
*
Volume of transnational cooperation on education, youth and labour
mobility within BSR, i.e. cooperation between universities,
schools, VET institutions offering adult learning or non-learning,
labour offices and youth.
a.
Number of cooperation schemes lasting two or more years.
b.
Number of young people involved in learning and/or mobility
activities within the BSR.
*
Increase the attractiveness of our region in regards for students
and apprentices from third countries.
a.
Number of students and apprentices from third countries.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Develop new methods for training entrepreneurship and
innovation
More of our graduates from all levels of our education systems need to
be prepared for starting and developing businesses. Growth in our
economies is increasingly dependent on the capability to develop new
businesses and to quickly adjust to market changes. Our SMEs need a
well-educated workforce able to contribute to growth and increased
competitiveness on the market. Most of the countries in the region are
small, and the domestic market is too small; hence the BSR should be
looked upon as an extended domestic market. In most countries in our
region the neighbouring countries are already the biggest trading
partners. Graduates from vocational education and training (VET) are
often an untapped resource in terms of entrepreneurship.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Training Programme (BTP). BTP supports the
internationalisation of vocational education and training (VET) as
well as entrepreneurship and the internationalisation of business.
The flagship is a cluster of three projects: two test platforms,
in different geographical areas of the BSR, and one dissemination
project. One project, covering Estonia, Latvia and the eastern
part of Sweden, was completed in July 2012. The two test platforms
are: Nordpraktik, covering the northern parts of Norway, Sweden
and Finland (Lead: Norden Association Norrbotten, Sweden. Deadline
for finalisation: March 2014), and the South Baltic Training
Programme (SBTP), covering the northern parts of Poland and
Germany, Lithuania, Denmark (Zealand) and the southern part of
Sweden (Lead: NetPort Karlshamn, Sweden. Deadline for finalisation
December 2014). The third project, HansaVET, is a capacity
building project offering training to 330 teachers in Estonia,
Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden in using coaching to help students
develop individual business projects and to match-make these
business projects formulated by VET students with companies abroad
(Lead: State Education Development Agency, Latvia. Deadline for
finalisation: October 2013). Another capacity building project
built on the results of the three test platforms, HansaECVET, is
planned for 2013–2015. The results of these five projects will be
embedded in a BSR-wide project to build a common market for VET
using ECVET as a tool.
Action: To meet the challenge of demographic changes and to combat
youth unemployment
The BSR is facing an increasing lack of skilled workers. In some
countries more than 20% of the jobs cannot be occupied due to a lack
of qualified personnel. At the same time, these countries have more
and more unemployed young people. The dual vocational and educational
training system combining academic education and vocational training,
already in place in countries like Denmark, Finland and Germany proved
successful and can serve as a model to other regions.
Flagship projects
*
Quick IGA. Equal opportunities for women and men in the labour
market need to be improved in every respect. This is also in the
interest of SMEs, which represent 99% of businesses in the BSR and
provide up to 70% of all jobs. Already today, their growth is
severely limited by the steadily growing lack of skilled workers.
By getting more women into the labour market, particularly in
leading positions, innovation will be strengthened. All three
goals of this project – strengthening innovation, promotion of
SMEs and in particular female entrepreneurship – are explicit
objectives of the EUSBSR. Lead: Hanseatic Parliament, Germany.
Deadline for finalisation; February 2014.
Action: Making lifelong learning and mobility a reality within the BSR
for pupils in general education, VET students, and students at
universities and under adult learning schemes. Support for pupils,
students, teachers and trainers to find information on possible
financing of mobility, support in matchmaking with partners abroad and
practical information on such things as travel, insurance and
accommodation.
Potential flagship projects
*
BSR Mobility Database. A database and other ICT instruments for
delivering information on mobility.
*
Baltic Summer job programme, offering summer jobs, a place to stay
and a leisure programme to students in the 20–25 age range. The
leisure programme offers a wide range of activities focusing on
getting familiar with the history, culture and languages of the
BSR.
Action: Enhance cooperation – on a voluntary basis – between the
regional universities of the BSR, so that they coordinate their
activities (research areas, exchange of
students/professors/researchers, cooperation with business) in order
to establish the BSR as a region of sustainable development. This
cooperation should implement political decisions taken to support
education for sustainable development. Cooperation between business
and universities should be enhanced for all aspects of sustainability.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic University Programme is the largest university network in
the BSR. The focus is on sustainable regional development, through
cooperation in education, research and applied projects. Ongoing
activities will be accompanied by PhD projects and development of
new courses such as Maritime Spatial Planning. These actions will
be accompanied by competence development for academic teachers.
Lead: Baltic University Programme (Uppsala University) in
coordination with Lithuania (Vilnius University). Deadline for
finalisation: to be determined.
Potential flagship projects
*
BUP-GreenLab. Universities are critical social multipliers in
terms of sustainable production and consumption patterns, and are
important players in their communities, as employers, purchasers
and service users. Universities are also enterprises where the
proper use of resources saves money, and safeguards reputations.
BUP-GreenLab brings together cities and universities and serves as
a catalytic meeting place for urban green innovation to show the
benefits of having a university campus within the city borders, in
support of the implementation of the triple-helix model.
BUP-GreenLab adds to the creation of demand for and capacity to
integrate green innovations in the daily functions of both
universities and cities, with a view to strengthening international
cooperation between universities and cities in the BSR, doing peer
reviews on sustainability for universities and cities in the BSR,
demonstrating models for green/sustainable campuses – campus for urban
innovation – and boosting capacity for implementing and developing
green innovations and technology.
BUP-GreenLab is presented as a living test-bed for cutting-edge
solutions: it meets the following challenges in the BSR: 1) enhanced
cooperation between universities and cities in the field of
environmentally friendly management practices, 2) enhances exchange of
expertise and good practice within the region, 3) to developing
capacity to implement innovations for a greener society, taking into
account differences in the various parts of the BSR.
Action: Closer integration and cooperation of youth policy structures
using the ‘Structured dialogue’ as an influential instrument for
involving young people in decision-making, for example by organising
round tables with politicians on local, regional and national levels,
in order to
*
improve the knowledge base of local structures and players,
*
establish sustainable structures for cooperation between
municipalities for promoting professionals and youth exchanges in
the BSR.
Potential flagship projects
*
Baltic Sea Youth Forum. To establish a Youth Forum built on
experience from the HELCOM Youth Forum but covering a wider ranger
of policy areas. Later on, the Youth Forum will organise workshops
on regional and local levels within BSR in order to involve wider
groups of young people in the discussion on the future of BSR.
*
Value-based leadership for young leaders in the volunteer sector.
Participants explore their own values and how these are
represented in their leadership. Principles that underpin the
training programme include learning by doing, leadership as
self-recognition, and diversity as a leadership question. The
course consists of four weekends, exercises to be completed at
home, and a mentor programme with a manager from the private or
public sector.
Action: Closer integration and cooperation of youth policy structures,
focusing on the local level in the Member States. Besides improving
trans-local cooperation, there is a need to:
*
improve the knowledge base of local structures and players,
*
establish sustainable structures for cooperation between
municipalities for promoting professionals and youth exchanges in
the BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Network the local youth policy structures. The aim is to foster
partnerships between different players involved in delivering
support to young people in transition, including employment
services, education providers, youth workers, social services and
young people themselves. Stronger cooperation on the ground can be
beneficial in offering tailor-made approaches, especially to young
people with more complex life situations or who are hard to reach
by conventional methods.
Promoting experiences of local and national actors in youth policy and
youth work contributes to the objectives of the EUSBSR. Youth
cooperation can be understood as a means for dealing with issues such
as climate change, environment, home, and an attractive living
environment in the BSR. To ensure this, a common knowledge base of
existing stakeholders, structures and experience of regional
cross-border cooperation, needs to be built. This mapping process must
be aligned with the local stakeholders’ work on youth-related issues
and their visibility.
Action: Social inclusion
This aims at including and strengthening the social dimension of the
EUSBSR through combating early school-leaving and drop-outs by
fostering social dialogue and cooperation on social development in the
BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Sea Labour Forum. The project aims to promote social
dialogue, tripartite structures and cooperation as crucial
elements of sustainable growth and social development in the BSR.
It will work on common labour market issues in the BSR, based on
joint transnational strategies. In particular, demographic changes
and migration processes will be taken into account. Lead:
Coordinated by the CBSS secretariat. Deadline: to be determined.
Potential flagship projects
*
Learning for Life and Work in School – LLWS Baltic. The project
aims to strengthen transnational cooperation between players in
the Baltic Sea region in the field of education, with a view to
preventing early school leaving and developing support for
vulnerable groups of students/youth. The project will thus
contribute to achieving the relevant targets in the EUSBSR and the
EU’s overall strategy Europe 2020 Strategy.
On-going and completed projects will be identified and validated in
order to gather a critical mass of project experiences/good practices
that can influence and improve systems and policies in the Member
States concerned. A mutual learning among actors representing
government agencies, schools, public sector organizations and NGOs
will be sought, and a continuous accumulation of knowledge in this
area will be achieved. Relevant EU programmes will be used and further
developed to support the project aims.
The project was initiated by the Baltic Sea Network of the managing
authorities of the ESF, including Sweden, the Aland Islands, Finland,
Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and the Land of Hamburg. SALAR
(Swedish Association for Local and Regional Authorities) will be the
coordinator of the future flagship project, LLWS Baltic. The project
will align funding and will bring together good practice and projects
on the topic of early school-leaving. This will give a boost to the
social dimension of the EUSBSR.
PA Energy – Improving the access to, and the efficiency and security
of the energy markets
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Denmark, Latvia
According to the Commission Communication and Presidency Conclusions
on the Energy Roadmap 2050, the core elements in developing a
low-carbon 2050 energy system are energy infrastructure, renewable
sources of energy, energy efficiency, and security of supply at
affordable prices. These aspects are also the cornerstones of long
term-energy policy planning in the Baltic Sea region. With a view to
promoting regional development and prosperity, there is an urgent need
to end the energy isolation of some Member States in the region, to
foster market integration, and to support energy efficiency and
sustainable energy sources throughout the macro-region.
The European Council, meeting in February 2011, set targets for
completing the internal energy market by 2014 and for ending the
isolation of all the EU Member States by 2015. Isolated energy markets
conflict with the EU vision of an integrated and competitive energy
market. To reach this ambitious target energy market isolation of the
Baltic Sea region is an urgent matter to be solved.
In the Baltic Sea region, the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection
Plan has identified the key energy infrastructure that is necessary
for a well-functioning energy market (e.g. electricity, gas, oil).
Cooperation is initiated on energy issues under the Baltic Sea Region
Energy Cooperation initiative (BASREC)32, giving special attention to
renewables and energy efficiency issues. Levels of market functioning
and competition in certain Member States are not sufficient to provide
the right incentives for investments. This creates higher risks in
terms of energy security and higher prices. In particular, the three
Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) have not been properly
integrated into the wider energy networks of the rest of the EU. The
only power connection is the Estlink between Finland and Estonia.
However the second connection – Estlink 2 – between Finland and
Estonia will ensure better connectivity. Also the cable between Sweden
and Lithuania (NordBalt) and the new link between Lithuania and Poland
(LitPol Link I) should improve better connectivity with the Nordic and
Continental European electricity markets by the end of 2015. Decisions
on gas interconnections and the regional LNG terminal are still
pending which hamper proper gas integration or other ways to diversify
gas supply in the Baltic States (although a LNG terminal currently
under development in Lithuania will be operational by the end of 2014
to meet a part of its gas needs). Because of this, the Baltic States
are practically isolated in the field of gas supply, and thus forming
an ‘energy island’ in the EU.
The fragmented structure of electricity markets and power systems lead
to the following problems: (a) low market liquidity; (b) few
incentives or opportunities for infrastructure investment especially
in renewable energy sources, and c) high dependence on electricity
imports from non-European Economic Area countries. There is also a
lack of cooperation on natural gas issues, mainly due to the lack of
gas interconnections with the rest of the region. Such situation means
lack of cross-border trade and low market liquidity, higher prices,
and less diversified energy sources.
All EU/European Economic Area countries in the region should be part
of the internal market for electricity and gas. However, the
electricity markets are still at widely differing stages of
liberalisation. It is this, linked to infrastructure gaps, that has
impeded the physical integration of the three Baltic States. Further
physical integration of the grids in the region is needed to bring
benefits in overall efficiency, and to improve security of energy
supply through increased diversification, including renewable
resources. The security of energy supply should also be promoted by
other means, such as energy efficiency, and indeed efforts to reduce
energy demand overall.
Promoting energy efficiency and utilising sustainable energy sources
are the main means of attaining climate, energy and economic targets
and of fostering sustainable growth. Market integration of renewable
energy sources still remains a challenge. Proper infrastructure
(energy market) is needed to reach the renewable energy target. This
is a challenge that requires close involvement and support from all
Member States concerned. Support schemes and cooperation mechanisms
are further aspects where cooperative actions are needed from the
states of the Baltic Sea region.
Also, climate change mitigation needs to be considered in the
development of energy markets. There might be a need to adapt to
change in terms of when and how much energy is needed in response to
climate change. Promoting the widespread use of wood, such as in the
construction industry, is climate-smart and contributes to a
sustainable society.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Reliable energy markets
State of Market Conditions and Interconnection of Baltic States’
energy markets with the rest of the EU.
The Baltic States are currently only interconnected with third
countries with regards to gas and only interconnected with Finland
with regards to electricity.
Full and environmentally sustainable interconnection of gas and
electricity markets according to BEMIP schedule.
BEMIP
National ministries.
Level of the promotion and use of energy from renewable sources,
underlying the energy efficiency issue.
2012 level of promotion and use of energy from renewable sources
indicated in the progress reports of each Member State (submitted
according to the RES Directive).
Increased use of renewable energies and better market integration of
RES to achieve Europe 2020 Strategy targets.
National ministries.
Level of energy savings.
Level of the implementation of Energy Efficiency Directive.
Level of energy savings in the progress reports of each Member State
(submitted in the context of National Reform plan).
Euope 2020 Strategy target: to increase energy efficiency to save 20%
of EU energy consumption by 2020.
Implementation deadline – 18 months.
National ministries.
Sharing best practices of regional cooperation of BEMIP with EU
Eastern Partnership countries.
BEMIP and EaP Energy Security Platform.
To see an increase in the exchange of best practices and experience on
identifying and implementing regional projects of multilateral
(common) interest, organizing seminars and bilateral consultations for
sharing the experience between BEMIP and EaP countries by end 2013.
BEMIP progress reports
EaP Energy Security Platform Work Program.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Towards a well-functioning energy market
Establish an integrated and well-functioning market for energy by
implementing the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP)
which, in addition to infrastructure projects, includes specific steps
to achieve the desired integrated and functioning internal market for
energy, identifying missing infrastructures in electricity and gas,
and providing for coordination among all actors concerned. This should
include better coordination of national energy strategies, and
measures to promote diversity of supply and better functioning of the
energy market.
Flagship projects
*
Monitor the implementation of the Baltic Energy Market
Interconnection Plan (BEMIP) correspondingly with the actions of
the High-Level Group of the BEMIP. In particular, give priority to
‘connecting the Baltic States to the energy networks of the
region’. The need to monitor BEMIP progress arises not only from
the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan by its own, but also
from the framework of the EUSBSR. The monitoring function is a
matter for the High-Level Group of the BEMIP, which has agreed
also to act as EUSBSR HLG. The aim of this project is therefore
improved coordination between the strategic goals of the EUSBSR
and the BEMIP. EU Member States concerned (Lithuania) has
organised conferences on the regional level (November 25 2009 and
September 14 2012 in Vilnius) to promote and assess the BEMIP
implementation. The Commission and the Member States concerned
have developed the BEMIP which identifies key missing
infrastructures in electricity and gas, lists necessary actions
(including financing), and provides coordination mechanisms to
bring together Member States, market players and different
financing sources. Innovative interconnector solutions involving
‘plugging in’ offshore renewable energy production installations,
are being considered. Projects listed under the TEN-E guidelines
could be co-financed by the TEN-E instruments. In addition, the
European Economic Recovery Plan provides for substantial
additional financial support to infrastructure projects in the
region. Lead: Lithuania. Deadline: progress report scheduled for
July 2013.
*
Sharing best practices of regional cooperation of BEMIP with EU
Eastern Partnership countries. The main deliverables since the
beginning of the BEMIP initiative were presented at the 7th
meeting of Eastern Partnership – Energy Security Platform on 18
June 2012. As there is interest from all parties concerned, the
initiative to share best practices of BEMIP as an example of
regional integration to the Eastern Partnership countries should
be further continued. Transfer of know-how on regional cooperation
and on the legal framework establishment for a well-functioning
energy market may be implemented through seminars and bilateral
consultations. Lead: Lithuania. Deadline: progress review in
connection with the Eastern Partnership Summit to be held in
Vilnius, 28-29 November 2013.
*
Extend the Nordic electricity market model (NORDEL)33 to the three
Baltic States by following a step-by-step approach with a fixed
timetable for implementation (market integration roadmap) under
the framework of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan
(BEMIP). Lead: Latvia. Deadline: 2013.
Potential flagship projects
*
Investment in infrastructure in the Baltic Sea Region.
Infrastructure development in the Baltic Sea region means massive
investments in the electricity and gas grid in order to improve
security of supply, the functioning of the internal energy
markets, and integration of renewable energy sources in the energy
supply. At the moment, though, there are a number of obstacles in
securing market integration and investment in infrastructure,
which have to be investigated. The purpose of the project is to
investigate and present proposals on how to overcome these
challenges while taking into account the overall sustainability of
the investments and the repeated calls for phasing out
environmentally harmful subsidies. Lead: Denmark. Deadline: to be
determined.
Action: Increase the use of renewable energy sources and promote
energy efficiency
Increased use of renewables, better integration of RES in the market,
and promotion of an efficient legal framework can be achieved by
exchanging experiences and good practices, extending the use of
sustainable biomass, solar energy and wind power (e.g. the Nordwind II
project supported by the Nordic Council of Minister’s, and Krieger’s
Flak), and especially by research in demonstration and deployment of
on and offshore wind and other marine renewable energy technologies.
The Krieger’s Flak Combined Grid Solution project is planned to be
commissioned together with the Danish OWF of 600 MW in 2018. The
region has high-level expertise in maritime technologies. The Energy
Efficiency Directive sets out energy efficiency obligation schemes in
all Member States with the aim of yielding an annual energy reduction
of 1.5%. This will enquire an exchange of best practices and
experience among Member States in the region.
Flagship projects
*
Enhanced market integration of RES and best practice sharing. One
of the best ways of achieving the goals of this action is to share
best practices on national approaches to renewable energy support
schemes. The project is concerned with greater consistency in
national approaches and with making renewable energy support
schemes in the region more effective. Lead: Latvia. Deadline: to
be determined.
*
Promote measures to develop the usage of sustainable biofuels. The
European Commission and Member States are convinced that future
increases in renewable energy use in the transport sector should
be achieved by biofuels, produced sustainably and efficiently. The
project aims to promote the production and usage of biofuels which
meet the sustainability criteria by demonstrating solutions,
sharing experiences and promoting cooperation (e.g. future common
projects). Lead: Latvia. Deadline: to be determined.
*
Demonstration of coordinated offshore wind farm connection
solutions, e.g. at Krieger’s Flak (Denmark, Germany). The
Krieger’s Flak Combined Grid Solution project is a joint
Danish-German project managed by the two Transmission System
Operators 50Hertz Transmission, Germany and Energinet.dk, Denmark.
Lead: Denmark. Deadline: 2018.
*
Promoting energy efficiency measures. The next challenge for
delivering on the Energy Efficiency Directive will be the
implementation process. For instance, one of the legally binding
measures set out in the Directive is the introduction of national
energy efficiency obligation schemes in all Member States with the
aim of yielding an annual final energy reduction of 1.5%. The
project aims to ensure efficient and successful implementation of
Article 6 of the Energy Efficiency Directive by exchanging best
practices and experience of the Member States Energy Efficiency
Obligations. Lead: Latvia. Deadline: 2015.
Potential flagship projects
*
Exploration of cooperation mechanisms. The Renewable Energy
Directive (2009/28/EC) sets binding targets for the share of
renewable energy sources in energy consumption in the EU Member
States. The overall EU target is a 20% share of renewable energy
sources that is further allocated to the countries with national
targets varying from 10% to 49%. The Directive includes mechanisms
that enable Member States to cooperate in order to reach their
targets cost-efficiently. The European Commission wishes to
increase the use of these mechanisms and has in a recent study
underlined that the earlier these cooperation mechanisms are used,
the larger the potential efficiencies will be. The Nordic Council
of Minister’s working group on renewable energy is currently
exploring the issue in a Nordic context. One way to proceed could
thus be to broaden the focus to the Baltic area, exploring the
possibility of a cooperation mechanism both within the area and
with countries outside the Baltic area. Part of the work should
also be to develop the institutional and regulatory framework for
the use of statistical transfer of renewable energy, which is one
of the cooperation mechanisms. Lead: Sweden (tbc). Deadline: to be
determined.
PA Hazards – Reducing the use and impact of hazardous substances
----------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Sweden
http://www.swedishepa.se/In-English/Start/EU-and-international-cooperation/Swedish-EPAs-work-in-the-EU/The-Baltic-Sea-Strategy/Priority-area-3/
In the Baltic Sea region, hazardous substances, including organic
contaminants, metals, pharmaceuticals and sunken chemical weapons,
continue to be a risk for the environment and for human health.
Environmental concentrations of some hazardous substances, such as
lead and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are considerably lower
today than 40 years ago. However, the number of chemicals to which
humans are exposed and that are released into the environment, has
increased substantially. There is a lack of knowledge of their
combined effects and diffuse sources. This priority area therefore
focuses on both preventive measures and on how to reduce the effects
of hazardous substances already released into the environment.
Due to their persistence and bioaccumulative properties, many
hazardous substances remain in the environment for a very long time
and may accumulate in the food chain were they can cause adverse
effects, including toxicity and health and reproductive problems,
especially in top predators. This may also have negative consequences
on human health, as, for example, some Baltic Sea fish contain dioxin
levels exceeding the EU maximum allowable levels for food. Hazardous
chemicals continue to reach the water environment, and new
environmental problems emerge, for example the release of
perfluorinated substances and pharmaceutical products. Many hotspots
in the Baltic Sea area have been remediated and the relative
contribution of chemical substances from diffuse sources is
increasing.
The predominant vector for hazardous chemicals, such as mercury,
cadmium and dioxins, to the Baltic Sea region is the atmosphere.
Mercury concentrations in some fish are exceed the level safe for
human consumption, and the daily human intake of cadmium from food is
so high in parts of the Baltic Sea region that there is a risk of
kidney lesions and of bone damage. Long-range transport of
contaminants has to be addressed on the EU and international level.
Furthermore, the extent of organic and inorganic contaminants and
heavy metals, released from chemical and conventional munitions sunk
in the Baltic Sea, is not quantified. The effects of chemical warfare
agents and their breakdown products on the ecosystem need to be
understood to monitor the situation effectively.
Natural platforms for cooperation for this priority area include
HELCOM.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Targets and indicators for priority area ‘Hazard’ have been developed
in line with existing and developing targets and indicators in the
HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan and the EU Marine Strategy Framework
Directive.
Objective/Sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data source
Concentrations of hazardous substances close to natural levels, and
zero level of man-made substances.
Trends in environmental concentrations of priority substances
(HELCOM).
Current situation in 2010 (MSFD, WFD).
Decreasing trends and/or concentrations below levels of EU
Environmental Quality Standards or other relevant thresholds used by
HELCOM.
GES by 2020.
HELCOM BSAP, EU MSFD, WFD.
All fish safe to eat.
Levels of hazardous substances in Baltic Sea fish.
Current situation in 2010
Below EU maximum levels in muscle meat of fish- GES by 2020.
HELCOM BSAP, EU MSFD.
Healthy wildlife.
Healthy populations of predatory birds.
Healthy seal populations.
Healthy fish populations.
Current situation in 2010
Targets agreed on by HELCOM 2013.
GES by 2020.
HELCOM BSAP, EU MSFD.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Preventive actions
For example, promoting voluntary substitution of hazardous substances
and raising awareness.
Flagship projects
*
Reduce the use of Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in the
Baltic Sea region. The project aims at bringing forward substances
relevant for the environment in the Baltic Sea region, such as the
recommendations on hazardous substances made through the HELCOM
Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) to the REACH candidate list.
Selected substances will be assessed to see if they fulfil the
REACH SVHC criteria, i.e. chemicals whose use will most likely be
severely restricted in the future. The SIN-List is a database of
356 chemicals and chemical groups that fulfil the REACH SVHC
criteria. Lead: The International Chemical Secretariat. Deadline
for progress review: December 2013.
*
Make the Baltic Sea region a lead in sustainable management for
pharmaceuticals. The aim is to increase knowledge among Baltic Sea
states about good practices concerning the use and management of
medicinal products by establishing a network with the focus on
sustainable development. Good practices and experience will be
exchanged between people with knowledge of medical products,
health and environmental aspects within the region. Focal points
should be established in all Baltic Sea region member states in
order to increase knowledge and to provide a platform for further
discussions towards the goal of sustainable development. Lead:
Swedish Medical Products Agency. Deadline for progress review:
December 2013.
Action: Remediation and mitigation
For example, remediative actions in polluted areas and mitigation of
emissions from point and diffuse sources.
Flagship projects
*
Assess the need to clean up chemical weapons. Assess the need to
clean up contaminated wrecks and chemical weapons where it is
required to protect sensitive marine ecosystems, taking into
account completed and ongoing work carried out by HELCOM. Since
November 2011 an ‘HELCOM-Muni’ expert group has been updating the
report on chemical munitions dumped in the Baltic Sea. The updated
report is expected to be available in 2013. Activities should
encompass identification of the current priority threats and
establishment of the costs and benefits of any possible action
under agreed research programmes. This should build on existing
knowledge and mapping in the Baltic Sea. The development of major
offshore infrastructure projects should also take into account the
location of underwater chemical weapon dumping sites. Lead: Chief
Inspectorate of Environmental Protection, Poland, with the
involvement of all nine contracting HELCOM partners. Deadline for
progress review: December 2013.
*
CHEMSEA (sub-project to ‘Asses the need to clean up chemical
weapons’). Chemical Munitions Search & Assessment. The aim of this
project is to assess the environmental risk related to dumped
chemical munitions, by updating the maps of Gotland Deep Dumping
ground and the munitions dispersed on the Baltic Seafloor,
assessing the risk for benthic biota and fish and modelling the
dispersion of contaminated sediments. Another major task is to
create administrative tools to manage the dump sites, and to
update and merge national guidelines and regulations on dumped
munitions. Lead: Institute of Oceanology PAS, Sopot, Poland, with
the involvement of 10 Institutions from Finland, Germany,
Lithuania, Poland and Sweden. Deadline: June 2014.
Action: Implementation of regulatory frameworks and conventions
Facilitating the implementation of relevant regulatory frameworks,
including full implementation of key EU directives and regulations
relating to chemicals. This should focus in particular on actions
included in the EU Water and Marine Strategy Framework Directives
(WFD, MSFD), and on implementation of international conventions, such
as the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) and the Stockholm
Convention on POPs. Enforcement is important, for example the
enforcement of compliance with Regulation (EC) 782/2003 which
transposes the Antifouling Convention by the International Maritime
Organization (IMO) into EU law.
Flagship projects
*
Development of HELCOM core set indicators. Indicators for
hazardous substances and biodiversity are to be developed to
support regular assessments of whether HELCOMs strategic goals and
ecological objectives have been reached, and whether
implementation of the Baltic Sea Action Plan has been successful.
The indicators should be fully in line with good ecological status
(GES) as defined in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive,
and the ensuing guidelines or criteria. The project will ensure
the necessary cooperation and coordination, and the marine
region-wide harmonisation needed to set Baltic Sea-specific
targets for GES related to hazardous substances and biodiversity.
Lead: HELCOM secretariat. Deadline: 30 June 2013. However, the
HELCOM work on core indicators, particularly on shared/common
databases, coordinated monitoring programmes and web-based
delivery of indicators and assessment products will continue after
2013. Especially the needs to set monitoring and assess the state
of pharmaceuticals before 2020 are among the priorities.
Action: Research and innovative management
Support continued research on hazardous substances of specific concern
to the Baltic Sea, as there is a need to enhance the knowledge base,
in particular on the interactive and cumulative effects of these
hazardous substances. Joint research is important to identify sources
of the substances in or near the region, estimate emissions, and
develop a common understanding, tools and guidance documents.
Flagship projects
*
Innovative Management of Hazardous Substances in the Baltic Sea
Region (InnoMaHaz). The aim of this project is to apply the
knowledge gained under the Control of hazardous substances in the
Baltic Sea region (COHIBA) project that mapped sources and
evaluated cost-efficient measures to address set of emerging
hazardous substances, such as pharmaceuticals. In addition to the
established measures evaluated in COHIBA, innovative measures will
be analysed in terms of cost-efficiency and ease of
implementation. This analysis will target selected fields, which
have been identified in COHIBA as potential gaps, including the
import of products such as textiles, the use of flame retardants
in the building sector or new urban infrastructure concepts for
waste, waste water and urban run-off. Relevant stakeholders, for
instance, SMEs in the Baltic Sea states, will be involved in the
project. With these activities, InnoMaHaz will contribute to an
innovation network for the management of hazardous substances in
the Baltic Sea region. Lead: Germany (Fraunhofer Institute).
Deadline for progress review: December 2013.
PA Health – Improving and promoting people’s health, including its
social aspects
------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Northern Dimension Partnership in Public Health and
Social Well-being
http://ndphs.org/
The prosperity of the macro-region is based on its human capital;
consequently a healthy population is a critical factor behind
sustainable economic development of enterprises and societies.
Improving people’s health and social well-being is particularly
important in the context of the ageing society and the growing threat
posed by non-communicable diseases, two of the greatest macro-regional
challenges in the 21st century.
Unless counteracted, a decline in the working-age population and a
higher number of people with chronic non-communicable diseases will
put immense pressure on national budgets and will lead to a loss of
productivity in the decades to come. By investing in health
improvement and promotion, the economic gain will be two-fold: (i)
healthy people are more likely to stay in the labour market longer and
remain productive, and (ii) reduced spending on treating ill health.
Currently the Baltic Sea region is an area of considerable disparities
in health and social conditions. It features places where social and
economic problems cause high levels of mortality due to
non-communicable diseases, violence, alcohol and drug abuse and the
spread of infectious diseases. Social exclusion and poverty are not
unheard-of problems either. Further, the growing cross-border movement
of people needs to be paralleled by actions addressing inequalities in
health status and in the level of health protection.
Consequently, this priority area focuses on improving and promoting
the health of people in the Baltic Sea region, including social
aspects of health, as an important precondition for ensuring
sustainable and healthy societies enjoying economic growth, and for
containing future health and social care- related costs. It is also a
precondition for labour market inclusion.
Thus far, the EUSBSR has been instrumental in fostering macro-regional
cooperation in health and making it more integrated and inclusive. In
particular, by providing a common reference point, it has contributed
to increased cooperation and a better division of labour among the
existing networks.
The Baltic Sea region countries lose human capital within the range of
9000–3000 years per 100000 inhabitants. Considering that some 80
million people live in the Baltic Sea region, it can be estimated that
at least EUR 66 billion are lost every year due to premature loss of
life by preventable causes. Thus, by reducing preventable mortality by
10%, the annual gain would be at least EUR 6-7 billion, excluding the
expenses caused by morbidity, invalidity and human suffering. Changing
the trend would give a strong boost to economic development which
would in turn allow for more investments to go to other sectors,
including education, culture and the environment.
The main challenges are demographic changes, the lack of services in
certain areas and the big regional differences in health issues (in
terms of access to and quality of health services, as well as
disparities in morbidity and mortality related to alcohol, drugs and
tobacco, communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis).
Another challenge is the impact of climate change and other
environmental factors such as air pollution and hazardous substances,
on health conditions, due to its impact on infrastructure and the
increased risk of infectious diseases by contaminated water or
infections transmitted by insects.
Recent challenges – such as the increasing burden of chronic
non-communicable diseases, growing costs of overall health care
coupled with the rapidly growing market for new medical technologies
and more informed patients – are putting heavier pressure on health
care systems and leading to calls for the rationalisation of these
systems.
As to the individual risk factors, the harmful use of alcohol is the
third leading risk factor for diseases and premature deaths globally.
The WHO’s European Region has the highest per capita consumption, and
the Baltic Sea region has in addition a high prevalence of excessive
drinking. Further, tobacco use continues to be the leading global
cause of preventable death. Drug use is relatively stable, but signs
of stability with some of the more established drugs are offset by new
threats, developments in the synthetic drugs market, the rapid
appearance of new substances and widespread polydrug use.
Finally, the continuous spread of HIV, tuberculosis and associated
infections continues to pose serious challenges in the macro-region.
The deteriorating infectious disease situation of risk groups,
migrants and other vulnerable populations is a particular concern. At
the same time, the capacity of the health care systems is insufficient
to respond to the burden of HIV, tuberculosis and associated
infections; the monitoring and provision of epidemiological
information is unsatisfactory. Existing policies and practices do not
fully support the prevention of the spread of HIV and associated
infections such as resistant tuberculosis. Last but not least, the
complexity of the HIV-AIDS-tuberculosis situation – including the
connection to the harmful use of alcohol and drugs – needs to be
properly addressed by new approaches.
There is awareness that inequalities regarding access and quality of
services vary a lot among – but also within – BSR/ND countries, but
the extent of this needs to be assessed. Generally speaking, baseline
data are hugely lacking within the health and social sector in the
BSR/ND countries and there is a need to identify the inequalities
among different communities by sex, ethnicity, age, social classes,
level of formation, etc.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. A limited number of
indicators that translate what the main objectives of the priorityare
about will be defined. They will be accompanied with relevant targets
and deadlines, baseline and statistics/information sources.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Contain the spread of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis
Through partnerships and international collaboration in prompt and
quality care for all, focusing on tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and
ensuring early diagnosis of HIV infections, providing access to
treatment and strengthening interventions to reduce vulnerability,
especially for Injecting Drug Users (IDU), prisoners, etc.
Flagship projects
The NDPHS Expert Group on HIV/AIDS and Associated Infections will plan
a comprehensive flagship project on Strengthened prevention and
reduction of impacts of HIV, AIDS & AI (TB, hepatitis B & C, syphilis,
gonorrhea) among key populations at risk in the Baltic Sea region.
Action: Fight health inequalities through the improvement of primary
healthcare
By assessing differences in the accessibility and quality of primary
health care in the macro-region, by reviewing the situation of
patients and health professionals, including their deployment,
mobility and training and by promoting e-health technology as a means
of closing gaps in healthcare access and quality. Action also needs to
be taken to enhance border health management by developing effective
and efficient primary health care, with particular attention to
cross-border disease prevention, health promotion and control of
communicable diseases.
Flagship projects
*
PrimCareIT. Counteracting brain drain and professional isolation
of health professionals in remote primary health care through
tele-consultation and tele-mentoring to strengthen social
conditions in remote parts of the Baltic Sea region. The Interreg
IV B project ‘PrimCareIT’ aims at raising the attractiveness of
remote primary health care for medical professionals by using
tele-consultation and tele-mentoring, including social media.
Information and communication technologies have a strong potential
for reducing professional isolation and providing opportunities
for professional networking, continuing medical education and
career development for younger and experienced doctors and health
workers in remote areas. ‘PrimCareIT’ has been developed under the
umbrella of ‘eHealth for Regions’ network and it complements and
reuses outputs from the flagship projects ‘ImPrim’ and ‘ICT for
Health’. Lead: South Ostrobothnia Health Care District (SOHCD),
Seinäjoki Finland. Deadline for finalisation: March 2014.
Action: Prevent lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases and ensure
good social and work environments
By developing comprehensive policies and activities throughout the
entire macro-region aimed at preventing and reducing the negative
consequences of alcohol and drug use to the society, and particularly
among children, youth, women of child-bearing age and pregnant women.
Actions will contribute to the implementation of the Global Strategy
to reduce the harmful use of alcohol, Framework Convention on Tobacco
Control, the UN 2011 Declaration on Prevention and Control of
Non-communicable Diseases, the regional strategy and action plan for
the prevention and control of NCDs and Health 2020, and the ‘Northern
Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS)
Strategy on Health at Work’.34
Flagship projects
*
Alcohol and drug prevention among youth. Project aims to reduce
hazardous and harmful alcohol use and alcohol and substance use in
general among young people. Lead: Northern Dimension Partnership
in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and its Partner
Countries. Deadline: October 2013.
Potential flagship projects
*
Promotion of physical activity and healthy food among
schoolchildren (ages 7-15). Project aimed at improved long-term
health among school-age children by reducing selected essential
non-communicable disease risk factors (overweight, obesity and
sedentary lifestyle). Lead: Northern Dimension Partnership in
Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and its Partner
Countries. Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
*
Effective and efficient implementation of national
non-communicable disease prevention strategies. Project aimed at
tackling the non-communicable disease epidemic and to support
BSR/ND countries to efficiently implement non-communicable disease
prevention strategies. Lead: Northern Dimension Partnership in
Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and its Partner
Countries. Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
*
Implementation and further development of a standardized,
comparative methodology for population survey of drinking habits
and alcohol related harm in BSR/ND countries. Project aiming at
implementation and further development of the Standardized
Measurement of Alcohol Related Troubles (SMART) methodology in the
BSR/ND countries for a more informed and evidence based policy
making in the field of reduction of the harmful use of alcohol.
Project will also assist the BSR/ND countries to develop common
approaches to alcohol data gathering in order to enable EU-wide
monitoring and cross-country comparison. Lead: Northern Dimension
Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS) and its
Partner Countries. Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
Note:
The practice of teaching health education in formal and non-formal
education should be examined, in cooperation with priority area
coordinator(s) of ‘Education’.
Cooperation with other priority areas will also be reinforced. For
example, the existing flagship project ‘ScanBalt Health Region’ will
be developed as a pilot cross-PA flagship project between priority
areas ‘Innovation’, ‘Health’, ‘SME’, ‘Tourism’ (health tourism) and
‘Agri’ (healthy food) with the purpose of connecting innovation with
health and the bio economy aiming to maintain and improve overall BSR
competitiveness.
Cooperation platforms and/or dialogues will be promoted, in order to
facilitate exchanges of ideas and practices with other partners
involved in health issues (e.g. Nordic Council of Ministers, Baltic
Region healthy cities association, city of Umea, etc.).
PA Innovation – Exploiting the full potential of the region in
research and innovation
--------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Sweden and Poland
The greatest added value will be achieved if priority is given to
sectors where the BSR is or has the potential to become particularly
strong. The potential for growth and new jobs should be explored in
many sectors, including the marine and maritime sector, and in
particular technologies for marine energy and blue biotechnology. To
further explore regional strengths, the cluster approach might be
appropriate. Furthermore, by applying the smart specialisation
concept, combining strengths, competences, R&D and players in the
whole BSR in a smart way, there are good opportunities for the BSR to
become a globally leading innovation player in several specific
fields. This will make the BSR attractive as a partner for cooperation
with other strong innovative regions in the world and it will support
companies in the BSR to increase their global competitiveness. For
SMEs in particular, BSR as a home market will be an important step in
becoming active on the global market.
The division between more established R&D institutions on the northern
and western shores vs. newly established or reformed institutions on
the eastern and south-eastern shores of the Baltic Sea is still very
present, despite recent high growth in the eastern parts. This is also
reflected in the latest Innovation Union Scoreboard 2011. The BSR
includes some of the innovation top-performers in Europe, and others
that are lagging behind. To draw the full benefits from the regions
innovation potential, a more coherent approach is needed, based on
cooperation and trust.
Such a focus on innovation has the added advantage of developing the
BSR’s economy away from a traditional high-footprint industrial focus
towards more sustainable profit-making sectors.
It is also important to make full use of the opportunities to
cooperate within the framework of the European Research Area (ERA).
This priority area is closely linked to priority are ‘SME’.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/
subobjective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Improved global competitiveness of the Baltic Sea region, through
a) increased innovation capacity/performance.
b) A global competitive position in research and innovation and on
global markets has been achieved, by BSR actors in cooperation, within
a number of areas with an expected high market volume.
EUSBSR contributing to the implementation of Europe 2020, specially
smart specialization and smart, inclusive and sustainable growth
through
long term transnational cooperation on research and innovation within
BSR, focussing areas with large future market-potentials, including
marine resources.
Innovation capacity/performance for each EUBSR country.
The globally attractiveness of innovation milieus within BSR (measured
as
a) number, per 3-year period, of cooperations with actors outside BSR;
b) investments, per 3-yerar period, from outside BSR into innovation
milieus within BSR;
c) number of high competence people from outside BSR moving to strong
innovation milieus within BSR).
Volume
( - number and - aggregated size/budgets) of long term (3 years or
more) transnational cooperation on research and innovation within BSR
(with actors from 3 or more countries).
Innovation Scoreboard 2010 (data from 2009) BSR Innovation monitor
2012 (FORA).
Baseline 2009.
Baseline 2009.
2016: SE, FI, DK, DE to keep the ranking as being among the top 4
countries in EU
2016: PL, ES, LT, LE; increased ranking number within EU by in average
4 units
2020: SE; FI, DK, DE to keep the ranking as being among the top 4
countries in EU
2020: PL, ES, LT, LE increased ranking number within EU by in average
7 units compared to 2010
The target will also be appraised against the improvement of
innovation performance in absolute terms.
Numbers of cooperations
2016; + 20%
2020; + 40%.
Investments into BSR;
2016; + 15%
2020; + 30%
Number of high competence people moving into BSR;
2016, + 20%
2020, + 40%.
Number of trans-national cooperations;
2013; + 25%
2016; + 100%
2020; + 150%.
Aggregated size of transnational cooperations;
2013; + 25%
2016; +100%
2020: +150%.
Innovation Union Scoreboard
BSR Innovation Monitor (FORA).
Questionnaire, sent each 3-4 year to strong inno-vation milieus within
BSR as listed by national innovation agencies.
Funding programs and bodies on EU, national and regional level.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Establish a common Baltic Sea region innovation strategy
To be based on the results of all the flagship projects and address
the following four challenges: (a) reduce existing innovation
barriers, including the harmonisation of different legal and
regulatory environments for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI),
particularly for further developing the demand-side approaches to
innovation; (b) facilitate trans-national cooperation for the
development and commercial exploitation of joint research projects;
(c) utilise together the high-level human capital in the region and
promote the mobility of researchers; and cooperation between students
and companies; (d) jointly develop new and better innovation support
instruments, including Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) support.
This work will build upon similar efforts undertaken under the
PRO-INNO Europe initiative.
Flagship projects
*
BSR Stars. A Programme for Research & Innovation, Clusters and SME
networks in the BSR. The objective of BSR Stars is to create a
number of world-leading innovation hubs in the BSR by fostering
R&I and business-driven transnational collaboration between
companies, strong R&I milieus, clusters and SME networks, in order
to strengthen economic growth in the whole BSR. BSR Stars will
mobilize transnational cooperation between competences and actors
in the BSR in order to successfully address some of the grand
societal challenges with expected large global market potentials.
BSR Stars will, together with the ‘Demola’ network, develop a
common open platform where students and universities can develop
new products and services together with companies. The platform
will be an enabler for novel cross-border university-business
cooperation to create real solutions to existing problems and
challenges in the BSR. BSR Stars will establish ‘a new BSR brand’,
building on ‘smartness’, research, innovation and cooperation,
leading to capacity building, stronger international
competitiveness, increase in foreign investments and world-class
players in some strategic areas. The successively improve BSR
competitiveness and innovation through transnational cooperation
requires mobilising and aligning funding from European, national
and regional programmes. The BSR Stars programme will also include
the development of a ‘Baltic Sea Region’ method for better
exploiting the potential of innovative SMEs by connecting SME
networks (mainly) initiated at local/regional levels. An
additional objective is to ‘develop a regional foresight
programme’, which will help identify desirable directions of
cooperation in R&D and innovation. BSR Stars will, in cooperation
with the Nordic Council of Ministers, initiate ‘BSR Innovation
Express’ – a joint call to improve the internationalisation of
clusters and the SME network. This will enable cluster
organisations and companies to access support for networking,
business match-making and market research activities etc. Lead:
Sweden and Lithuania. Deadline for progress review: 2015 and 2020.
*
Create Funding models for transnational Innovation and Research in
the Baltic Sea Region. The purpose is to strengthen BSR innovation
capacity by developing financial concepts and models that can use
relevant EU programmes, such as Horizon 2020 and the Structural
Funds, in a way that contributes to the aligning of funding. The
aim is to promote transnational and transregional innovation and
research as a way of increasing the international competitiveness
of the BSR and thereby achieving the necessary commitment to fund
activities such as transregional collaboration on open innovation
systems, clusters and SME networks. This will be achieved by
creating a Baltic Sea region network of regions and players that
uses tested and successful financial models and develops new ones.
The network will coordinate its work with other flagship projects
in the priority area, the Commission and relevant national
players. It will seek to improve the coordination and alignment of
existing and future funding (2014 onwards) for research,
development and innovation at the EU, national and regional
levels, as well as private funding. Lead: Region Skåne. Deadline
for progress review: 2014.
*
The Baltic Ring; establish an infrastructure for free movement of
knowledge in the Baltic Sea Area. The purpose is to establish an
infrastructure for the free movement of knowledge through
high-capacity networks and by developing eScience, with a view to
interconnecting the research and education communities of the
countries around the Baltic Sea. The costs associated with this
network for communication are covered by the ordinary national
principles for network cooperation. The additional costs of a
complete ring fall mainly within the Baltic States and, if it is
willing to join, Russia. The proposed technological, scientific
and educational efforts are expected to have an immediate,
short-term and long-term impact on industry and society in terms
of visibility, technological advances and competence development.
The project is planned to be completed within five years. Lead:
Nordic Council of Ministers. Deadline for finalisation: 2017.
*
ScanBalt Health Region: cross-sectoral and transnational projects
for innovation in health and in life sciences. The promotion of
public health on a high level and the exploitation of modern life
sciences are prerequisites for the BSR to become a globally
competitive and prosperous macro-region. Furthermore the
demographic challenges can only be met in an open innovation
market across all sectors of science, technology and social
wellbeing. The purpose of ScanBalt Health Region is to (1) bundle
regional competences within life sciences and health; (2)
elaborate, align and integrate smart innovation and development
strategies which meet the needs and demands of both metropolitan
and rural regions; (3) establish and promote a professional,
trans-regional, service based collaboration platform (ScanBalt
IBIS = International Business Innovation Support); (4) connect the
interests for collaboration and interaction between priority areas
in the EUSBSR Action plan within ‘Health’, ‘Innovation’, ‘SME’,
‘Bio’, ‘Agri’ and ‘Tourism’. Finally, ScanBalt Health Region is a
platform for enhancing the branding and visibility of the BSR in
order to attract and retain human, financial and industrial
resources. ScanBalt Health Region is to be regarded as a model for
a knowledge-based health and bioeconomy leading to high
added-value jobs based on a shared and bottom-up developed
strategy. Lead: BioCon Valley® GmbH Greifswald (Germany),
Lithuanian Biotechnology Association (Lithuania) and ScanBalt fmba
(Denmark, BSR). Deadline for progress review: annually.
*
Setting up a Baltic Science Link. Research infrastructure is
important for a region to be at the forefront of research and
innovation. The BSR has several important existing infrastructure
installations (the high-energy PETRA-III storage ring at the
German Synchrotron Research Centre in Hamburg; the European X-Ray
Laser project XFEL in Schleswig-Holstein; the MAXIV, Synchrotron
Radiation Research, Nuclear Physics and Accelerator Physics lab
and the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Lund.35 This
infrastructure should be used to strengthen the scientific
capability and competitiveness as well as the attractiveness of
the region. This could be done by building a strong network
between universities, research institutes and industries in the
region, i.e. the Baltic Science Link. Already strong research
fields in the region, life sciences, material technologies, would
form the core of these scientific clusters. Lead: Sweden: Swedish
Research Council. Deadline for progress review: 2015.
*
SUBMARINER Network – Actions and Initiatives for Sustainable and
Innovative Uses of Baltic Marine Resources. The project is a
transnational umbrella for activities focusing on sustainable and
innovative uses of Baltic marine resources. Based on the
SUBMARINER compendium (published in autumn 2012), it promotes new
uses and technologies that should be valued for their commercial
appeal and for their potentially significant contribution to
solving environmental problems. SUBMARINER Network implementation
is based on the roadmap (to be published in 2013), which
recommends what needs to be done at the BSR level in order to
realise the Europe 2020 Strategy aims in general and its maritime
pillar in particular. Lead: Ministry of Economic Affairs of the
Land Schleswig-Holstein/Germany; Co-leaders: Swedish Agency for
Marine and Water Management and the Maritime Institute in
Gdańsk/Poland. Deadline: 2020.
PA Internal Market – Removing hindrances to the internal market
---------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Estonia
Due to the small markets in the BSR, it is essential that appropriate
measures be taken to upgrade the business environment. A policy
framework conducive to investors and a dynamic business environment
offer the best options for sustaining high levels of development in
the west, and increasing levels in the eastern part of the Baltic Sea
rim. The current economic crisis makes it especially important to
stimulate further integration of the markets in the BSR.
It is also important to support and facilitate the development of
legitimate trade and economic cooperation, to combat customs fraud and
to enhance the security and safety of the supply chain in trade with
third countries. This requires, inter alia, a package of measures to
strengthen cooperation between customs authorities of the EU Member
States with Russia and other neighbouring countries, and to remove
procedural, staffing and infrastructural bottlenecks. Promotion of the
principles of good governance is needed to ensure fair and efficient
tax systems. This plays an essential role in ensuring a level playing
field for economic relations, trade and investment.
The poor trade relations established by SMEs in the BSR can be
explained by administrative burdens imposed by national legislation,
implementation of EU directives in an insufficient or non-transparent
way, limited competition in network industries due to unjustified
barriers for market entrants, strongly regulated labour markets, and
weak tax incentives. As a result there is often a lack of competition,
which translates as relatively high price levels.
Citizens and businesses do not always seize the many opportunities the
Single Market has to offer because the rules are not being transposed,
applied or enforced properly, or in the same way, in all Member
States. As shown in the latest Internal Market Scoreboard,36 although
Member States may have become much better in transposing Internal
Market legislation, but there are still problems with its correct
application, with a high number of reported open infringement cases.
Furthermore, citizens and businesses still do not have sufficient
information to use and enforce in practice their Single Market rights.37
An even greater effort should therefore be made to translate and
distribute material that in explains these clearly to the different
target groups.
Traded goods going outside the EU are experiencing serious
difficulties due to problems in the control procedures, and delays are
usually long at the EU border with Russia. Until recently, long queues
of lorries formed regularly at crossing points from Finland, Estonia
and Latvia. The main reason was the growth of EU-Russia trade,
complemented by inefficient procedures and inadequate infrastructure
on the Russian side. Although the congestion has decreased, enhanced
EU-Russia customs cooperation is important in ensuring trade
facilitation, while protecting citizens and combating fraud.
Today, goods aboard vessels which leave the customs territory of the
EU are normally assumed to be non-Union goods, unless the status of
Union goods can be satisfactorily demonstrated on arrival. This
applies irrespective of whether the goods have come from a European
country which is not a member of the EU, from another third country,
or come from elsewhere in the EU but have left the customs territory
en route. The same presumption that they are non-Union goods applies
to any goods on any type of means of transport which leaves the
customs territory of the EU.
Facilitations have already been introduced for maritime transport
(e.g. the presumption of Union status for goods transported on
authorised regular shipping services), but it is still considered by
the industry that vessels travelling between EU ports still encounter
a significant number of complex procedures which put intra-EU shipping
at a disadvantage in comparison to other transport modes, because
geographically they may have to leave the customs territory of the EU
even though on an intra-EU voyage.
That is particular manifest in the Baltic Sea region where, for
instance, 90% of Union goods moved to or from Finland are transported
by sea.
In order to establish a true internal market for Union goods carried
by ships in intra-EU trade, the Commission included in the Single
Market Act II ‘Together for new growth’ (COM(2012)573 final of
3.10.2012) a key action 2 aiming at establishing a true Single Market
for maritime transport by no longer subjecting EU goods transported
between EU seaports to the same administrative and customs formalities
that apply to goods arriving from third country ports.
That action will take the form of a ‘Blue Belt’ package with
legislative and non-legislative initiatives to be presented in the
second quarter of 2013.
Targeting further simplifications of administrative procedures,
especially customs procedures, the focus of discussions should be laid
on solving this problem of so called ‘infected vessels’.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the above indicators will be defined.
Sub-objectives
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Better information about rights and responsibilities following from
the Service Directive and Goods Package among citizens and
entrepreneurs.
Availability of Information on PCPs and PSCs for citizens and
entrepreneurs in embassies and Chambers of Commerce.
Year 2009, no relevant information available in embassies and Chambers
of Commerce in the Baltic Sea region.
Relevant information on PSCs and PCPs available in all embassies’ and
Chambers of Commerce’s websites in the Baltic Sea area.
Deadline TBC.
Swedish National Board of Trade.
Interoperability of cross-border e-services within the Baltic Sea
region.
Number of BSR countries and intensity of using interoperable
cross-border e-services applications.
Year 2009, no interoperable applications.
Active usage of cross-border e-services applications in all 8 BSR
countries.
TBC.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Open up the public sector to competition
Increase productivity in traditionally state and municipal services by
gradually further opening for free competition in such areas as waste
management, recreational activities, postal services, related
logistics and the broader communications sector, supply of local
energy etc. to secure full access to the respective markets in the
BSR.
Flagship projects
*
RECO Baltic 21 Tech. Harmonised approach to public procurement in
the BSR through waste management. Waste management is a matter of
central concern to Baltic Sea countries, where there are
significant disparities: whereas in Germany or Sweden around 3% of
household waste goes to disposal, the figure in Poland is over
90%. Insufficient transnational actions in the field of waste
management clearly hamper the development of this area in the BSR.
The project aims to address this problem by fostering sustainable
waste management (WM) in the BSR. The aim is to strengthen the
capacity of Baltic Sea countries to improve their waste
performance and meet the various EU directives. RB21T is also
expected to create innovative business opportunities in the
Clean-Tech industry. Operationally, RB21T will establish a
transnational and cross-sectoral platform for exchange of
expertise in waste management in the BSR, which will increase its
competitiveness. RB21T will directly target and assist 30 decision
makers on the local/regional and national level about to realise a
waste management investment, drawing on the latest research and
Best Available Technologies (BAT). Lead: Germany and Sweden.
Deadline: December 2013.
Action: Remove remaining unjustified barriers to the cross-border
provision of services
Timely and consistent implementation and application of the Services
Directive and other relevant directives, especially those affecting
SMEs and those aiming at the liberalisation of service markets (e.g.
the Third Postal Directive which sets a deadline for full market
opening by 31 December 2010 for the majority of Member States).
Besides requiring Member States to take concrete legislative measures,
the Directive asks them to put in place a variety of practical
measures such as Points of Single Contact for service providers,
electronic procedures and administrative cooperation. It also
introduces innovative tools, such as the review of national
legislation and the process of mutual evaluation. Close cooperation
between the bodies responsible in each Member State for implementing
the Services Directive has been established over the past two years
within the ‘Nordic-Baltic cooperation group’. This cooperation could
be further enhanced through exchanges of good practices, including for
setting up the Points of Single Contact, and through engaging business
associations in the process.
Flagship projects
*
Cross-border e-services in the Baltic Sea region. The Digital
Agenda for Europe (DAE) and the Single Market Act II (SMA II) have
both defined as a key element the need to overcome barriers in the
digital world and thus act as a driver for growth. It is not
enough to have very good e-solutions developed within Member
States if they are useful only for their own citizens. It can even
be seen as discriminatory and contradicts with the logic of an
increasingly mobile world. A fully functioning Digital Single
Market in 2015 will require that all persons (including legal
persons) to be able to operate in the digital space across
borders. In addition to the ongoing study by the European
Commission on the barriers to cross-border services in the EU
(analysis of the needs for cross-border services and assessment of
the organisational, legal, technical and semantic barriers38) and
the ongoing and upcoming EU-wide Large-Scale Projects (STORK II,
eSens and etc.) there is a need for bilateral discussion between
neighbouring Member States to select priority areas where
cross-border services give the most value, based on their current
socio-economic situation and ongoing relations between countries.
The goal of the current flagship project is to foster the
introduction of new cross-border services in the BSR. Tasks of the
project are to facilitate discussions between Member States in the
Baltic Sea region to understand the needs for cross-border
services from specific neighbouring Member States points of view,
analyse the possibilities to implement cross-border services using
existing infrastructure or by expanding local solutions across
borders, share experiences about solutions for cross-border
services and select areas where additional resources are required
for overcoming existing barriers. Lead: Estonia. Deadline for
progress review: December 2013.
Action: Make the EU internal market work on the ground for the Baltic
Sea Region
Enhanced cooperation between national authorities in managing the
Single Market. Improved and increased administrative cooperation
between national authorities in the BSR on the implemen­tation of
Single Market Directives should be developed, with the ‘Nordic-Baltic
cooperation group’ for the Services Directive serving as an
inspiration. National authorities are also encouraged to cooperate
within the BSR on the provision of training in single market law to
national civil servants and court officials; and on the provision of
information to citizens and businesses about their rights and
opportunities in the Internal Market. Such close cooperation on Single
Market issues between the authorities of the BSR should be developed
in the context of and in line with the Commission’s Recommendation on
Partnerships, which was adopted in June 2009.
Flagship projects
*
Remove remaining single market unjustified barriers by
strengthening the practical cooperation between the responsible
authorities. The project divided between 2 leaders, and initially
consisting of 5 areas, in embracing 3 modules:
1.
Identification of the internal market unjustified barriers to
trade between the countries of the region. Lead: Poland.39 The
general objective to be achieved under the project should be
to collect extensive information on the unjustified barriers
on the internal market which hinder the free movement of
persons, goods, services and capital between the countries of
the region. The study paper of the barriers will be based,
inter alia, on the analysis of the SOLVIT cases.
2.
Exchange of best practices on the practical functioning of
Product Contact Points and Points of Single Contact. Lead:
Sweden.40 The project aims to provide a platform for exchanges
of experience on establishing, financing and developing the
contact points in the Baltic Sea region. Several network
meetings have been held. It was pointed out that there are
significant differences between Member States as regards on
how national product contact points satisfy the requirements
in the Regulation 764/2008.
3.
Networking on general internal market issues – general
competence of the participants, depending on countries’
interests and engagement.
Lead: Poland and Sweden. Deadline for progress review: 2015.
*
Encourage sharing of competences between accreditation bodies.
Cooperation between accreditation bodies could be a cost-effective
way of sharing competence and offering a wide range of
accreditation services to companies, without having all the
facilities in each Member State. Lead: Sweden – Swedish Board for
Accreditation and Conformity Assessment. Deadline for progress
review: 2015.
PA Nutri – Reducing nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Finland and Poland
http://groupspaces.com/eusbsr-nutrient-inputs/
Of the many environmental challenges facing the Baltic Sea, the most
serious and difficult to tackle with conventional approaches is the
continuing eutrophication, which is caused by excessive nutrient
inputs. Nitrogen and phosphorous loads to the Baltic Sea have
increased several folds over the last century, reaching the Sea
through agricultural run-off and leaching inadequately treated sewage
and through airborne emissions from traffic and combustion processes.
The effects of eutrophication are particularly acute in the southern
and eastern parts of the Baltic Sea. The impacts of eutrophication
include oxygen depletion, reduced water clarity, an increase in
filamentous algae, summer blooms of cyanobacteria (blue green algae)
and negative effects on the benthic community.
The latest decades’ large-scale investments in waste-water treatment
plants and key decisions on cleaner shipping have had an important
impact on decreasing the nutrient load. However, to save the sea,
further and continued action is needed,41 especially in the
agricultural sector, on which progress in nutrient loads reduction
greatly depends now. Full implementation of the relevant EU
legislation is necessary in restoring the ecosystem status of the sea.
This legislation includes the Water Framework Directive,42 Nitrates
Directive,43 Urban Waste Water Directive,44 Industrial Emissions
Directive45, as well as the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.46 In
addition, reinforcement of some measures adopted under these
Directives has become apparent and must take place without further
delay. In particular it is worth noting that the Nitrates Directive is
insufficiently implemented both as regards Nitrates Vulnerable Zone
designation and Action Programmes. Also, the measures agreed upon in
the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) of the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM),
going beyond the requirements of EU legislation, must be implemented,
which is currently at varying stages in the different countries
concerned.
Cooperation should be promoted with a broad range of stakeholders,
including other priority areas and actors in non-EU Member States in
the region, in order to take advantage of the cross-cutting nature of
the EUSBSR, to reach the objectives of the MSFD and other relevant
legislation and to ensure stakeholders’ commitment to the reduction of
nutrient emissions into the sea. As agriculture is the most important
source of diffuse nutrient loads into the Baltic Sea, priority area
‘Agri’ is a particularly important stakeholder for priority area
‘Nutri’. Cooperation between the two priority areas is facilitated
inter alia under the Agriculture and Environment Forum of HELCOM.
The main problems can be summarised as follows:
*
Continued and increasing nutrient loads into the Baltic Sea:
*
insufficient recycling of nutrients;
*
insufficient nutrient removal in urban waste water treatment
plants;
*
structural changes in agricultural production, including
centralisation of domestic animal farms and oversupply of manure
in some areas;
*
difficulties in achieving rapid results due to for instance the
complex cycle of nutrients, especially phosphorus, the long time
lag between implementing the measure and observing an effect in
the water, and the slow turnover of the water in the sea;
*
increases in run-off and thus eutrophication and other impacts due
to climate change.
*
Challenges in cooperation across the macro-region:
*
varying levels of commitment to implement the BSAP;
*
lack of clear support at the highest political level;
*
conflicting policy targets of environmental and agricultural
policies;
*
differing views on country-wide nutrient reduction requirements;
*
low awareness of costs-efficiency of nutrient load-reducing
measures;
*
low awareness of costs and benefits of reaching the objectives of
BSAP;
*
difficulties in monitoring nutrient loads from diffuse sources;
*
difficulties with providing HELCOM with accurate data due to lack
of institutional capacity in some countries;
*
challenges in coordinating efforts with third countries.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target
Data sources
Clear water in the sea.
Nutrient (P, N) inputs (tons).
Nutrient (P, N) input into the Baltic Sea (HELCOM BSAP baseline 1997 –
2003 average, reviewed 2013)
- per sub-region
- per country
- point sources
- diffuse sources
- airborne Nitrogen.
Total nutrient reduction by 2016 as agreed in BSAP 2007 and revised by
HELCOM in 2013.
HELCOM data (PLC-water, PLC-air/EMEP).
Annual HELCOM Core pressure indicator for eutrophication (after 2013).
Clear water in the sea; rich and healthy wildlife.
Sea-area (km2, %) in good ecosystem status by eutrophication
descriptors of EU Marine Strategy Directive.
Initial assessments as required by MSFD.
Whole Baltic Sea area in good ecological status by 2020.
Country reports 2012, 2018.
Jointly – HELCOM Core indicators.
N.B. All Member States have to comply with the objectives under
relevant EU legislation (MSFD, WFD, UWWTD, NiD, EEA, JRC). However,
the cooperation process under this priority area will facilitate the
achievement of the targets above.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Improving waste water treatment
Promote cost-efficient nutrient removal and sustainable sludge
handling in urban waste-water treatment plants and in small-scale
waste-water treatment. Focusing on municipal waste water continues to
be beneficial for two reasons: there is significant potential to
reduce nutrient loads by proper treatment of waste water and by
reducing occasional and seasonal bypasses; and improving waste-water
treatment is still a cost-efficient mean to reduce nutrient loads.
Flagship projects
*
PRESTO. The project aims to significantly reduce the nutrient load
to the Baltic Sea through education programmes for the operating
staff, designers and academic trainers involved in waste-water
treatment as well as technical studies and investments in selected
Belarusian waste-water treatment plants (Baranovichi, Grodno,
Molodechno and Vitebsk). Lead: Union of the Baltic Cities,
Commission on Environment. Deadline: March 2014.
Action: Managing nutrients more efficiently
Promote measures and practices which support nutrient recycling and
reduce nutrient losses from farming, fisheries, forestry, and
waste-water treatment sludge. Additional Rural Development measures
could be used to advance nutrient recycling, reduce nutrient run-off
and leaching, reduce erosion and increase the retention capacity in
the landscape. Intensively used agricultural land and areas with high
domestic animal density should be focused on first. This action will
contribute to full implementation of and reinforce measures adopted
under the Nitrates Directive. It will also promote the full
implementation by farmers of these measures, by increasing support
through extension services and better controls.
Flagship projects
*
Putting best agricultural practices into work – the Baltic Deal.
The challenge of farm nutrient run-off and leakage eventually
entering the Baltic Sea is recognised by the farming community.
The Baltic Deal was initiated by five farmers’ federations as a
voluntary sector response. Lead: Latvian Rural Advisory and
Training Centre and Federation of Swedish Farmers. Deadline:
end-2013.
Action: Facilitate cross-sectoral policy-oriented dialogue
Facilitate cross-sectoral policy-oriented dialogue among all sectors
with an impact on eutrophication to develop an integrated approach to
reducing nutrient loads to the sea. Supporting communication between
actors can help align the different perceptions of eutrophication and
find new ways for the integrated management of nutrient fluxes. For
example, currently the consumption side is rarely addressed when
discussing nutrient loads from agriculture, even though changes in
consumption could result in remarkable reductions in nutrient loads.
Enhancing cross-sectoral dialogue requires co-operation with other
priority areas, e.g. with priority area ‘Agri’ regarding
agro-environmental dialogue. Possible platforms for such dialogue
include the HELCOM Agriculture and Environment Forum and the annual
conference ‘A Greener Agriculture for a Bluer Baltic Sea’. Also, the
Baltic Impulse Cluster initiative of the EU Baltic Sea Region
Programme will bring together inputs from various projects on
eutrophication. In addition to international and national dialogue,
local and e.g. river-basin level cooperation, such as water users’
partnerships, is encouraged.
Flagship projects
Stakeholders are encouraged to develop flagship project ideas under
the theme ‘Agriculture and Environment Policy’. Possibilities for
organising common roundtable discussions and/or workshops for
agricultural producers and policy-makers will be investigated, for
instance in cooperation with agricultural exhibitions in different
countries in the region. Cooperation possibilities for joint events
with the HELCOM Agriculture and Environment Forum as well as priority
are ‘Agri’ will likewise be investigated.
Action: Investigate cost-efficient nutrient reduction mechanisms
Study and cooperate in developing new sustainable innovative and
socio-economic means for cost-efficient nutrient reductions. These
tools could include new mechanisms to allocate the cost of nutrient
reduction to the Baltic Sea region countries in a fair and efficient
way (e.g. through emission trading) as well as restorative techniques
to improve the environmental status of the Baltic Sea, provided these
techniques pass sustainability and risk assessment procedures.
Flagship projects
To progress work on this action, discussion will be held with
stakeholders, for instance in the priority area steering committee,
with the aim of examining possibilities for targeted events and new
flagship projects.
Action: Cooperate with non-EU Member States
Cooperate with non-EU Member States, particularly Russia and Belarus,
through HELCOM and the Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership.
Flagship projects
*
PRESTO (see action ‘Improving waste water treatment’).
*
Assessment of regional nutrient pollution load and identification
of priority projects to reduce nutrient inputs from Belarus to the
Baltic Sea. The project identifies priority investments and builds
local capacity in the reduction of nutrient inputs to the Baltic
Sea in the context of the Northern Dimension Environmental
Partnership, with particular focus on agriculture, municipal
waste-water and industry, including the production and use of
detergents containing phosphorus. Lead: NEFCO. Deadline: 2013.
Action: Improve nutrient load data
Support efforts to improve the completeness and reliability of
nutrient load data as a basis for monitoring success in reducing
nutrient loads. Data collection processes are currently insufficient,
which precludes a full understanding of the eutrophication situation
in the Baltic Sea. HELCOM works to ensure that nutrient pollution
assessments are harmonised across the region.
Flagship projects
Opportunities to launch a flagship project in cooperation with HELCOM
to support Baltic Sea-wide compilation and assessment of nutrient
pollution load data with additional measures to improve its quality,
completeness and consistency, including preparatory work for
harmonising reporting to HELCOM on relevant EU directives will be
investigated.
Priority area on Maritime Safety and Security
PA Safe – To become a leading region in maritime safety and security
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Denmark and Finland
http://pa13.dma.dk
The Baltic Sea region is heavily dependent on shipping for internal
trade as well as for imports and exports. Consequently, the Baltic Sea
is one of the most heavily trafficked seas in the world. The volume of
shipping in the region has been growing in recent years and represents
up to 15% of the world’s cargo traffic. This traffic is expected to
increase further in the years to come.
Moreover, due to its strategic position, the Baltic Sea region is a
natural route for oil transport, in particular from Russia. The amount
of oil transported through the Baltic Sea is considerable. Between
2000 and 2007, oil shipments via the Great Belt of Denmark more than
doubled to reach 171 mt. Despite the financial crisis, the traffic has
remained at a high level, and amounted to 167 mt in 2011.47 As regards
oil shipments in the Gulf of Finland, the amount was some 160 mt in
2010 compared to 80 mt in 2000.48 The growth in oil transport is
expected to continue for some time.
While there is a trend towards larger tankers, the number of laden
tankers is also growing. In 2005, approximately 2706 tankers passed
the Great Belt. By 2011, this number had grown to 5672 tankers49.
There is also an increasing trend towards transport of liquefied
natural gas (LNG) by LNG carriers.
The waters of the Baltic Sea are, however, not the easiest to
navigate. The sea is generally quite shallow and the entrance to the
sea is limited to the curved and narrow straits of Denmark and the
Kiel Canal, which is the world’s busiest artificial waterway. During
winter, ice-covered waters cause difficult navigation conditions that
affect the safety and reliability of maritime transport. At the same
time, the sea is environmentally fragile due to its semi-closed waters
and densely populated shores. If anything goes wrong, it is essential
to have well-functioning search and rescue services and oil spill
response capacity in place to save human lives and reduce marine
pollution.
A high level of maritime safety and security contributes to the
overall objectives of the EUSBSR to clean the sea and to increase
prosperity, and can be obtained partly through strengthened regional
cooperation. The vision is that the Baltic Sea should become a leading
region in maritime safety and security.
The current high level and expected growth in vessel traffic increases
the risk that there will be more accidents in the future unless
improved maritime safety and security procedures are set in place. At
the core of the required procedural improvements are traffic
management and traffic control measures involving the monitoring of
ship movements, with the aim of preventing the development of
dangerous situations.
Maritime surveillance data collected by different maritime authorities
often serve a specific purpose for an individual sector. Better
information sharing between sectors and across borders is therefore
needed. It would result in more efficient use of resources as well as
improved safety, increased environmental protection and security at
sea, better protection of EU sea borders and more efficient accident
response. Under International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations,
search and rescue services are organised by the Member States
individually, which may result in overlaps in planning, limited
capacity sharing, insufficiently coordinated surveillance and a lack
of agreed standards and terminology in operational and educational
areas.
It is in the interest of all countries bordering the Baltic Sea to
reduce the risk of maritime accidents and marine pollution, including
hazardous spills. More efficient and more compatible surveillance,
monitoring and routing systems, in particular at the level of sea
basins, as outlined in the EU Integrated Maritime Policy, would
significantly improve maritime safety and security.
Furthermore, the human factor is a complex multi-dimensional issue
affecting the well-being of people at sea and having direct
implications for maritime safety and security and for the marine
environment. Addressing this issue, partly through improved training,
could reduce the number of shipping accidents in the Baltic Sea
region.
There is already a platform for regional cooperation on maritime
safety and security within the HELCOM cooperation, based on the
Helsinki Convention50, which addresses a wide range of issues
pertaining to the safety of navigation and oil spill response
preparedness in the Baltic Sea region. According to the Convention,
HELCOM’s role includes acting as a platform for harmonised regional
implementation of IMO regulations. Also other regional fora have
activities at practical or at policy level. Naturally, existing forms
of cooperation need to be taken into account in order to identify gaps
and create synergies and avoid duplicating efforts in the region.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/
sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Policy objective:
Reduction in the number of maritime accidents.
Number of maritime accidents.
2009 (average between 2009 – 2012 of the number of accidents in a
period of 3-5 years).
Measurable reduction/decreasing trend in the number of maritime
accidents per 1000 ships by 2020.
HELCOM annual statistics.
Cooperative objective 1:
Improved long-term planning.
Development and usage of joint, regional scenario for maritime safety
and security.
Baseline/target year: 2011 (year of decision to undertake joint
regional scenario).
Regular update of the scenario from 2013 onwards.
Scenarios for the development of maritime safety and security in the
Baltic Sea region published by the priority area coordinators in 2012.
Cooperative objective 2:
Increased cross-border and cross-sector cooperation and information
sharing among maritime authorities and other relevant stakeholders to
improve maritime safety and security.
Implementation of the flagship projects results and recommendations.
Situation in 2009, before the projects/EUSBSR started.
By 2020 the creation of 1) a Common Information Sharing Environment
(CISE) among maritime authorities and coast guard functions; 2) a
permanent regional cooperation framework for coastguard functions, 3)
a Baltic Sea region e-Navigation Forum of experts.
TBC.
Actions and flagship projects
Policy discussions and alignment of policies
The following actions of the priority area on maritime safety and
security are important if the vision of the Baltic Sea region as a
leading region in terms of maritime safety and security is to be
realised. The actions are to be pursued through the ongoing policy
dialogue in the priority area as well as through the flagship
projects. In addition to those projects mentioned below, the priority
area coordinators will regularly consider proposals for new flagship
projects that have a high macro-regional impact, contribute to
fulfilling the objectives of the EUSBSR and are related to the
implementation of one or more priority area actions.
The actions are in line with a number of other international and EU
policies, including, but not limited to:
*
the work of the International Maritime Organization (IMO);
*
the Integrated Maritime Policy of the European Union;
*
the work of the Helsinki Commission, in particular its Baltic Sea
Action Plan adopted in 2007;
*
the activities of other regional fora, such as the Council of the
Baltic Sea States (CBSS), the Baltic Sea Parliamentary Conference,
the Baltic Sea Hydrographic Commission;
*
the work of the International Association of Aids to Navigation
and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA) regarding the development of
e-Navigation etc.
The work of the priority area serves to reinforce and supplement these
policies at the regional level, while avoiding duplication of efforts.
Cross-cutting activities supporting all actions of the priority area:
Flagship projects
*
To create a centre for knowledge and innovation in the field of
maritime safety and security. The project aims to increase
knowledge transfer between different groups of stakeholders in the
field of maritime safety and security. The ambition is to make
better use of the results and recommendations of completed,
ongoing and upcoming projects in the field, and thereby stimulate
innovation and entrepreneurship, and to create new ideas and
products in the Baltic Sea region. This will be done by
facilitating long-term cooperation between different groups of
stakeholders and projects in the field of maritime safety and
security (Baltic Maritime Science Park project). Lead: Blekinge
Region, Sweden and Blekinge Institute of Technology. Deadline: 31
December 2014.
Action: Create a common maritime management system and monitoring,
information and intelligence sharing environment for the Baltic Sea,
in compliance with developments at EU level
Create an integrated network of reporting and surveillance systems for
all maritime activities, such as maritime safety, maritime security,
protection of the marine environment, fisheries control, customs,
border control and law enforcement, while respecting relevant data
protection requirements. In addition, identify any gaps and
inconsistencies in fields where cooperation between civil and military
entities exist, or could be developed in the future. The network
should build on existing and future system integration initiatives and
pilots, taking into account developments at EU level.
Implementation of the recommendations on improved information sharing
between maritime authorities from the successfully completed Maritime
Surveillance North and Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities projects
will contribute to the establishment of permanent information sharing
among Member States’ authorities at EU level. This is further
developed through Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and
Fisheries (DG MARE) cooperation and the Directorate-General for
Enterprise and Industry (DG ENTR) surveillance projects. Member States
are encouraged to participate actively in the implementation and
follow-up of these projects. This would i.a. create basis for further
cooperation projects under the priority area ‘Crime’.
Flagship projects should be developed to implement this action.
Proposals for new projects are particularly welcome in these fields:
*
testing best practices for cooperation between policy, customs,
border control, maritime search and rescue authorities in the
Baltic Sea states. This includes establishing a common definition
of sectoral risk analysis in order to promote the allocation of
operational resources.
Action: Improve the coordination of systems relating to ships’ routing
and monitoring of the vessel traffic and consider establishing new
systems
Further improve coordination and information-sharing mechanisms
between existing systems to ensure their effective interoperability.
Coastal states should jointly consider whether new measures
(routing/traffic separation schemes/mandatory reporting systems)
should be introduced. Decisions on these measures should be based on
the analysis of the risks and effectiveness of the measures based on a
formal safety assessment and research projects. Jointly utilise
improved satellite navigation systems, such as Galileo, to support
maritime positioning and navigation, especially for Automatic
Identification Systems (AIS), Vessel Traffic Management Systems (VMS),
hazardous-cargo monitoring, for port approaches, ports and restricted
waters and for search and rescue safety systems.
Flagship projects
*
Speed up re-surveying of major shipping routes and ports, as
agreed in HELCOM, in order to ensure that the safety of navigation
is not put at risk through inadequate source information. Lead:
HELCOM in cooperation with the International Hydrographic
Organisation via its Baltic Sea Hydrographic Commission. Deadline
for progress review: 2013.
*
Development of shipping routes and e-Navigation in the Baltic Sea.
The project aims to make a concrete contribution to efficient,
safe and environmentally friendly maritime transport. This will be
done through the development, demonstration and dissemination of
innovative e-Navigational services to the shipping industry, which
can lay the groundwork for future international deployment.
Another main activity under this flagship project will be to
undertake a quality assurance of hydrographic data for the major
navigational areas in the Swedish and Finnish waters of the Baltic
Sea, which, together with other pilot actions, will help enhance
the safety of navigation and optimisation of shipping routes.
(Motorways and electronic navigation by intelligence at sea
(MONALISA) project, which has a budget of 22.4 million EUR and is
50% co-financed by the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T)
programme. Lead: Swedish Maritime Administration. Deadline: 31
December 2013.
Action: Jointly apply surveillance tools
Joint surveillance tools should include coastal radars, Automatic
Identification System (AIS), Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS), Long
Range Identification and Tracking of Ships (LRIT), earth observation
satellites and maritime patrol, in the Baltic Sea region. Member
States in the region and the European Maritime Safety Agency will
continue to cooperate on tracing illegal discharges by ships.51 There
should be further dialogue between the relevant authorities, including
the armed forces, to investigate the possibility of operating jointly
national assets at regional level.
Flagship projects may be developed to implement this action.
Action: Winter navigation
Improve the safety, efficiency and environmental sustainability of
winter navigation through enhanced cooperation between relevant
authorities, transport operators and research institutes. Examples of
strategic areas of cooperation: development of methods for conducting
Formal Safety Assessments; optimisation of the infrastructure for
winter navigation including icebreaking resources; ensuring the
necessary icebreaking capacity and developing intelligent transport
systems (ITS) solutions for winter navigation.
Flagship projects
*
Ensure Safe and Efficient Winter Navigation in the Baltic Sea
region. The project aims to improve the efficiency, safety and
environmental performance of winter navigation in the Baltic Sea.
It aims to meet current and future challenges by ensuring
appropriate icebreaking resources for the Baltic Sea region and
developing cooperative actions to improve the functionality of the
winter navigation system. Winter Navigation Motorways of the Sea
(WINMOS) project. Lead: Swedish Maritime Administration. Deadline:
31 December 2014.
Action: Ensure that vessels, in particular those transporting
polluting (such as oil) and dangerous goods are up to the highest
maritime safety standards, in the context of potential safety
requirements for the transport of new types of propulsion fuels.
Flagship projects
*
Minimising the risk of transportation of dangerous goods by sea.
Oil transportation in the Baltic Sea poses a transnational risk to
the marine environment. Maritime oil transportation is also
vulnerable to security threats. In order to effectively compare
different management options for safety systems, a detailed
assessment of the current state of the system is needed. In
addition, risk assessments based on realistic traffic growth
scenarios, accident probabilities and their likely consequences
are essential to evaluate the options. (‘Minimising risks of
maritime oil transport by holistic safety strategies’ (MIMIC) is
an international project which is led by Finland and co-financed
by the European Territorial Cooperation IV A Central Baltic
Programme). Lead: Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Finland.
Deadline for progress review: December 2013.
Potential flagship projects
*
Conduct a formal risk assessment for liquefield natural gas (LNG)
carriers and port infrastructure (possibly including bunker and
cargo operations) in the Baltic Sea area. Maritime transportation
of LNG for energy consumption has become an increasingly important
market, also for the Baltic Sea region. Experience with accidents
relating to LNG ships and LNG terminals is very limited. There is
a need for a formal risk assessment (FSA) of this type of maritime
transportation within the Baltic Sea region. The purpose is to
identify any preventive measures and regulations in relation to
safety and security. The FSA should involve both government and
industry stakeholders and have scope to develop model procedures,
contingency plans, guidelines and legislative incentives. Lead: to
be determined. Project makers are encouraged to submit proposals
for action in this field of work under this priority area.
Action: Ensure that crews serving onboard vessels are well trained,
i.a. in the framework of EU efforts on quality shipping and in the
light of the third EU maritime safety package adopted in 2009. Most
accidents happen due to human error, a factor that can be counteracted
partly through increasing the competence of seafarers.
Flagship projects
*
Develop a plan to reduce the number of accidents in fisheries.
This could be achieved by improving the way information on
accidents is gathered and analysed, enhanced training and
awareness programmes, the sharing of best practices or the
development of specific measures to increase the safety of
fishermen. Lead: Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council. Deadline
for progress review: 2014.
More flagship projects may be developed to implement this action.
PA Secure – Protection from emergencies and accidents on land
-------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Sweden and the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS)
Secretariat
http://www.cbss.org/Civil-Security-and-the-Human-Dimension/priority-area-14
The core issue for this priority area is civil protection cooperation
in a macro-regional and cross-border context where: a) countries are
linked to each other through geographic proximity, functional
interdependencies or other mechanisms; b) assistance capacity is
needed; or c) joint approaches and cross-border learning processes
would clearly bring added value.
A macro-regional civil protection strategy should be based on an
all-hazard approach and include the whole cycle of civil protection,
i.e. prevention, preparedness, response and restoration. It should
focus on hazards and emergencies, build on the cooperation within the
EU Civil Protection Mechanism and take into account EU cooperation in
the area of prevention, including the European Commission’s
communication ‘A Community approach on the prevention of natural and
man-made disasters’ and follow up Council Conclusions on risk
prevention and risk assessment.
Climate change is expected to increase the likelihood of extreme
weather events occurring at a shorter interval in the future. Other
emergencies with cross-border effects could result from natural and
technological disasters, acts of terrorism including chemical,
biological, radiological and nuclear terrorism, and technological,
radiological or environmental accidents as well as health threats from
communicable and non-communicable diseases. Emergencies and major
hazards notwithstanding the Baltic Sea region also bear great cost in
the form of everyday accidents that cause mortality, morbidity and
disability. Within the region, there are huge disparities in mortality
caused by everyday accidents depending on the country, region,
vulnerable group and environment. Injuries caused by everyday
accidents do not ‘just happen’, rather, something in the behavioural
cultures, physical environments or health systems affect considerably
the number of injuries and their consequences and thus they are
preventable.
More efficient mutual assistance and continued Baltic Sea cooperation
on prevention, preparedness and response in the field of civil
protection can contribute to improving the capabilities of the Member
States to address cross-border hazards or emergencies in the region as
well as improving the safety of their citizens in local communities.
It is also important to mobilise all the forces of the societies to
raise awareness of the public for instance an initiative such as APELL
(Awareness and Preparedness for Emergencies at the Local Level) that
together with other similar bottom-up processes, this should be fully
applied to the Baltic Sea region. This experience could also serve as
a model for capacity building in other macro-regions.
Work in this priority area is to be transparent, open, and build on
existing achievements of civil protection cooperation in the Baltic
Sea region. In that spirit, the CBSS Civil Protection Expert Network
provides expert knowledge. Taking into account recommendations of the
CBSS Civil Protection Network, an international and representative
Advisory Group has been established, in order to provide support and
guidance to the priority area coordinator. This group is open ‘to
other partners, including representatives of third countries, willing
to contribute to the work of the Advisory Group’. In addition, the
coordinators of this priority area will seek cooperation with those of
other priority areas and horizontal actions, notably priority area
‘Safe’ which has many common issues that can be explored as well as
priority areas ‘Agri’ and ‘Health’ and horizontal actions ‘Spatial
planning’, ‘Neighbours’, ‘Involve’ and ‘Sustainable development’.
Other connections will also be made to exchange ideas and best
practices between projects from different priority areas.
Indicators and targets
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/
sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Tailored macro-regional INTEROPERABILTIY between the rescue services
in national and cross-border cooperation in the BSR.
Joint training and exercises, explicitly aimed at enhancing
interoperability.
Situation in 2012: no targeted training.
Training and exercises launched by 2014.
PAC report on priority area implementation.
INSTITUTIONALIZED cooperation on civil protection in the BSR.
Number of BSR countries participating in macro-regional operational
structures.
Situation in 2012:
(1) Existing bilateral and trilateral cooperation processes and
agreements.
(2) Established Nordic cooperation on civil protection (on land and at
sea), nuclear safety and maritime safety, including agreements.
(3) Functional Council of the Baltic Sea States Civil Protection
Network.
Full participation of all BSR countrie in a demand driven forum for
evaluating macro-regional risks and launching relevant Baltic Sea
region-wide projects/by 2020.
Clear definition of standard operation procedures when cross-border
assistance is requested/by 2014.
PAC report
Feasibility study on Institutionalisation of the EUSBSR priority area
14 (EUSBSR Action Plan 2009) to be completed in 1st half of 2013.
BSR – Leader in Civil Protection Cooperation among macro-regions of
the EU.
Number of participants in the Baltic Leadership Programme.
Situation in 2012: no programme in place.
Baltic Leadership programme reached representatives in all BSR
countries/by 2014.
Priority area coordinator PA Secure
The Swedish Institute – Baltic Leadership Programme
reports/statistics.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Develop a joint macro-regional prevention and preparedness
approach towards major hazards and emergencies
Develop methodologies for enhanced cooperation between different
local, regional and national agencies with a role in emergency
operations relating to major hazards and emergencies, and on how to
increase synergies with the EU Civil Protection Mechanism. Cooperation
methodologies should be defined broadly and include public awareness
actions, contingency planning, disaster scenarios, communication
systems and tools, including early warning systems, use of technology,
joint exercises and training.
Flagship projects
*
Develop risk scenarios based on risk assessments and identify gaps
for all main hazards in the Baltic Sea region in order to
anticipate potential disasters, thus enabling a rapid and
effective EU response through the EU Civil Protection Mechanism.
Lead: Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat. Deadline for
progress review: January 2013.
*
Strengthen training activities and exercises in cooperation with
the countries of the Baltic Sea region, including on disaster risk
prevention and management. Based on the project develop scenarios
and identify gaps, and drawing on existing possibilities for
funding sources under the Civil Protection Financial Instrument.
Lead: Council of the Baltic Sea States Secretariat and/or the
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB). Deadline for progress
review: to be determined.
Proposal from the Commission for a flagship project
Develop a regional disaster loss database for all main hazards of the
Baltic Sea region in order to improve the knowledge base and exchange
of information, and inform the decision makers on the main areas for
which a common risk assessment method should be developed. Lead: to be
determined. Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
Action: Enhance a joint urban safety and prevention approach in the
Baltic Sea region
Many communities in the Baltic Sea region face similar risks.
Therefore, raising awareness and enhancing prevention is of outmost
importance. In many cases however the best new practices are learned
through transnational cooperation. The Baltic Sea region has several
transnational networks of cities, regions and other local actors that
would be natural networks for developing transnational awareness
raising, prevention strategies, urban safety and safe community
approaches.
Potential flagship projects
*
Applying APELL (Awareness and Preparedness for Emergencies at the
Local Level) to address everyday accidents in the Baltic Sea
region. Lead: Member States and/or inter-governmental body to be
determined.52 Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
*
Effective learning and exchanging best practices on urban safety
through a local city network. The network fosters urban safety
exchanges throughout Baltic Sea region on locally-developed
know-how strategies, shares experiences, analyzes functions and
activities of municipalities and develops new safety management in
the cities more oriented towards the needs of local communities.
Lead: Union of the Baltic Cities (UBC) Commission on Local Safety.
Deadline for progress review: to be determined.
Action: Foster dialogue and common approaches to civil protection in
the Baltic Sea region
A thorough knowledge and understanding of national and international
(including EU) systems and funding possibilities is critical for civil
protection actors and other stakeholders in the Baltic Sea region.
This is a necessary precondition for the joint organisation of
activities that encourage knowledge transfer and information sharing
through formal and informal education and training as well as the
development of joint procedures and standards. It has the potential to
encourage initiatives focusing on new areas and ways of cooperation
such as between authorities with different competencies and
jurisdictions and public-private partnerships.
Flagship projects
*
Form a network of key civil protection actors in the Baltic Sea
region through the ‘Baltic Leadership Programme’ and equip them
with the tools and information needed to manage cross-border
collaboration and projects between diverse organisations in an
intercultural context. Lead: Swedish Institute. Deadline for
progress review: 30 June 2013.
Priority Area on Clean Shipping
PA Ship – Becoming a model region for clean shipping
----------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Denmark
http://pa4.dma.dk
In the Baltic Sea region, maritime transport constitutes an important
backbone for trade. At any given moment, there are more than 2000
ships operating in the Baltic Sea. Both the number and the size of
vessels have been growing in recent years and it currently represents
up to 15% of the world’s cargo traffic. Moreover, the vessel traffic
is predicted to increase further in the years to come.
At the same time, the Baltic Sea is environmentally fragile due to its
shallow, semi-closed waters and densely populated shores. Shipping is
a very effective mode of transport when measured in emissions per
tonnes of cargo; however, maritime transport is a major source of air
pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. While being economically
inexpensive and environmentally friendly if measured per tonnes of
transported goods, shipping can have negative effects on the
environment through air emissions, and the illegal and accidental
discharge of oil, hazardous substances and other wastes. Another
important pressure due to shipping is the introduction of alien
organisms via ships’ ballast water and hull fouling, which can have
very serious negative impacts on the ecologically fragile Baltic Sea
and its endemic species.
New technology to reduce emissions from ships’ engines is currently
being developed, and simultaneously less polluting fuels are being
tested. In fact, the Baltic Sea region is home to global champions in
shipping and maritime equipment manufacturing.
In 2005, the Baltic Sea was designated by the International Maritime
Organization (IMO) as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area and as the
first special SOx Emission Control Area (SECA) with limits on sulphur
emissions under the MARPOL Convention53 (Annex VI). This provides a
solid basis for implementing measures to ensure the sustainability of
shipping in the Baltic Sea. In view of the essential importance of
maritime traffic in the Baltic Sea and the harmful effects on the
marine environment, it is necessary for the countries in the Baltic
Sea region to act jointly to minimise ship-based pollution, while
maximising the positive impact of maritime transport on the region.
The rapid designation of a NOx emission control area (NECA) in the
Baltic Sea is also key to reducing eutrophication and air pollution
and promoting clean shipping in the region. The priority area on
‘clean shipping’, together with the Baltic Marine Environment
Protection Commission (HELCOM), acts as a forum for relevant
stakeholders to secure the coordination and cooperation on these
goals.
Cleaner shipping in the Baltic Sea and a high level of competence in
clean shipping technology in the region contributes to reaching the
overall objectives of the Strategy to clean the sea and to increase
prosperity, and can be achieved in part through strengthened regional
cooperation. The vision is that the Baltic Sea should become a model
region for clean shipping.
The development of maritime spatial planning in the Baltic Sea region
has the potential to enhance measures of clean and safe shipping.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Policy objective: Reducing emissions from the shipping in the Baltic
Sea, while at the same it is predicted that the intensity of maritime
activities will increase.
Indicator: Annual emissions from vessel traffic in the Baltic Sea,
based on estimates from the Automatic Identification System, which
monitors vessel movement.
Emissions in 2009.
Overall decreasing trend in emissions.
HELCOM annual statistics.
Cooperative objective: Establishment of upgraded reception facilities
for sewage in passenger ports of the Baltic Sea through exchange of
experiences and best practices, investments and cooperation between
shipping industry, ports and municipal wastewater treatment plants.
Number of new ports with upgraded reception facilities for sewage.
First and second priority ports for upgrading according to the HELCOM
Road Map adopted by the 2010 Ministerial Meeting.
http://www.helcom.fi/stc/files/Moscow2010/PortReceptionFacilities.pdf
Port reception facilities are upgraded by 2015 at the latest, the
International Maritime Organization is notified accordingly, leading
to the enforcement of the ban for untreated sewage discharge under the
Baltic Sea Special Area of MARPOL Annex IV.
HELCOM (Cooperation Platform on port reception facilities).
Policy discussions and alignment of policies
Whilst it is preferable for international shipping regulations to be
adopted at global level within the International Maritime Organization
(IMO), the EU will continue to assess whether action is required at EU
level or specifically within the Baltic Sea region, depending on how
negotiations on several key issues progress. Due to the topic’s
complexity, dialogue with relevant non-EU actors is considered a
priority and it is recognised that ‘clean shipping’ also entails the
enforcement of environmental regulations concerning the sea, including
environmental surveillance and emission control systems.
The actions of the priority area on clean shipping are to be pursued
through policy dialogue within the priority area and/or in relevant
fora and through concrete activities taken by the flagship projects.
These actions are in line with a number of international and EU
policies, including, but not limited to:
*
the work of the International Maritime Organization (IMO)
regarding air emissions from ships and clean shipping, and in
particular the International Convention for the Prevention of
Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) and its annexes;
*
the relevant EU environmental legislation;
*
the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan adopted in 2007;
*
the Integrated Maritime Policy of the EU. Under this policy,
turning the Baltic Sea into a model region for ‘clean shipping’ is
an umbrella for a range of measures aimed at reducing the
environmental impact of shipping, including innovations in the
shipbuilding industry and manufacturing of marine equipment,
supply of shore side electricity in ports;
*
the work of the priority area serves to reinforce and supplement
these policies at the regional level, while avoiding duplication
of efforts. Due to its global nature, international rules and
standards are usually preferable for shipping industry. While
respecting this principle, certain challenges may apply to Baltic
Sea region only or can be addressed better or faster at a regional
level, from which new forms of cooperation and solutions could be
conveyed to the global level.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Reduce ship pollution and develop shore-side facilities
This action aims to reduce ship pollution, entailing measures on board
vessels as well as the required infrastructure on land. International
cooperation in such fora as the International Maritime Organization
(IMO), the EU and HELCOM has led to the introduction of new rules,
which help to protect the sea and further the transition towards clean
shipping. The ‘Baltic Sea Action Plan’ (BSAP) adopted by HELCOM on 15
November 200754 contains a specific section on maritime activities
such as technologies to reduce pollutions in harbours. At the
international level in 2008, the MARPOL (Annex VI) introduced stricter
conditions for emissions of sulphur dioxide (SOx) in the Baltic Sea
(the sulphur content of any fuel oil used on board ships within the
Baltic Sea – which is a SOx Emission Control Area – from 1 July 2010
emissions of SOx shall not exceed 1.00% m/m and from 1 January 2015
the limit will be 0.10% m/m). Hence, SOx emission will be reduced
substantially by 2015.
As regards nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, the MARPOL (Annex VI)
provides for the establishment of marine areas as NOx emission control
areas (NECA). New rules would require that vessels built in and after
2016 reduce emissions by around 80%. The Baltic Sea countries have
already committed themselves in HELCOM to propose to the IMO the
designation of the Baltic Sea as a NECA and technical documentation on
the Baltic NECA has been finalized. Yet, the final decision on when to
submit a proposal to the IMO is still awaited, cf. with the below
description of the flagship project entitled Introduce Differentiated
Port Dues depending on the Environment Impact on Ships.
Using the fragile condition of the Baltic Sea and the new regulation
as a starting point, the action aims to contribute to the transition
towards clean shipping by facilitating cooperation, developing new
methodologies and technologies and by demonstrating and testing in
practise new solutions that reduces shipping pollution in the Baltic
Sea region and beyond.
There is a greater scope for reducing pollution from ships. Action to
do so could encompass a broad range of initiatives including the type
of fuel used for propulsion and auxiliary engines, technical
installations onboard to clean exhausts, routines and behaviour on
board to reduce fuel consumption, action concerning antifouling and
ballast water and hull construction. The establishment of upgraded
reception facilities for sewage in passenger ports of the Baltic Sea
region is a major challenge, and hence an important objective in the
EUSBSR.
The land-based aspects of clean shipping are equally important. When a
vessel is at port, it should be possible to switch off the engines and
instead receive electricity for its port operations from a clean,
land-based source of power. Similarly, ships’ waste is off-loaded in
ports, therefore the ability to receive and treat the different types
of waste in a responsible manner is key. Building upgraded reception
facilities for sewage in Baltic Sea region passenger ports is a major
challenge and hence an important objective for the EUSBSR. A lack of
availability of low-sulphur bunker oil or other types of less
polluting fuel, such as liquefied natural gas (LNG) in ports should
not be a hindrance to cleaner shipping.
The possibility of regulating port dues depending on the environmental
impact of ships and emissions from ships should be addressed,
preferably in cooperation with the private sector in order to secure
viable business models.
Incentives to opt for the cleanest transport option available are also
of importance. There are several ways to offer such incentives
including indexing providers of transport according to their
environmental impact. Optimising information from land to the vessel
regarding its intended route and speed to reach its destination just
in time is another example of a land-based activity that could help
reduce fuel consumption.
Flagship projects
Promote measures to reduce emissions from ships and enhance the
development of shore-side electricity facilities or for emission
treatment in all major ports around the Baltic Sea. Their use should
be promoted, including through economic incentives, in order to
achieve a level playing field. This flagship project consists of two
major activities:
*
Clean Baltic Sea Shipping – CLEANSHIP. The Cleanship project aims
to identify solutions to reduce ship emissions in order to achieve
a sustainable shipping industry and land transportation links as
required by the new IMO regulations. To this end, the project
seeks to facilitate the implementation of the HELCOM Baltic Sea
Action Plan and is planning to develop a general clean shipping
strategy through six pilot projects. A key element in the project
is the coordinated implementation of the Baltic Sea Action Plan
and joint efforts to develop environmentally friendly
infrastructure, such as shore-side electricity, LNG capabilities
and waste-water reception facilities in ports. The project will be
implemented in cooperation with the private sector on a voluntary
basis. Lead: Port of Trelleborg. Deadline: 31 December 2013.
*
Baltic Sea cooperation for reducing ship and port emissions
through knowledge & innovation-based competitiveness – INNOSHIP.
The Innoship project promotes an innovative transnational approach
to mitigating the different needs and interests of the maritime
sector and ensuring a level playing field for more sustainable and
economically viable management of Baltic Sea resources. The
project will provide the needed knowledge and best practices to
policy and decision makers in the development and joint
implementation of national and transnational policies, strategies
and concrete measures to implement the international low emission
requirements. Practical models and tools will be designed to
estimate the economic implications of the required emission
reductions targets and to encourage voluntary measures and
economic incentives for low emission solutions at local, national
and the Baltic Sea level.55 Lead: Baltic Institute of Finland.
Deadline: 31 December 2013.
*
Promote measures to collect ship-generated waste (enhanced
application of HELCOM’s ‘no special-fee’ system for port reception
facilities especially for oily wastes from machinery spaces,
sewage and rubbish). It is important that the main ports implement
a uniform and transparent approach. Furthermore, the availability
of port reception facilities in the Baltic Sea ports should be
further enhanced covering the delivery of all wastes, including
sewage. The HELCOM member states have agreed to a Roadmap for the
upgrading of port reception facilities for sewage in passenger
ports in the Baltic Sea area. This Roadmap should be implemented
as soon as possible, preferably by 2013, and at the latest by
2015.56 The project has been developed in close correlation with
the now completed flagship project entitled ‘Eliminate the
discharge of sewage from ships’, see annex. Lead: HELCOM.
Deadline: 2015.
*
Introduce Differentiated Port Dues depending on the Environmental
Impact on Ships (enhanced application of HELCOM’s ‘no
special-fee’). The HELCOM ‘Baltic Sea Action Plan’ (BSAP) contains
a specific section on maritime activities promoting for example
technologies to reduce air pollution by ships. At the HELCOM
Ministerial Meeting in Moscow in May 2010 it was decided to work
towards submitting a joint proposal by the Baltic Sea countries to
IMO in order to apply for a NOx Emission Control Area status for
the Baltic Sea, taking into account the results of the study by
HELCOM on economic the impacts of a Baltic Sea NECA and to welcome
and support the idea of NECAs in other sea areas, in particular
the North Sea. Two submissions by the Baltic Sea countries to the
IMO are planned: the NECA submission and the technology overview
submission. Both submissions are ready and the final submission of
the documents is planned for the IMOs Marine Environment
Protection Committee meeting no. 65 (scheduled for July 2013).
Lead: HELCOM. Deadline: 2013.
*
Build competences on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) installations in
the region (MarTech LNG – Marine Competence, Technology and
Knowledge Transfer for LNG in the South Baltic Sea region). The
project aims to ensure that knowledge of LNG technology is
transferred to the countries in the region that are currently
building LNG terminals. It is important to ensure capacity
building and to transfer knowledge on the topic to companies in
the region, in order to ensure that future operation and
maintenance can be done locally. The project addresses the
potential supply chain of small-and medium-sized enterprises in
the region that have an opportunity to gain competence in LNG
technology during the construction of LNG terminals, as well as
scientific institutions. The anticipated result is a regional
cluster with competence on LNG that can utilize business
opportunities offered in the emerging LNG market. Lead: Klaipeda
Science and Technology Park, Lithuania. Deadline: December 2014.
*
Indexing the environmental impact of vessels (Clean Shipping Index
– real time, quantified insight into the environmental performance
of ships). Cargo owners increasingly influence the logistic chains
for their goods. The drivers are efficiency and costs, but also
reliability and sustainability. In the Clean Shipping Index
database ships and ship owners are ranked in accordance with their
environmental performance. In order to minimize their corporate
environmental footprints, cargo owners may use the information
from the Clean Shipping Index during the procurement of sea
transport. The project has already close to 50 shipping companies
involved and nearly 2000 vessels are indexed. The intention is to
expand the cargo owner network and attract more shipping companies
and simultaneously extend the concept to other parts of Europe
with a view to becoming a self-sustaining organisation in 3-5
years. Lead: Clean Shipping Network Association. Deadline: 2015.
The above projects address a broad range of issues pertaining to clean
shipping, but not all topics are covered yet. The coordinator of
priority area welcomes proposals for new flagship projects in
particular regarding the use of renewable or less polluting types of
fuel for propulsion; statistics on and definition of sewage and
ship-generated wastes and the associated infrastructure in ports;
ballast water and other issues that have not yet been addressed.
PA SME – Promote entrepreneurship and strengthen the growth of SMEs
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Denmark
In the BSR the conditions for growth need to be strengthened. There
should be greater and more effective support for entrepreneurship and
SMEs development, as well as stronger cooperation between enterprises,
knowledge institutions and public authorities at national and regional
levels in the region. Such initiatives are important in terms of
achieving the political objectives of the EUSBSR, in particular
Objective 3 – increase prosperity of the BSR, and especially the
sub-objectives ‘EUSBSR contributing to the implementation of Europe
2020 Strategy’, ‘Improved global competitiveness of the Baltic Sea
Region’ and ‘Climate Change Adaption’.
Actions and flagship projects under priority area ‘SME’ shall target
entrepreneurs and SMEs and the specific challenges that they face with
regard to cross-border collaboration, access to markets and access to
finance, human resources and knowledge. Specific activities may
include analytical work, the establishment of macro-regional
public-private partnerships, joint initiatives in the field of
business, trade and investment promotion, and the establishment and
marketing of joint test and demonstration facilities.
Actions and flagships projects under priority area ‘SME’ shall be
focused on grand societal challenges such as climate change,
sustainable growth, resource efficiency, and on specific business
sectors that hold a significant potential for growth in the BSR, in
particular eco-industries, biotechnology, medical equipment, creative
industries, the food manufacturing industry and the maritime
industries, as well as sustainable and innovative use of marine
resources by business and entrepreneurs.
All activities under priority area ‘SME’ will be closely coordinated
with activities under other priority areas in the above-mentioned
sub-objectives, and especially priority area ‘Innovation’. Activities
under priority area ‘SME’ will also explore synergies with activities
at EU level, such as the Small Business Act, the European innovation
partnerships, and the Blue Growth Agenda, and will make use of funding
opportunities provided by Cohesion funds and EU programmes such as
LIFE, FP7 and CIP (Horizon 2020 and COSME after 2013) where
appropriate.
Added value is provided by actions that help address the problems that
stakeholders in the BSR face, in particular with regard to
establishing new contacts and strategic partnerships with other
players in the BSR.
An example of how the EUSBSR has provided added value to stakeholders
is the financial support for the establishment of a Baltic Sea Region
Network for offshore renewable energy.
Lindoe Offshore Renewables Centre (LORC), a leading centre for
knowledge, innovation, testing, and demonstration of green offshore
technology, has received EU technical assistance under the EUSBSR to
lead the establishment a macro-regional network of enterprises and
knowledge institutions in the BSR that are interested in jointly
exploring new paths to growth and innovation in the green offshore
industry. The network will as a point of departure explore the
potential of high powered laser welding methods and launch joint
actions. High powered laser welding methods hold the potential for
reducing production time and costs of large scale structures, and
joint initiatives in this field can contribute to increasing
productivity and thus the global competitiveness of the green offshore
industry as well as other industries in the BSR.
The network will help bring together all leading players in the BSR
within the green offshore industry and make full use of their
complementary competences with the aim of transforming the BSR into a
global hotspot for the green offshore industry. It will also provide a
basis for joint applications for EU funding for research and
development, thus contributing to innovation and growth in the longer
term.
This example shows the economic potential of involving leading players
and stakeholders in the BSR in the development and implementation of
joint projects. A high level involvement will help create a visible
and long-lasting impact on socio-economic developments in the BSR.
Main problems identified by the priority area coordinators of priority
area ‘SME’ are:
*
Collaboration between players in the BSR. There is a need to
facilitate collaboration between key players in the BSR within
business areas with a high potential for growth and innovation.
*
Entrepreneurship and innovation in the BSR needs to be supported,
in particular high-growth entrepreneurship and eco-innovation in
all sectors, including for marine and maritime sectors.
*
There is a need for joint initiatives aimed at increasing
awareness at global level of the many opportunities offered by the
BSR.
*
Access to finance continues to be a major challenge for
entrepreneurs and SMEs. This is, however, a cross-cutting issue
and should be addressed as such under the EUSBSR.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. A limited number of
indicators that translate what the main objectives of the priorities
are about will be defined. They will be accompanied with relevant
targets and deadlines, baseline and statistics/information sources.
The following three areas will be used as indicators for this
particular PA:
1) Geographical coverage measured as a target of participants from at
least four different countries in each of the flagship projects
(average).
2) Value added for stakeholders measured in a yearly survey targeting
that at least 75% of the participating entities consider their
participation in the flagship project to provide added value.
3) Timely start-up and completion, measured with a target of
completing at least eight flagship projects by 31 December 2014.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Building platforms for growth
This action will facilitate the establishment of macro-regional
platforms for strategic collaboration within areas that hold a high
potential for growth and innovation. The target group includes
entrepreneurs, SMEs and knowledge institutions in the BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Regional platform for strategic collaboration in the green
offshore industry. The ambition of this project is to establish a
regional platform in the green offshore industry to support and
increase the level of cross-border collaboration between key
players in the BSR. Lead: LORC, Denmark. Deadline: December 2013.
*
Make the Baltic Sea region a leader in design. The ambition of
this project proposal is to establish a regional platform in the
field of design to support and increase the level of cross-border
collaboration between key players in the BSR. Lead: Danish
Business Authority. Deadline for finalisation: December 2013.
*
Baltic Business Arena (BBA) is a project that develops platforms
for SMEs to support cooperation in terms of innovation, trade,
exports with joint delivery across borders etc. It may include
other activities aimed at simplifying rules and procedures and
reducing barriers within the internal market. Among BBA activities
is a matchmaking forum for SMEs in the Baltic Sea region,
facilitating direct meetings, discussions and knowledge exchange
between SMEs entering the export market, investigating possible
partners under outsourcing plans or looking for partners to
increase access to R&D expertise. The Swedish Agency for Economic
& Regional Growth has initiated BBA and will be a future
cooperation partner together with the Swedish Institute. Lead: Baltic
Development Forum. Deadline: to be determined.
Action: Effective support for entrepreneurship and innovation
The ambition of this action is to provide evidence and new impetus to
designing effective support measures for entrepreneurship and
innovation in the BSR, including the establishment and development of
strong eco-systems for entrepreneurs and of joint test and
demonstration facilities. The target group includes policy makers,
entrepreneurs, SMEs and cluster managers in the BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Entrepreneurship training as part of the school curriculum. The
ambition of this project is to formulate a strategy for closer
collaboration in the BSR to promote entrepreneurship education. It
will promote the exchange of good practices between interested
countries or regions, taking into consideration existing EU
initiatives in this field, in particular those related to the
Small Business Act. Lead: National Education Agency, Denmark.
Deadline: December 2013.
Action: Going green
This action will support eco-innovation and resource efficiency in the
BSR, in particular collaborative projects involving SMEs and knowledge
institutions in the BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Develop deeper cooperation on environmental technology to create
new business opportunities. To strengthen SMEs in the
environmental technology sector more critical mass in knowledge
and technology needs to be created, involving both RTD (research)
and enterprises. Joint actions should include increased
cooperation in export promotion. Lead: Poland. Deadline for
progress review: to be determined.
*
Implement the project ‘Sustainable Production through Innovation
in Small and Medium sized Enterprise’. The aim is to increase the
innovation potential in SMEs to enhance their sustainable
production processes, thereby increasing company profits whilst
reducing economic and environmental costs. (Project financed by
the Baltic Sea Region Programme under the ‘Territorial
Cooperation’ objective of the ERDF; total budget € 3 million over
3 ½ years). Lead: Germany. Deadline for progress review: December
2013.
*
Make the Baltic Sea an eco-efficient region e.g. by establishing a
network on green public procurement for the exchange of good
practice and experience. Focal points should be established in all
BSR Member States to increase knowledge and disseminate
information. Lead: Germany and Sweden. Deadline for progress
review: December 2013.
Action: Global opportunities
This action will promote more internationalisation of SMEs in the BSR
and cross-border cooperation between business organisations, local,
regional, national authorities and trade and investment promotion
bodies in the BSR.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Supply. The project sets up supporting structures for SMEs
in order to facilitate access to inter-regional supply markets in
north-eastern Europe. It establishes a service network of Regional
Development Agencies, Business Development Organisations,
government agencies and knowledge institutions that will help
small and medium-sized businesses to identify new business
opportunities and to join forces across regional boundaries for
sustained success on interregional supply markets. For this
purpose the project has established the ‘European Business Support
Network’ (www.eubizz.net) as a virtual and personalised service
infrastructure offering innovation, market development and
training services by network partners. Market focus is on the
three industries: maritime industry, food, energy. Lead: Germany.
Deadline for progress review: December 2013.
*
Internationalisation of SMEs through value chains. The project
will collect and analyse data on the impact of policy measures and
projects that have promoted the internationalisation of SMEs
through integration in macro-regional and global value chains. It
will take into consideration the existing initiatives in this
field at local and national level, EU level and relevant
activities of the OECD, as well as propose and implement joint
initiatives in the BSR. Lead: Danish Business Authority, Denmark.
Deadline: December 2013.
PA Tourism – Reinforcing cohesiveness of the macro-region through
tourism
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (Germany)
Tourism plays an important role in the European economy, with some 1.8
million enterprises employing approximately 9.7 million people. It
accounts for five per cent of both employment and gross domestic
product in the EU. Maritime and coastal tourism play a significant
role. As tourism also affects the demand for services and products in
other sectors, its indirect relevance for the macro-regional
development is much higher.
Growth in the tourism sector has been supporting the economic recovery
in the Baltic Sea region. In 2011, the number of international trips
in Europe grew by 4%. The top growth rates were achieved in the three
Baltic States with an increase in Latvia of 31%, Lithuania of 25%, and
Estonia of 15%. Arrivals from China, India and Russia grew at a
double-digit rate.
In rural areas, tourism is often a key sector in generating growth and
employment, next to agriculture. It offers an economic incentive to
stay in the countryside, and gives people pride in their traditions,
in their cultural and natural heritage. It stimulates investment in
infrastructure and transport facilities, and thus helps achieve
balanced territorial development in the region.
Apart from these factors, the development of a globally competitive
tourism scene in the Baltic Sea region also depends on close
cooperation with other sectors, e.g. information and communication
technology, and the environment and health. Tourism trends are aligned
with societal, technological and global trends, like demographic
change, climate change and environmental challenges or the economic
rise of the formerly called ‘emerging countries’. So tourism is
subject to constant change and development. Today, it has to
increasingly meet the requirements of elderly and disabled people as
well as lone travellers. It needs to be developed and consumed
sustainably, and it has ideally to be climate-friendly.
Smart environments have to provide timely and on-site information to
the traveller. Online platforms and social media are becoming
increasingly essential. In addition, there is growing demand for
theme-based high-quality products in the fields of culture, nature,
sports and ‘edutainment’. So tourism sector has by its very nature to
be sustainable, innovative and entrepreneurial.
Tourism cooperation in the region should also involve non-EU countries
like Norway, and especially the parts of the Russian Federation that
border the Baltic Sea. To this end, existing and developing formats
like the Baltic Sea Tourism Fora, the ‘Turku Process’ and the
‘Modernization Partnership for the South Eastern Baltic Area’ (SEBA),
under the umbrella of the Council of the Baltic Sea States, should be
used where appropriate.
Creating and promoting sustainable and innovative tourism products and
services at cross-border and transnational level around specific
themes not only help to profile the region as a tourism destination in
key source markets – by highlighting the common cultural and natural
heritage and history, tourism cooperation could link economic benefit
with the perception of the region as a shared reference point in the
identity of the inhabitants of the macro-region.
Tourism in the Baltic Sea region is still fragmented and
non-cooperative. There are various reasons for this. First, there are
different levels of development and cooperation in the tourism sector,
leading to an asymmetric readiness to cooperate at transnational
level. Major reasons for this are the availability of resources and
know-how, the design of funding instruments, long-standing cooperation
patterns, especially in Scandinavia, and the accessibility of the
macro-region.
Within the European Territorial Cooperation objective, tourism
cooperation in projects mostly takes place at cross-border level and
thus has limited geographic reach. Attempts to better link
tourism-related projects at transnational level need further
incentives, also through appropriate access to funding. The business
perspective of the projects receiving funding should also be
strengthened, e.g. by involving private-sector partners in the
cooperation, which could increase the durability of the project
results. Links to educational institutions to enhance skills and to
develop quality tourism in terms of services are also essential.
Targets and indicators
Currently, tourism in the region lacks a comprehensive institutional
and political framework. The existing tourism cooperation structures,
like working groups or projects, are concerned with specific interests
and topics, are of a temporary or intermittent character, or lack the
desired geographic coverage of the macro-region.
Tourism policy and tourism-related activities are developed and run
largely without joint objectives, approaches and standards on a
macro-regional level. Accordingly, no common targets and indicators
for the tourism sector are available for priority area ‘Tourism’ to
rely on.
The targets should be based on the overall objectives of the priority
area.
1.
For the cooperative dimension the target should be real
opportunities for networking among all Baltic Sea states on
tourism issues provided and used as a major result of, among other
factors, the work of priority area ‘Tourism’. In the long run,
establishing an institutionalised cooperation framework for
tourism might be desirable but seems unrealistic for the moment.
2.
For the policy dimension the target should focus on an increase in
the number of jointly developed tourism strategy and policy
documents available, both regarding comprehensive/all-inclusive
strategies, and documents focusing on more specific aspects of
tourism, including maritime and coastal tourism.
Indicators:
1.
Cooperative dimension: number of fora (conferences, meetings,
workshops etc.) for dialogue on tourism cooperation with
participation of stakeholders representing the Baltic Sea states.
2.
Policy dimension: number of jointly developed strategy or policy
documents on tourism in the Baltic Sea region.
Year of reference: 2009
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinator. Targets and deadline,
baseline, and statistics/information sources related to the above
indicators will be defined.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Facilitate networking and clustering of tourism stakeholders
This networking action should include private business,
non-governmental organisations, public authorities, and multilateral
cooperation structures in the entire Baltic Sea region. To this
effect, all existing tourism-related network initiatives should be
utilised including the annual Baltic Sea Tourism Forum (BSTF).
The implementation of this action requires a long-term approach and is
primarily pursued at the level of the coordinator of priority area
‘Tourism’. Close cooperation has been built up with multilateral
cooperation structures with relevance for tourism cooperation in the
region, including tourism stakeholders that promote the BSTF. As a
result of this cooperation it has been agreed that the BSTF in
November 2012 and in 2013 will be organised in cooperation with
priority area ‘Tourism’. This cooperation is done with a view to
institutionalise the BSTF and to establish it as a permanent forum for
tourism cooperation in the Baltic Sea region in the future. This does
not only require the acceptance of the forum by key tourism
stakeholders but also an appropriate level of financial resources. The
financing of a respective transnational project in the EU programme
period 2014–2020 could mark an important step in developing an
institutionalised cooperation structure.
In the meantime, cooperation with key stakeholders shall be further
extended and intensified. Funding instruments like seed money
facilities shall be used where available and appropriate in order to
further elaborate the concept and profile of a joint cooperation forum
for tourism. Out of these activities, a corresponding project pipeline
could be possibly built up and become flagship project under priority
area ‘Tourism’, if appropriate.
Potential flagship projects
*
Network of regional tourism innovation centres for Baltic Sea
Region. Identification of expertise and know-how in different
areas of the region by conducting a study on the covered research
areas and research caps, available expertise, including Russia
(especially St. Petersburg area) and Norway, understanding about
different innovation systems and structures as well on the
existing networks between tourism and other business branches
(e.g. energy, health, living and building sector, cleantech and
environmental technologies, maritime industry). Based on the
findings, create cooperation/networks between regional innovation
clusters, benefiting from each other’s expertise, transferring
knowledge, finding best partners for development actions and
sharing best practices to support the renewal, growth and
competitiveness of the BSR tourism industry. Lead: Regional
Council for Southwest Finland and Turku Touring/Centre of
Expertise for Tourism and Experience Management. Preparation and
planning phase during 2013, operational phase 2014.
Action: Mobilise the full potential for sustainable tourism of the
Baltic Sea region
By developing common strategies and approaches based on environmental
and social responsibility, and building on the commitment of various
stakeholders, including Russia, cooperation could include:
facilitating the exchange of best practices, harmonisation of
standards, regional marketing and branding activities, the development
of joint tourism products and projects in the region.
Flagship projects
*
Facilitate sustainable land excursions of cruise ship operators in
the Baltic Sea by developing pilot actions in order to elaborate
guidelines for the application of sustainability criteria for the
product format ‘land excursions’. After the implementation and the
evaluation of the pilot actions, it is intended to offer a
standardised process for this product in order to promote the
dissemination of the results within the cruise ship sector. Lead:
AIDA Cruises, Germany. Deadline for progress review: July 2013.
*
Promote the cultural and natural heritage by monitoring on-going
initiatives and trends in tourism development in the Baltic Sea
region. Cooperation on the part of public and private sector
partners will focus on tourist product development and it’s
launching into the market. The flagship project will be part of
the Enjoy South Baltic! project for the South Baltic region. It
shall be expanded to the whole Baltic Sea region by disseminating
the project results and by clustering with relevant networks and
projects. Lead: Office of the Marshal of the Pomorskie
Voivodeship; Pomorskie Tourist Board, Poland. Deadline for
progress review: June 2014.
*
Develop strategies for sustainable tourism by using available
sources of information such as the YEPAT database57 or the Nordic
Culture Point. In addition, within the project AGORA 2.0,58
partners from the Baltic Sea region (including Belarus) will start
on pilot projects to improve the accessibility to the natural,
cultural and historical heritage for tourism and to detect
elements of a common identity for the region. Lead: University of
Greifswald, Germany. Deadline for finalisation: July 2013.
Potential flagship projects
*
Attract tourists to rural areas especially the coastal ones by
promoting joint sustainable rural and coastal tourism packages
(e.g. farm, food tourism, hiking, winter sports, nature based
tourism) and by creating a network of players in the tourism
sector, research and education, local and public sector in order
to share and disseminate best practices and know-how on products,
services and accessibility.
PA Transport – Improving internal and external transport links
--------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Lithuania and Sweden
In the Baltic Sea region, transport is particularly important as the
distances – internally, to the rest of Europe and to the wider world –
are very long and the conditions for traffic are often difficult
(forests, lakes, snow and ice in the winter, etc.). Raw materials and
manufactured goods deriving from the rich natural resources in the
northernmost parts of the region are attractive on the world market.
This region, which is partly located on the periphery of the economic
centre of Europe, depends strongly on foreign trade in goods and on an
international exchange of knowledge and services. Thus a
well-functioning transport system, combined with greater attention to
the spatial development and location patterns, is of vital importance
for its prosperity and economic growth.
80 million people within a large territory, world-renowned industries
in a rich variety of branches, a competitive economic and scientific
capacity, but comparably small urban regions, also call for improved
accessibility within the region aiming at strengthening the joint
Baltic market potential.
Moreover, the Baltic Sea is a sensitive ecosystem, which makes
environmental considerations important in the development of transport
infrastructures. The designation of the Baltic Sea as a Particularly
Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) by the International Maritime Organization
(IMO) allows for the development of specific measures for the Baltic
Sea to ensure the sustainability of maritime transport.
The geography of the Baltic Sea region makes transport particularly
challenging. The improvement of internal and external transport links,
increasing the efficiency and minimising the environmental impact of
transport systems, should contribute to higher competitiveness of the
Baltic Sea region, and increase its accessibility and attractiveness.
One of the main elements of the EUSBSR is the potential to generate
added value for the region through the coordination of activities
aimed at facilitating border crossing. Of particular interest are
activities concerning border crossing infrastructure and procedures on
the border between the EU and its neighbouring countries. The region
benefits from transiting freight flows and from higher mobility among
EU and non-EU citizens. Regional initiatives that aim to remove
bottlenecks should receive adequate attention and support.
The further development of a sustainable transport system in the
macro-region is one of the key objectives of the strategy. Actions in
the transport area have an important impact on the environment and the
economy, thus contributing to other goals of the strategy as well.
The recent drive for innovation and environmentally-friendly transport
solutions has become evident through green corridors initiatives,
which bring together various stakeholders and actions in order to
provide greener international logistics services.
One of the main challenges for the Baltic Sea region’s transport
system is to improve the joint planning process in the region, giving
national strategic planners more opportunities to meet and learn from
each other. In this process, it is crucial to have a common view of
the future challenges for the transport system and to have planning
tools that all countries can trust.
The tools in place today are insufficient and there is a lack of
knowledge exchange between national strategic planners. This was the
main conclusion from the EU-financed project Baltic Transport Outlook
2030 (BTO 2030), which was commissioned by the transport ministries of
all EU member states in the Baltic Sea region.
Several valuable studies and processes have been launched, amongst
others, at transnational level including neighbouring countries, with
Northern Dimension Partnership on Transport and Logistics (NDPTL), at
national level with BTO 2030 above-mentioned, and at regional level
with initiatives like the cluster of transport projects on
sustainable, multimodal and green transport corridors (Transbaltic,
Scandria or East West Transport Corridor). One of the objectives of
this priority area will be to improve the exchange and the
coordination of information and knowledge drawn from these different
processes in order to help strategic planners make more efficient
recommendations as regards infrastructure and transport systems in the
Baltic Sea region, both internally and externally to the region.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the priority area coordinators. When they are still
missing, targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information
sources related to the above indicators will be defined.
Objective
Proposed indicator Name and Description
Baseline Value (2011)
Target Values (2020)
Information Sources for Baseline and Target
Increased cooperation in joint planning and implementation of
infrastructure.
Implementation of international transport infrastructure projects in
line with the TEN-T network.
TBC.
Multilateral agreements on development of projects ‘Rail Baltica’ and
‘Via Baltica’ between EE, LV, LT, PL, FI, and other projects;
Preparatory works finished if needed (studies, etc.);
Start of modernization or construction and progress, km.
Transport ministries, TEN-T Agency, relevant agreements and studies.
Reduction of average travel time on the TEN-T network.
TBC.
Travel time of passengers and freight reduced by 20% in 2020
Increase of design speed by 20% in 2020.
Transport ministries, railway companies, Eurostat.
Improve external links of the region.
Number of projects implemented within the NDPTL framework.
TBC.
3 to 4 (to be decided).
NDPTL secretariat, Transport Ministries.
Improvement of traffic flow on the external links of the region.
TBC.
Waiting time reduction at the international border crossing points at
EU border with neighbouring countries;
Reduction of days with queues per year at the international border
crossing points at EU border with neighbouring countries;
Increase of share of vehicles using the electronic queue management
system at EU border crossing points with the third countries.
Transport ministries,
Transport
Associations,
Eurostat, custom administrations.
Smarter transport solutions.
Development of balanced network of green transport corridors.59
TBC.
A number of green corridors North-South and East-West direction.
Transport ministries,
TEN-T Agency.
TBC.
Advanced technology and sustainable logistics solutions.
Green corridor Manual, performance indicator of each green corridor.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Cooperate on national transport policies and infrastructure
investments
Macro-regional cooperation should increase on transport issues for
example on the interoperability of transport systems, icebreaking,
co-modality, transport research and development, the application of
new solutions in particular in traffic management systems (air, road,
rail, maritime), the promotion of joint actions (e.g. on road safety)
and the sharing of best practices.
The stakeholders should jointly develop transport infrastructure
networks as defined by the TEN-T policy (TEN-T Guidelines regulation).
Links to remote islands, EU neighbouring countries and the periphery
(including air connections) should be considered.
In particular, both the TEN-T core and comprehensive network should be
implemented on time, with due priority given to the TEN-T core network
corridors.
The inland waterway and estuary navigation should be promoted
addressing existing infrastructural bottlenecks in order to ensure
optimal connections between the various regions of the Baltic Sea,
such as the Oder Waterway (project E30).
Flagship projects
*
Timely completion of major infrastructure projects in the
macro-region, including:
*
Upgrading of road, rail and maritime infrastructure in Sweden and
Finland across borders on the Nordic Triangle multimodal corridor;
*
Rail Baltica linking Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia (as
well as Finland through a rail-ferry service);
*
Fehmarnbelt Fixed Link between Denmark and Germany with the
improved access to railways from Copenhagen and Hannover/Bremen
via Hamburg (a part of Green STRING Corridor);
*
Railway axis Gdańsk-Warsaw-Brno/Bratislava-Vienna (Rail freight
Corridor No 5);
*
Motorway axis Gdańsk-Brno/Bratislava-Vienna;
*
Railway axis
Stockholm-Malmö-Copenhagen-Hamburg-Innsbruck-Verona-Palermo (Rail
freight corridor No 3).
And other important projects for the macro-region, such as:
*
Railway axis Bremerhaven/Rotterdam-Terespol (Poland-Belarus
border)-Kaunas (Rail Freight Corridor No. 8);
*
Via Baltica linking Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia;
*
TEN-T core network East-West connections through the Baltic States
and in the north of the region;
*
The Bothnian Corridor (divided between the Swedish side and the
Finnish side), which connects the Northern Axis to the Nordic
Triangle and to Rail Baltica;
*
Northern Axis;
*
Links with the Barents region;
*
Multimodal (North-South Transport Axes: from
Scandinavia-Germany/Poland to the Adriatic Sea).
Lead: respective Member State. Deadline for progress review: 2015.
Action: Improve the connections with Russia and other EU neighbouring
countries
The Northern Dimension policy (Northern Dimension Partnership on
Transport and Logistics) is a suitable platform for cooperation
regarding development of major transport connections and freight
transport logistics. Special attention should be given to removing non
infrastructure-related bottlenecks, such as those associated with
border crossings. Member States should also explore options for new
connections to the East and Far East (the gateway to Asia).
Flagship projects
*
Make full use of cooperation with the Northern Dimension
Partnership on Transport and Logistics. The purpose of this
partnership is to identify appropriate priorities in terms of
infrastructure, interoperability and border crossing facilitation
that could strengthen the transport system, primarily in the
Baltic Sea area, thus identifying possible sources of financing
(national funds, EU funds, international financial institutions)
that could support the implementation of such projects. Lead:
NDPTL secretariat. Deadline for progress review: 2014.
Action: Facilitate efficient and sustainable Baltic passenger and
freight transport solutions
Freight transport solutions can be supported through a number of
initiatives, e.g. by removing non infrastructure-related bottlenecks,
promoting inter-modal connections, developing the Green Corridor
concept by implementing specific projects, developing infrastructure,
supporting logistics service providers, establishing coordinated
electronic administrative procedures or harmonising control
procedures.
Timely implementation of the rail freight corridors foreseen in the
Regulation for a European rail network for competitive freight (EC
Regulation 913/2010) will better connect freight nodes in the Baltic
Sea region with the broader rail freight network. The creation of this
network will help improve operations and will facilitate close
cooperation between rail infrastructure managers on traffic management
issues and on investments, and particularly will position a governance
structure for each corridor. It foresees sufficient and reliable
capacities allocated to freight on these corridors, the coordination
between rail infrastructure management and goods terminal management,
the definition of objectives of performance as punctuality and
capacity and their monitoring, the coordination of works and easier
access to and exchange of relevant information. This will contribute
to attractive and efficient rail freight services within the region
and with other European regions which is essential for modal shift.
Flagship projects
*
Development of green corridors network implies an effective
implementation of EU regulations, restrictions and incentives. The
main aim is to make transport system efficient and effective thus
reducing the external effects, emissions, noise, accidents and
congestion (several green corridor projects and initiatives are
currently running: COINCO North II, GreCor, the cluster of
transport projects on sustainable, multimodal and green transport
corridors). Lead: East-West Transport corridor Association.
Deadline: 2015.
*
Easy Way programme (use of intelligent transport systems for more
efficient transport operations, e.g. deployment of ITS Services on
TEN-T network in the Baltic Sea region in order to facilitate
passenger and freight transport). Lead: Baltic Easy Way Partners
Steering Group. Deadline: to be determined.
Action: Increase the role of the Baltic Sea in the transport systems
of the region
Through, inter alia, identifying and implementing the Motorways of the
Sea60 and Marco Polo actions; developing ports and their adequate
connections to the hinterland, in particular by rail and inland
waterways; increasing the competitiveness and efficiency of sea
shipping through the prompt introduction of EU Maritime Transport
Space without barriers and through the gradual introduction of
e-freight and e-maritime concepts; supporting safe, energy efficient
and sustainable short sea shipping and port operations.
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Motorways of the Seas network links the Baltic Sea Member
States with Member States in Central and Western Europe through
sustainable transport links, including the route through the North
Sea/Kiel Canal/Danish straits. Essential elements in the Motorways
of the Sea projects are, inter alia, improved road and rail
infrastructure that links the port with the hinterland, improved
infrastructure within a port, ITS solutions, environmental
measures and activities related to winter navigation. Several
Motorways of the Sea projects are currently running (in particular
Karlshamm – Klaipeda link, as well as the Karlskrona-Gdynia
links). Lead: The Baltic Motorways of the Sea Task Force. Deadline
for progress review: 2015.
Horizontal Actions
==================
HA Involve – Strengthening multi-level governance including involving
civil society, business and academia
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Region Västerbotten and Kalmar and the Baltic Sea NGO
Network
The main aim of this horizontal action (HA) is to deepen dialogue
between actors at all levels of governance in the Baltic Sea region on
how to jointly tackle future problems and challenges. This dialogue
must ensure the involvement of relevant actors, such as the European
Commission, national ministries and authorities, local and regional
authorities, macro-regional organisations, civil society, business and
academia. Methods will be developed on how to achieve this. It is
vital to involve all the relevant actors in a constructive way and in
accordance with their different competences in order to ensure
sustainable development in the Baltic Sea region and successful
implementation of the EUSBSR. This is particularly relevant as a
substantial number of the planned EUSBSR Action Plan measures rely
heavily on local and regional levels and have an impact on a large
number of sectors.
Social capital and social trust lay an important foundation for a
sustainable and inclusive society. They also create a good environment
for a creative, innovative and mobile society. Therefore, the
involvement of civil society, business and academia in the
implementation of the Strategy is of utmost importance. Experience
from Nordic cooperation, which is built on a close network of
cross-border relations in all parts of society, clearly shows the
importance of a strong civil society and the relevance of cooperation
between civil society and the public sector.
For this purpose, this horizontal action will develop methods for the
early-stage involvement of all relevant actors; regional and local
administrations, civil society, business and academia, in the
preparation and implementation of the Strategy. In practice this HA
will function as an advisor to the respective priority areas on how
they can achieve this involvement, making Multi-Level Governance (MLG)
a reality within the Baltic Sea region. With regard to the involvement
of civil society, the Baltic Sea NGO Network, representing more than
500 NGOs all over the Baltic Sea region, including the neighbouring
countries Norway, Iceland and Russia, will function as a resource
centre, providing human capital and competence to the EUSBSR.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the above indicators will be defined.
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
1. Mapping of the current MLG-situation in different priority areas in
the BSR countries.
Data missing.
An analysis of the present situation has been published in the
beginning of 2014.
PACs and national focal points.
2. Development of MLG-tools in the EUSBSR.
Data missing. Will be discussed and investigated in dialogue with PACs
during 2012/2013, and presented in the end of 2013.
MLG-tools have been developed in 2–3 PAs and checklist to secure
MLG-aspects in programmes and projects are published.
The relevant PACs.
3. Involvement in the EUSBSR implementation from the local and
regional levels.
The on-going or finalized flagship projects, 1 June 2012.
The number of flagship projects with lead partner and partners
representing the local and regional levels has increased until 1
January, 2014.
INTERACT homepage and/or the EUSBSR Action Plan with presentation of
all flagship projects will be used as source.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: Definition and knowledge of MLG
Multi-level governance (MLG) is a concept that has not been clearly
defined and is understood in different ways in different countries and
contexts. There is a lack of definition, knowledge and mapping of the
current situation. There is a need for greater knowledge about the
EUSBSR at the local and regional level and about how to influence and
implement the EUSBSR in general and the MLG-aspects in particular.
Flagship projects
*
Mapping of the current MLG-situation in different priority areas
in the BSR countries. In 2013, the horizontal action leaders will
engage in dialogue with the priority areas coordinators and
national focal points to study and analyse the situation with
regard to the responsibilities for duties under different priority
areas in the respective BSR countries. Lead: HALs. Deadline: end
2013.
Action: Develop tools for MLG and the involvement of civil society,
business and academia in PA and HA
MLG is about securing the integration of different administrative
levels in the development and the implementation of the EUSBSR
according to their responsibilities. In this HA there is also a wider
commitment to ensure the involvement of civil society, business and
academia in the development and implementation of the EUSBSR.
Therefore it is recommended to form working groups of stakeholders at
both the national and regional level, including representatives from
local, regional and national authorities, civil society, business and
academia. The groups will be established in the relevant priority
areas.
Flagship projects
*
Ensure the consideration of MLG including the involvement of civil
society, business and academia aspects in each of the priority
areas. By the end of 2013, HALs will have had a dialogue with each
of the PACs to discuss the need for targets and indicators
directed to all administrative levels and the involvement of civil
society, business and academia in their respective priority areas
and flagship projects. Furthermore the HALs, together with 2-3
‘pilot’ PACs, will develop methods for integrating MLG and
involving civil society, business and academia in their respective
PAs as an example also for other PAs. Lead: HALs. Deadline: end
2013.
Action: Communication and information
Ensure that the programme for the EUSBSR Annual Forum involves local
and regional representatives and stimulates all levels to participate
in the Forum. The MLG aspects should be taken into consideration in
all information and communication on the EUSBSR.
Flagship projects
*
Ensure the highlighting of the MLG aspect in the Annual Forum as
well as the involvement of civil society, business and academia.
HALs should be involved in the planning of the EUSBSR Annual Forum
2013 in order to secure the involvement of local and regional
authorities and stimulate all types of relevant actors to
participate in the Forum. The Baltic Sea NGO Network will be
present at the Annual Forum. Lead: HALs. Deadline: end 2013.
Action: Involvement of pan-Baltic organisations
Relevant pan-Baltic organisations, such as the UBC, CPMR, Baltic Sea
Commission, BSSSC, BaltMet, CBSS, Nordic Council of Ministers and B7
should be more integrated in the development and implementation of the
EUSBSR.
Flagship projects
*
By the end of 2013, the HALs will have had a dialogue with the
relevant pan-Baltic Organisations like the UBC, CPMR, Baltic Sea
Commission, BSSSC, BaltMet, CBSS and B7 to discuss how their work
could be more integrated with the development and implementation
of the EUSBSR. Lead: HALs. Deadline: end 2013.
Action: Inclusion of experts from NGOs in the preparation and
implementation of the EUSBSR
The members of the Baltic Sea NGO Network include organisations with
expertise of particular relevance to the following priority areas and
horizontal actions: ‘Nutri’, ‘Bio’, ‘Agri’, ‘Ship’, ‘Transport’,
‘Energy’, ‘Tourism’, ‘Culture’, ‘Health’, ‘Education’, ‘Neighbours’,
‘Sustainable development’.
In 2013, the HALs will upgrade its website to increase transparency
and to give better access to member organisations. The HALs may
recommend NGOs to be invited to participate in steering groups or to
other activities organised within the priority areas, such as seminars
or workshops.
Action: Capacity building in supporting NGOs transnational cooperation
within the BSR
In order to improve NGOs’ capacity to organise and to get financial
support in their respective Member States, the HALs will update its
survey on the prerequisites for NGOs to organise and to get financial
support in respective Member States. This survey will be used for
benchmarking. The HALs will, in cooperation with the CBSS and
academics, carry out a survey of traditions of civil society
involvement in the Baltic Sea countries. This survey will help to
identify examples of best practice. It will also help increase the
involvement of different actors in MLG, and help to align and make
more efficient the various sources of funding of civil society in the
BSR, such as that from the EU, the Nordic Council of Ministers and
national resources.
Action: National NGOs as a resource for involving civil society,
business and academia
National platforms of the Baltic Sea NGO Network will provide service
such as information, education, meetings with and communication to
potential beneficiaries or people interested in the implementation of
the EUSBSR.
In addition to the above mentioned actions and flagship projects, the
Commission would like to encourage to implement the following action
and flagship project.
Action: Integration of Community-Led Local Development (CLLD) to the
EUSBSR
In 2014-2020 programming period the CLLD groups will be formed mostly
on the basis of current Local Action Groups as financed from the rural
development programmes (but open in the future for funding from other
Structural Funds programmes).
Flagship projects
*
Rural Development Networks establishing a platform to discuss
aspects of local development strategies relevant to the EUSBSR and
co-ordinate joint activities of the CLLD Groups. Lead:
Nordic-Baltic Rural Development Network. Deadline: 2016.
HA Neighbours – To increase the co-operation with neighbouring
countries to tackle joint challenges in the Baltic Sea region
--------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: City of Turku (Finland) and the Council of Baltic Sea
States Secretariat
www.turkuprocess.fi; www.cbss.org
Close cooperation between EU Member States and neighbouring countries,
at national, regional and local level, is vital to tackle jointly many
of the challenges in Baltic Sea region, and to exploit fully its
development potential.
The main purpose of this horizontal action is to bring together
stakeholders in the EU and neighbouring countries, especially the
North Western territories of the Russian Federation, in a
constructive, mutually advantageous manner. So far this has been done
through building on two independent but complementary initiatives: the
‘Turku process’ and the ‘Modernisation Partnership for the South East
Baltic Area’ (SEBA) but is open to new projects involving other
neighbouring states in the region.
The ‘Turku process’ is a joint initiative of the cities by
Turku/Regional Council of Southwest Finland, St Petersburg and
Hamburg. The main aim of the ‘Turku process’ is to promote practical
cooperation with Russian partners, building on the trust accumulated
during a significant period of twin city cooperation. It includes a
variety of local actors: cities, regional authorities, universities,
businesses and their representative bodies, civil society
organisations, etc. and thus exemplifies multi-level governance in
practice. The process is a real bottom-up initiative, based on the
commitment of various stakeholders to contribute to the development of
the BSR. The ‘Turku process’ and its activities are an evolving
process, open to interested new partners from around the BSR.
For the South East Baltic Area, the 7 June 2011, CBSS Oslo Ministerial
Declaration initiated a ‘programme of modernisation of the area with
special focus on the Kaliningrad region and its neighbourhood’. The
9th Baltic Sea States Summit on 31 May 2012 developed the idea further
‘to increase the competitiveness and attractiveness of the South
Eastern Baltic Sea Area, including strengthening cooperation of
Kaliningrad oblast and other regions of the Russian Federation in the
Baltic Sea Area with its neighbours’. The CBSS Committee of Senior
Officials and the CBSS Secretariat were tasked with organising this
effort.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the above indicators will be defined.
Actions and flagship projects
NB: several projects in this horizontal action and projects developed
in other priority areas could overlap if due attention is not paid to
this risk. Therefore, the horizontal action leaders will ensure
continuous coordination with the priority areas coordinators
concerned, in order to limit this risk and to work together more
effectively.
Action: Promotion of higher education and professional networks with
innovative enterprises
There is a need to create knowledge networks which include higher
education institutions, local administrations and businesses, based on
the triple helix principle. Expertise sharing and dissemination of
best practices between EU country representatives and third-country
actors is needed in order to jointly develop the Baltic Sea region and
foster innovations in selected sectors.
Potential flagship projects
*
Knowledge Network in Green Housing Technologies in Baltic cities.
Creation of knowledge network on energy efficiency and elaboration
of a mechanism for the direct transfer of best practices on energy
saving, primarily in the construction sector, within the network
of the ‘Turku process’. The long-term objective is to develop a
cross-border green energy and resource-saving cluster, matching
common standards of energy saving in the Baltic Sea region,
including companies from different industries, city authorities
and economic and engineering universities and scientific
institutions.
Action: Strengthening Environmental Cross-Border Competence in the
Baltic Sea Region
Many of the environmental challenges today are broad and have a
cross-sectoral character. Competence and strong and durable
cooperation is key to efficiently solving these challenges. With the
current challenges there is a need to maintain the momentum and to
increase and deepen the current level of cross-border cooperation,
especially with Russia. There is also a high level of competence and
knowledge within the partners and organisations working together in
the BSR today. Stimulation of green growth and emerging businesses are
of specific interest for the partners and activities in the above
mentioned development process. In order to improve practices, a joint
long-term dialogue and development process is needed between
stakeholders in EU countries and third countries.
Potential flagship projects
*
Building education, knowledge sharing and benchmarking capacities
among the involved partners in order to improve the environmental
management in the BSR. One aim of this potential flagship project
is to strengthen environmental management in the Baltic by
creating the Baltic Excellence Cluster for Water Management. The
creation of this cluster would help build technical, operational
and administrative know-how and would give the parties involved
opportunities to export this know-how around the world. The
development of the water management sector requires closer
cooperation and concept development between urban waste-water and
rural waste-water systems. International conference(s) on senior
level to address environmental challenges in the cities of the
Baltic Sea region and to initiate new project proposals for the
next programming period between EU countries and third countries
is also organised.
*
New manure management chains for the Baltic Sea Basin in Russia.
The concentrated, industrial and intensive animal production
(cattle, pigs, and poultry) in the Russian catchment area of the
Baltic Sea is still expanding. The feed for the animals is largely
imported into the area, while the animal manure produced is not
being effectively and safely utilised. This creates a large
nutrient surplus with many environmental effects. The objective of
this potential flagship project is to plan new manure management
chains for one to three animal production units in the Leningrad
and/or Kaliningrad region using the expertise of the project
partners in basic agriculture and plant production, in manure
processing technologies, in the environmental effects of manure
utilisation and in production economics.
Action: Fostering labour market related activities especially in the
cross-border context
The Baltic Sea region is seen as an economically important region in
the EU with high labour mobility. The Baltic Sea region is only
competitive if there is free movement of labour, ideas and goods. This
requires increased mobility in the region to use the available
resources in an optimal way. However, there are a number of issues to
be addressed. On the one hand, the employers in the ‘receiving’
countries have to cope with many challenging legal issues. On the
other, the employees themselves have to know about their rights and
responsibilities. And last but not least the ‘sending’ countries
suffer from the loss of their workforce, especially where there is
excessive ‘brain drain’. Coordinated activities are needed to provide
structured information, enable labour market monitoring, improve
changing of good practices (especially in the border regions) and
involve key partners, including those from third countries, in
dialogue.
Potential flagship projects
*
Information centres network and labour market monitoring in the
BSR. Some cross-border labour market information centres have
started monitoring the labour market or have only been doing so
for a limited time. Continuing this monitoring and starting to do
so in other border regions is very important. It is vital to
develop common indicators in order to produce comparable data.
There are rapid changes in the mobility of the region’s labour
force and there is a need to develop activities and strategies in
response to the challenges those changes pose. Border region
information centres are structured differently and different
problems exist but there are also many problems in common. It
would be mutually beneficial to learn from the experience of
others and to exchange ideas, solutions and methods.
*
Baltic Sea Labour Forum cooperation with Russia. The Baltic Sea
Labour Forum (BSLF) – working together through social dialogue –
was established in November 2011 in Hamburg. The core aim of the
Forum is to promote social dialogue and tripartite structures,
since cooperation is a crucial element of sustainable economic
growth and social development in the Baltic Sea region. The Forum
is a network for the exchange of experience and communication and
aims to promote cooperation between the key actors (based on the
BSLF memorandum of understanding). However the engagement of
Russian partners, who have been involved in the BSLF discussions,
is not guaranteed. But as part of the Baltic Sea region, Russia is
an important partner and must therefore be involved in the active
work of the Forum.
*
Speed up development of transnational mobility in the Baltic Sea
Region. Transnational mobility actions are considered a central
issue in the process of making Europe a society and economy based
on knowledge that is a reference for the other areas of the world.
The modern labour market in many countries suffers a range of
problems connected both with lack of qualified personnel and with
insufficient competence of already available labour force. The aim
of this potential flagship project is to establish content-related
networking structures between Baltic Sea region cities in order to
realize a fostered implementation of mobility. Several target
groups will be included e.g. a) apprentices in initial vocational
education, b) qualified employees, c) teachers, d) students.
Action: Promoting youth and student exchanges and co-operation in the
Baltic Sea Region
Increased cooperation between young people and their organisations,
learning from each other, increased students and young researchers
exchange, is a key element to ensure that the mutual cooperation and
integration in the BSR will continue in the future. Existing
multilateral organisations at a sub-state level such as the Union of
Baltic Cities and its Commission on Youth Issues, bilateral twinning
agreements, multilateral university relations (including the Baltic
Sea Region University Network BSRUN) and bilateral university
agreements, exchanges between Junior Chambers of Commerce and others
can contribute towards this aim.
Flagship projects
Under preparation by the ‘Turku process’.
Action: Develop sustainable cross-border areas for tourism and
economic development
The action aims at fostering sustainable cross-border tourism between
the EU Member States and Russia, by developing to this aim relevant
settings and establishing new practices in identified cross-border
areas. The first two areas for this development are: Vistytis/Gross
Rominent natural park in the Kaliningrad region (on the border with
Lithuania), and Lake Peipsi Area in Pskov Oblast (on the border with
Estonia). This action aims at establishing operational linkages and
cooperation between its own flagship projects and those implemented
under EUSBSR priority area ‘Tourism’.
Flagship projects
*
Vistytis/Rominten forest (Vistynets lake/Krasnolesye) natural park
and tourist cluster. The objective of this project is to develop a
transnational cross-border natural park through the networking
model establishing links between the municipalities, regional and
national authorities, private businesses, ecologists, NGOs and the
creative sector in Russia (Kaliningrad region), Lithuania and
Poland. The project will be carried out within 2 years
(2013–2014). Within the framework of this project, the cooperation
with the NCM project on the development of the creative industries
in the Kaliningrad region is foreseen. In addition, there are
plans for an exchange of experience with the Peipsi Lake
cross-border projects. The main activities include:
*
Exploring and mapping the park’s potential through a series of
interdisciplinary expeditions of researchers and artists. The main
aim is to creatively re-think the natural area in its unity and
complexity, to develop links with local municipalities,
authorities and population and to produce an innovative
multi-media publication as a result.
*
Developing a network of cross-border actors (municipalities,
regional and national authorities, private businesses, ecologists,
NGOs and the creative sector).
*
Developing and implementing a model of sustainable tourism in the
natural park by actively involving the local population and by
attracting a specific target tourist audience: ecologically-minded
youth, creative sector etc.
Lead: to be determined. Deadline: 2014.
*
Economically and Environmentally Sustainable Lake Peipsi Area. The
objective of this project is to improve the environmental
situation of the Lake Peipsi basin by establishing and renovating
waste-water treatment facilities in Pskov Oblast and by
developing modern infrastructure in small harbours on the Estonian
side of Lake Peipsi. The project is to be carried out within three
years and the planned activities on the Russian side are:
*
Inspection of the waste-water treatment facilities in 16 areas in
the Lake Peipsi basin;
*
Construction and reconstruction of waste-water treatment
facilities in Pskov City and in the Gdovsky, Pskovsky, Pechorsky
and Palkinsky areas.
On the Estonian side modern infrastructure that meets environmental
requirements will be established in three harbours: Tartu, Mustvee and
Räpina. In Kallaste harbour, a dock which is needed for ship
reparation and maintenance, will be constructed. The project involves
11 partners from Estonia and Russia. The total project budget is
8362897 EUR. Estonia’s contribution is 2317477 EUR. Lead: Estonian
Ministry of the Interior. Deadline for progress review: to be
determined.
Action: Development of Private-Public Partnerships (PPP)
Successful collaboration between public- and private-sector actors is
considered as a key to prosperous development in the Baltic Sea
region. This also applies to joint cross-border cooperation activities
between EU Member States and Russia, in pursuit of common regional
development goals. This action will foster and enhance the development
of PPPs in the region, most and foremost by providing joint support
formats for new PPP initiatives in the region, involving partners from
the EU Member States and Russia.
Flagship projects
*
CBSS Pilot Financial Initiative. Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)
CBSS PFI, a new financing tool for sustainable economic
development in the region, was signed back-to-back with the 9th
Baltic Sea States Summit’ in Stralsund, Germany, on 31 May 2012.
The PFI is a project that offers a financing opportunity to small
and medium-sized enterprises and public-private partnerships. It
focuses initially on Russian parts of SEBA and North West Russia,
but shall be expanded to other parts of the CBSS region, depending
on the accession of additional partner financial institutions to
the PFI. Three fields of cooperation relevant to the PFI are:
finance for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the field
of innovation, modernisation, and energy efficiency; PPP projects
focusing on sustainable development in areas such as municipal and
regional infrastructure, energy efficiency, ecology and climate
protection; and non-financial cooperation such as conferences,
seminars, round tables, trainings related to the above-mentioned
areas. Lead: CBSS Secretariat. Deadline: 2012.
Action: Cultural heritage and creative industries
This action aims to boost cross-border cooperation for sustainable
regional development through culture, cultural heritage, and public
events. Experiences and practices in regional cultural heritage
potential development will be collected and clustered in order to
build a regional and cross-border network. Creative industries’
practices will be endorsed as a core tool to ensure a level of
regional development and building common basis for cross-border
cooperation on cultural heritage. An approach to foster creative
industries’ development as a key to prosperity and high
competitiveness of the region will be put forward. This action is
supported by an approach that joint strategic employment of creative
industries between the EU Member States and Russia can provide a
highly added value in terms of developing a unique level of
competitiveness and prosperity in the region.
Flagship projects
*
SEBA cultural and creative industries network. The project aims to
connect regional actors interested in developing activities
through cooperation models in creative industries. It will provide
both a forum to gather and exchange experiences collection and the
knowledge necessary to develop a successful creative sector and
event management practices in the region. The network will be
based on the existing partnership between Kaliningrad and the
Nordic countries developed in the framework of the NCM supported
project led by the Tranzit Agency61. Lead: to be determined.
Deadline: 2013.
*
BalticLab. This flagship project is aimed at young emerging
talents in the creative industries and at project start-ups in the
Baltic Sea region. Its objective is to engage young talent in the
Baltic region in a setting that they would find inspiring and to
provide participants with networking opportunities, as well as
help them build skills and tools for further success. The project
was launched in December 2012 with a networking event, which
identified the format of BalticLab (thematic workshops tailored
according regional needs in field of creative industries and
entrepreneurship) to be implemented in 2013. Successful
implementation of this project may lead to a further follow-up
project. Lead: CBSS secretariat and the Swedish Institute.
Deadline: 2013.
Action: Fostering cross-border cooperation through youth exchange and
exchange in higher education
Develop initiatives for both, non-formal and formal (higher education)
youth exchanges in order to strengthen interconnectedness of regional
concerns, to jointly develop patterns for cooperation aimed at
enhancing societal, environmental and economic partnerships in the
region. This will be achieved through establishing exchange
initiatives for youth and higher education students, targeted at
discussing themes of high relevance to the region. This action will
bring into collaboration non-formal and formal (higher education)
actors in the region and provide the necessary political support.
Flagship projects
*
CBSS Summer youth camp. A project builds on existing youth
exchanges in the South Eastern Baltic Area and on experiences in
international non-formal education exchange programmes between EU
Member States and Russia. Young people from the EU BSR countries
and from Russia will be invited to meet at a summer session to
discuss and share views on issues of regional relevance including
the environment, sustainability, cultural heritage, and regional
cultural mapping. A pilot project took place in Kaliningrad in
August 2012. Depending on the interest expressed by Member States,
it may alter the initial location to another place in SEBA. Lead:
CBSS Secretariat. Deadline: 2014.
*
CBSS Summer university. This flagship project will establish a
summer seminar for higher education students in order to create an
appropriate platform for discussing issues that are considered of
high relevance to the region, including that of cross-border
cooperation initiatives between the EU Member States and Russia.
This seminar will serve as an indicator for regional concerns that
young future professionals and academics may have about the future
of the Baltic Sea region. It will also bring together interested
higher education institutions in the region in a dialogue that may
lead to closer collaboration on practices to further academic
inquiry into the issue of macro-regional cooperation in the Baltic
Sea region (including formalised joint courses/programmes on
subjects tailored to regional needs). Lead: CBSS Secretariat.
Deadline: 2014.
*
EUROFACULTY PSKOV. The EuroFaculty Pskov is an educational
development project launched in 2009 in the Region of Pskov in
Western Russia, close to the border of Estonia and Latvia. The aim
of the project is to upgrade university education in business
economics/business administration at the recently created Pskov
State University (PskovSU) which is a result of the merger of five
educational institutions in Pskov. Following the success of the
first phase of the project and based on a favourable assessment of
the work carried out at the CBSS Member States agreed to continue
to support the project. Thus the second three-year (2012-2015)
phase of the project was launched in September 2012 with revised
objectives and an even greater university base around the Baltic
Sea area. Lead: Sweden and the International Expert Group for the
EuroFaculty project in Pskov. Deadline: 2015.
HA Promo – Boosting joint promotion and regional identity building
actions
------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Baltic Metropoles Network and Baltic Development Forum
www.baltmet.org; www.bdforum.org
The horizontal action ‘Promo’ highlights the region’s strengths and
helps to join forces in the internal and external promotion of the
region. The overall goal is to strengthen the competitiveness of the
Baltic Sea region and to show that the region fulfils the Europe 2020
Strategy goals of being a smart, sustainable and inclusive region.
The branding and regional identity building of the Baltic Sea region
is a long-term plan for earning and maintaining a distinctive,
positive and competitive regional reputation, both within the region
and around the world. These aims could be achieved through a
strategic, harmonised and audience-aware approach to innovation,
policy-making, international relations and public diplomacy,
investment and export promotion, tourism and cultural relations.
The roles of horizontal action ‘Promo’ are to collect information on
and communicate about various branding and regional identity-building
actions and to boost cross-sectoral branding cooperation.
The branding and identity building of the Baltic Sea region have been
on the high-level political agenda for over a decade. Many
policy-makers have agreed that the Baltic Sea region needs a clearer
and more competitive brand identity for the following purposes:
*
to achieve more effective investment promotion;
*
to attract more visitors for leisure and business travel and
tourism;
*
to attract and retain the best and the brightest talent;
*
to leverage exports through an improved ‘region of origin’ effect;
*
to build on complementarities of strengths between mature and
transitioning economies.
The benefits of pooling resources are clear: it delivers more global
outreach and attention, economies of scale and increases resources for
transnational product development.
Despite the high-level interest in joint promotion, the marketing and
branding of the region has not yet developed in a structured and
systematic way. Neither does the Baltic Sea region exist as a region
with a shared identity and recognised image. The region does not
display a common identity that could support a proper brand-building
effort. Actions that would generate more ‘we-feeling’ in the region
are very much needed. The image of the region and the way it is
perceived by outsiders may affect the way it is seen by the locals and
vice versa.
The EUSBSR provides a framework for coordination and collaboration but
also a long-term perspective for the region’s branding and
identity-building efforts. This framework needs to be filled with
content and projects, and it is up to the different pan-Baltic,
national, regional and local actors to do so across the various
priority areas in a coordinated, inclusive and collaborative manner.
Branding and regional identity building is a cross-cutting topic. Many
priority areas, such as for instance ‘Ship’, ‘Tourism’, ‘Culture’,
‘Innovation’ and ‘SME’ have already set related agendas. Horizontal
action ‘Promo’ will work closely with all relevant priority areas and
other regional stakeholders in order to raise awareness of various
branding elements of the region and bring relevant actors together in
order to find complementarities and to pool resources. Stakeholders
could include policy-makers, locals and experts from the BSR states,
cities and regions within the Baltic Sea region. For instance, tourism
and investment promotion agencies, universities, producers of cultural
events and NGOs could contribute towards the set targets.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
The target is to increase the number of joint promotion and marketing
activities of the Baltic Sea region, as well as cultural
collaborations of the BSR, both in the region and outside the region.
‘Joint promotion’ refers to activities, which are conducted by
stakeholders representing at least two BSR countries.
The target can be measured in terms of concrete marketing projects,
products, campaigns and events (for example tourism promotion,
investment promotion, promotion of BSR as a higher education area,
transnational culture activities).
Objective
Indicator
Baseline
Target values/situation
Information sources
Joint promotion of the region.
Shared branding elements for the Baltic Sea region including:
- joint marketing campaigns and events;
- joint marketing products;
- joint cultural collaborations.
Number of joint marketing campaigns, events and products, joint
cultural collaborations during the past three years.
Increase of number of joint marketing campaigns, events and products,
joint cultural collaborations during the past three years, leading by
2016 to a joint framework for coherent and long-lasting
collaborations.
Situation analysis on ‘Place branding and place promotion efforts in
the Baltic Sea region’.
Bi-annual update by HAL
Joint promotion of the regional identity
Shared local news at BSR media space
(Newswave service similar to PressEurope).
As there are no existing services comparable to NewsWave, there can be
no proper standards
(only polennu.dk and PressEurop as comparison).
Establishment of a media covering the entire BSR (previously
non-existent).
Google Analytics: number of news items produced around the BSR and
number of subscribers.
Actions and flagship projects
The actions involve awareness- and visibility-raising exercises,
policy round tables, opinion surveys and marketing campaigns for the
promotion of the region, especially in the fields of tourism,
investment promotion and talent attraction. A ‘positive image the
Baltic Sea region public relations campaign’ to promote the region is
also planned.
The most recent situation analysis on ‘Place branding and place
promotion efforts in the Baltic Sea region’ was conducted in 2010 by
BDF as part of the BaltMet Promo project, led by the City of Helsinki.
The BaltMet Promo project piloted the making of transnational BSR
products and services for tourists, talents and investors in the
global markets. During the project, the horizontal action leaders also
produced a study on the history of the identity of the region and led
several marketing and promotional campaigns.
Action: Boosting joint promotion of the region
The horizontal action leaders will organise annual/bi-annual events in
collaboration with other BSR actors that bring together organisations
from a broad range of BSR interests (state, region and city actors,
NGO’s, businesses, BRS networks) in order to discuss BSR issues but
also find cooperation possibilities in many fields including putting
together new projects.
A network of Baltic Sea Region Investment Promotion Agencies has just
been established. There is also interest in academic cooperation in
the region. Concrete collaborations are under development.
Flagship projects
*
ONE BSR is an umbrella project, which gathers branding elements of
the BSR and produces an elaborated set of images and identities of
the region. The appeal of the Baltic Sea region, successfully
proved at remote markets in the predecessor BaltMet Promo project,
shall be transformed into tailor-made BSR offerings for tourists,
talents and investors in cooperation with private partners and
local people. ONE BSR facilitates the branding and regional
identity-building dialogue of the BSR. Lead: City of Helsinki.
Deadline: September 2014.
Action: Building regional identity
Flagship project
*
NewsWave is a regional daily news website, which aims to improve
information exchange and cross-border communication in the Baltic
Sea macro-region and promote a more distinct regional identity or
we-feeling. The NewsWave project will engage local young news
spotters in delivering stories for the website. All news will be
redistributed to a network of receivers in all the countries
(newspapers, news exchange bureaus and magazines). A network of
bloggers from all countries will be attached to the website.
NewsWave intends to fill the information gap in the area and
address the urge for more communication in the EUSBSR plan. The
target group will be citizens, businesses, policy makers, experts
and the creative community of the region. The website will be in
English, politically neutral, interactive, open minded and using
the best tradition of public service journalism. A professional
‘media board’ will be established. The NewsWave is piloted as part
of the ONE BSR project. If successful, it shall be extended and
further developed in a follow-up project. Lead: Baltic Development
Forum. Deadline: pilot phase under ONE BSR ends in September 2014,
extension phase: to be determined.
HA Spatial Planning – Encouraging the use of Maritime and Land-based
Spatial Planning in all Member States around the Baltic Sea and
develop a common approach for cross-border cooperation
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: VASAB and HELCOM
http://www.helcom.fi/groups/en_GB/MSPWG/
This horizontal action is of key importance in ensuring consistency
between actions and in maintaining an integrated approach. Without a
clear picture of the region, and an awareness of sensitive areas,
populations, economic pressures and other factors, sustainable
development is not feasible. This is true both for the situation at
sea and for that on land.
Increased activities in the Baltic Sea have led to competition for
limited marine space between sectoral interests, such as shipping and
maritime transport, extraction of gravel and minerals, offshore
energy, ports development, tourism, fisheries and aquaculture in
addition to environmental concerns.62 Maritime Spatial Planning (MSP)
and Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) are an important tool
and process for improved decision making. It helps users to balance
sectoral interests that compete for marine space, and contributes to
achieving sustainable use of marine areas to the benefit of economic
and social development as well as the marine environment. The
development of a Maritime Planning and coastal management (CM)
framework for the Baltic Sea, by applying the ecosystem approach, is
encouraged at national level as well as common cross-border
cooperation for the implementation of MSP in the Baltic Sea according
to the regional set of MSP principles adopted by all Baltic Sea
countries within VASAB (Vision and Strategies around the Baltic Sea
Region) and HELCOM. These regional MSP principles which are
tailor-made for the Baltic Sea are in line with the key common EU
principles set out in the Commission’s Roadmap for MSP.
The EU and the HELCOM Contracting States have agreed in the context of
the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan to develop an integrated MSP
process. Furthermore, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to
advance MSP within VASAB, HELCOM, the Baltic Regional Advisory Council
and the Nordic Council of Ministers. Through the now completed Plan
Bothnia project, the European Commission launched preparatory actions
to test the implementation of the Baltic MSP principles in a
cross-border context in the Baltic Sea region. The transnational
INTERREG project BaltSeaPlan is another important project that has
already been carried out in that respect.
The joint HELCOM-VASAB Maritime Spatial Planning Working Group, which
was established in 2010, has become the regional platform to ensure
cooperation between BSR countries to ensure coherent MSP processes in
the cross-border context. This important process needs support at the
highest political level in the participating countries.
Land-based spatial planning has been carried out by all BSR countries
at national, regional and local level. VASAB63 has established a
common platform to allow partners to meet, network, exchange knowledge
and experiences and sketched a first common spatial vision for the
Baltic Sea region – ‘Vision and Strategies around the Baltic Sea 2010’
– (VASAB 2010) that was adopted by ministers responsible for spatial
planning in Tallinn in 1994. The VASAB Long Term Perspective for the
Territorial Development of the Baltic Sea Region64 (LTP) is the latest
contribution to these efforts and should be taken into account by the
coordinators of other priority areas when they address spatial
objectives, conditions and impacts of their actions. The LTP
concentrates on issues which require transnational solutions such as
urban networking and urban-rural cooperation, improving external and
internal accessibility and the development of maritime spatial
planning.
As part of the implementation process of the EUSBSR, the LTP is being
implemented through a number of short-to-medium and long-term actions
together with stakeholders of the region. In particular, attention has
to be paid to the territorial disparities in the BSR: 1) the East-West
divide, 2) the North-South divide (especially the better integration
of the northernmost territories to the Baltic Sea region networks).
The implementation of LTP should be continued through further actions
in different priority fields and through transnational projects.
An example is the ESPON project BSR-TeMo, which will provide evidence
on territorial development and cohesion in the BSR by developing an
indicator-based monitoring system. This monitoring system shall
comprise a policy dimension, related to the promotion of territorial
cohesion in the BSR, and a methodological dimension aimed at
developing an indicator-based to monitor territorial development in
the BSR.
The VASAB Committee for Spatial Planning and Development of the Baltic
Sea Region should continue acting as a coordination platform for
territorial development activities in the region, in close cooperation
with the Council of Baltic Sea States.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Indicator
Baseline
Target/deadline
Data sources
Drawing up and application of trans boundary, ecosystem-based Maritime
Spatial Plans.
None in 2011.
Pilot plans in 2013.
Drawing up and application throughout the region in 2020.
European Commission, DG MARE, national ministries, HELCOM-VASAB
Maritime Spatial Planning Working Group, European Territorial
Cooperation programmes’ reports where relevant: Plan Bothnia,
BaltSeaPlan projects.
Implementation of this horizontal action is directly linked to
indicators and targets at a strategic level for the EUSBSR under the
objective ‘Save the Sea’.
The understanding of the indicator is such that the Baltic Sea
countries should aim at developing national maritime spatial plans by
applying an ecosystem approach, and that the planning should be
coherent across borders, which entails close cross-border cooperation.
This indicator is also linked to indicators and targets at a strategic
level for the EUSBSR under several objectives, including sub-objective
‘Good transport conditions’ (improved internal and external
connectivity) and sub-objective ‘Improved global competitiveness of
the Baltic Sea region’ (positive influence on reducing differences in
the average GDP and Human Development Index between the best and worst
performing Member States in the region).
The overall goal of this horizontal action is to achieve territorial
cohesion perspective in the BSR by 2030, i.e. the region is a
well-integrated and coherent macro-region, and it has overcome the
socio-economic development divides between its individual parts and
turned the global challenges into assets.
Actions and flagship projects
Flagship project
*
PartiSEApate – Multi-level Governance in MSP (Maritime Spatial
Planning) throughout the Baltic Sea Region. The project’s main
goal is to develop a pan-Baltic approach to marine topics that
have a spatial dimension that go beyond the national borders (i.e.
nature protection areas, grid connections, shipping lanes) and
thus to create a transnational framework for multi-level
governance in MSP. Partners will develop a concept for an
institutional framework for MSP and governance model for coherent
planning of cross-border issues (including transnational
consultation, MSP data exchange network), which will provide input
to policy decisions taken at the ministerial level in the BSR
countries. The project builds on the results of existing network,
the HELCOM-VASAB MSP Working Group, and the completed Baltic
projects: PlanBothnia, BaltSeaPlan, PlanCoast, East-WestWindow and
BaltCoast. The project was designed in line with their findings to
promote and improve the quality and performance of result-oriented
transnational efforts in maritime spatial planning. The project is
composed of two pillars. The first one aims at practical testing
of the existing in the BSR documents, guidelines and principles
related to the cross-border MSP. The second pillar is devoted to
strengthening transnational stakeholder involvement in the BSR in
MSP. The project was initiated by the authorities responsible for
MSP in the BSR, the research community and non-governmental
organisations. Altogether 11 partners from almost all BSR
countries joined the project. The HELCOM-VASAB MSP Working Group
has assumed the role of project Advisory Group. The project
received co-financing from the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme
2007–2013. Duration of the project is from June 2012 until
September 2014. Lead: Maritime Institute in Gdańsk, Poland.
Deadline: 2014. Progress review: HELCOM Ministerial Meeting in
2013 and VASAB Ministerial Conference in 2014.
HA Sustainable development and bio-economy
------------------------------------------
Coordinated by: Council of Baltic Sea States Secretariat for
sustainable development
Nordic Council of Ministers for bio-economy
www.cbss.org; www.norden.org
1. Sustainable development
The concept and political leading principle of sustainable development
reconciles economic, environmental and social objectives. Many of the
challenges for sustainability today worldwide are also at stake in the
Baltic Sea region. These include growing demand for energy, climate
change, and insufficient sustainable use of natural resources both in
the sea and on land. UN Rio+20 acknowledges the need to further
mainstream sustainable development at all levels, integrating
economic, social and environmental aspects and recognizing their
inter-linkages, so as to achieve sustainable development in all its
dimensions.65
The aim of the horizontal action is to support the transition of the
Baltic Sea region into a sustainable and prosperous macro-region, to
communicate best practices and to assist in the development of
innovative practices in the implementation of the themes of the
horizontal action in cooperation with relevant priority areas within
the EUSBSR in line with Europe 2020 Strategy, its resource efficiency
flagships, the proposed 7th Environmental Action Programme and the EU
Sustainable Development Strategy, EU SDS. The horizontal action takes
a transnational, integrated and cross-sectoral approach to the global
challenge of sustainable development by linking existing transnational
public, sectorial and NGO-based cooperation, regional development and
research projects and other activities within the EUSBSR as well as
defining and filling potential gaps and developing new potentials.
The activities in the horizontal action are based on the overarching
theme of sustainable development, focussing on Climate Change and
promoting the Baltic Sea region as a Green Region.
The horizontal action aims to:
1.
increase coordination and synergy among initiatives and projects
dealing with sustainable development in the Baltic Sea region;
2.
promote sustainable consumption and production as well as
sustainable lifestyles in the Baltic Sea region;
3.
consolidate findings and disseminate good examples, methods and
experiences in the field to a larger audience in the Baltic Sea
region as well as facilitate the follow-up activities and
integrative cross-sectorial policy discussions and alignment of
policies in the Baltic Sea region countries;
4.
support the transition towards a climate adapted and low carbon
Baltic Sea region;
5.
cluster already existing activities and projects in the field of
climate adaptation and mitigation and promote science-policy
dialogues;
6.
establish networks and dialogue amongst actors across national and
sectorial borders in the Baltic Sea region in order to develop
common data and knowledge bases, methods and strategies for
macro-regional climate adaptation and mitigation.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/ sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline Value (2012)
Target values/ deadline
Information sources for Baseline and Target
Cooperation: Increased coordination and synergy in the BSR among
public sector and NGO cooperation initiatives, projects and
stakeholders dealing with sustainable development.
Number of macro-regional projects resulting in the integration of
sustainable development objectives in national-, regional or local
action plans.
TBC.
30.
Responsible National ministries in BSR countries; EU European
Territorial Cooperation programmes BLA21F; ICLEI; BONUS Programme.
Climate Change Mitigation: Becoming a low-carbon region.
The BSR share of EU energy consumption produced from renewable
resources, and greenhouse gas emissions levels.
Energy Efficiency Index.
1990 levels.
Average for the BSS region in 2010 = xy %.66
Reaching the RES share targets by BSR countries as envisaged in the EU
climate and energy package by 2020.
Reaching GHG mitigation targets for non-ETS sectors by BSR countries
by 2020.67
Europe 2020 target on energy efficiency by 2020 should be adapted to
the BSS.68
Eurostat.
EUROSTAT annual data available with 2 year time lag.
Climate Change Adaptation: Becoming a region adapted to the expected
impacts of climate change
Macro-regional Climate Change Adaptation Strategy (CCAS) and its
Action Plan developed and
endorsed by BSR countries;
Adoption of national Climate Change adaptation policies.
0
0
TBC.
Outline ready by 2013.
CCAS endorsed by all BSR EU member States by 2020.
Climate Change adaptation policies adopted by all BSR EU Member States
by 2020.
BALTADAPT project.
Responsible national ministries in BSR countries.
Transnational and national policy documents revised/adopted addressing
impacts of climate change in BSR.
TBC.
Number by 2015
National ministries; European Commission.
Actions and flagship projects
Action: ‘Green economy’
The Baltic Sea region has a great potential to be a model region for
green economy and to be world leading when it comes to the development
of knowledge-intensive products and services, eco-innovations, as well
as environmental technology, which can increase competitiveness and
create new business opportunities that at the same time reduce
negative environmental impacts. A greener economy will furthermore
lead to a diversification of services and products and allow for new
employment opportunities while protecting and conserving biodiversity
and natural resources, promoting human well-being and equality.
During the last decade, many Baltic Sea region countries acquired
considerable experience in the development of sustainable energy
solutions and environmentally friendly technologies in various fields,
including agriculture, forest management, water management, waste
management, healthy lifestyles. However, great diversity remains with
respect to both socio-economic developments and the implementation of
sustainable practices. In order to make the BSR more resilient to
future environmental, societal and economic challenges, macro-regional
approaches to these issues need to be developed.
The action aims at supporting the transition of the Baltic Sea region
into a green region that results in ‘improved human well-being and
social equity, while significantly reducing environmental risks and
ecological scarcities’.69
Flagship projects
*
Baltic Green Public Procurement, Baltic GPP in cooperation with PA
SME. Public procurement constitutes 16-20% of GDP in Europe. This
enormous amount of public sector money can through informed
decisions move the market into a more sustainable direction.
Sustainable procurement can stimulate innovation and turn the
public sector into a driving force in developing a green economy.
Baltic GPP will establish a wide capacity building programme on
Green Public Procurement (GPP) within Core Procurement
Institutions (CPIs) across the Baltic Sea region, based on
commonly applied training materials and purchasing actions of
major Public Procurement across the Baltic Sea region. Buying
innovative, eco-efficient products and services will significantly
reduce environmental pollution and build up necessary know-how and
capacities. Lead: Swedish Environmental Council, SEMCO. Deadline:
31 December 2013.
*
EFFECT – BSR Dialogue Platform on Energy and Resource Efficiency.
EFFECT’s main aim is to map, foster and communicate good practice
solutions in eco-efficiency that attract and enable cities,
villages and BSR sub-regions as well as other relevant actors from
the local, regional, national and pan-Baltic level to jointly
develop and implement policies and concrete actions on becoming
more energy and resource efficient, sustainable and resilient,
while stimulating a greener economy. In the long term these
activities will contribute to the creation of resilient societies
and the promotion of the Baltic Sea region as a green region. Lead:
CBSS-Baltic21. Deadline: 31 August 2015.
*
Create a network of sustainable cities and villages. The aim of
the project is to exchange knowledge and good practices on
environmentally friendly city management practices. Lead: Sweden.
Deadline: 31 August 2015.
*
Ecovillages. The project Ecovillages aims at fostering Ecovillages
development as more sustainable way of living in rural areas of
the Baltic Sea region. Lead: Lithuania. Deadline: December 2013.
Potential flagship projects and activities:70
*
REALS: Resilience and Ecology approaches for living
Sustainability. Project aims at sharing experience of
eco-technologies for rural development and promoting the idea of
more sustainable lifestyle approaches in the urban and rural
societies of the BSR.
Addition to the flagship projects, other expected outcomes of the
horizontal action are:
*
increased coordination and synergy among initiatives dealing with
different aspects of sustainable development;
*
clustering the relevant projects;
*
disseminating best practices and examples in the field as well as
facilitating the cross-sectorial policy discussions.
This could include: Green Agriculture for a Bluer Baltic Sea (GABBS)
conference. The BSR wide agro-environmental conference that aims at
sharing knowledge and good practice examples among the agricultural
and environmental sector on best practices in the agri-environmental
technology sector in the BSR in order to save the sea on land. The
conference organised in cooperation with BSR projects (Baltic Manure,
Baltic Compact, Baltic Deal and Beras) dealing with sustainable
agriculture as well as priority areas ‘Nutri’ and ‘Agri’.
Action: ‘Climate change and migitation’
Climate change is perhaps the most pressing environmental issue in the
world today. The effects of climate change are already being seen – in
the Baltic Sea region and in the world. Many countries have made
cutting greenhouse gas emissions their main environmental priority.
However, further actions need to be taken to keep climate change below
the 2°C-limit. Our region has a great potential for innovation in the
field of renewable energy by using the sea, wind and biomass, which
can reduce our dependency on fossil fuel, and it has a huge potential
in the field of energy efficiency.
Flagship projects
*
Implement fully the EU – Russia Energy Efficiency Initiative,
particularly the annual work programmes of the Joint EU – Russia
Thematic Group on Energy Efficiency of the EU – Russia Energy
Dialogue, to be implemented jointly by the EU and Russian side.
Lead: European Commission, DG ENERGY. Deadline: to be determined.
Action: ‘Climate change adaptation’
Climate change is one of the most pressing environmental issues today.
The Baltic Sea with its coastal zones is a specific eco-region, where
impacts from climate change can also be expected to be specific. The
riparian BSR countries are thus all sharing a vulnerability to climate
change with possible impacts on human security, environment and
competiveness. In response to climate change, it is important to work
not only on mitigation measures, the reduction of emissions of
greenhouse gases, but also on strategies to adapt to the changes that
are being experienced as well as those that are foreseen.
Several national, regional and local initiatives to adapt to climate
change are already under way in the Baltic Sea region. However,
further actions need to be taken. Therefore, facing up to the
challenge to adapt to climate requires cooperation both between
countries and between sectors in the BSR.
The establishment and implementation of a macro-regional climate
change adaptation strategy and action plan will strengthen efforts to
such cooperation, based on understanding and coping with specific
impacts within the BSR. It is necessary for national, regional and
local actors to cooperate on joint efforts on adaptation, including
exchange of experiences, sharing of common knowledge and data bases,
development and implementation of national climate adaptation
strategies and action plans as well as sharing of ‘best practices’ for
specific sectors within the BSR that are proven to be economically,
socially and environmentally sustainable.
The consistency of the climate change adaptation strategy with actions
at EU level further to the White paper from the European Commission on
adaptation needs to be ensured. This issue could be addressed in the
Impacts and Adaptation Steering Group proposed in the White Paper.
Ensuring complementarities with EU-wide initiatives, a regional
strategy should focus on issues of cross border interest in the region
such as: developing a more robust evidence base on the impacts and
consequences of climate change, raising awareness of the need for
action; ensuring and measuring progress (using indicators as benchmark
for measuring progress) and recommending early action to ensure that
adaptation is integrated in key policy areas – this means reviewing
policies in the light of the risks of climate change and considering
options for adaptive action. Further, the involvement of Russia in
operational activities related to the elaboration on joint efforts
concerning a climate change adaptation strategy for the whole Baltic
Sea region could be considered.
Flagship projects
*
*
BALTADAPT. The aim is to develop a Baltic Sea region wide
adaptation strategy and action plan. The strategy will be
macro-regional and will focus on the sea and coastal areas in the
Baltic region. Lead: Denmark, responsible for the development of
the Strategy: Sweden. Deadline: 2013.
Potential flagship projects71
*
Climate change adaptation and civil security (in cooperation with
priority area ‘Safe’).
*
Cost-benefit analyses on climate change adaptation for the Baltic
Sea Region and building and use of common science-based platforms
for policy and sectorial dialogues integrating climate adaptation
with other aspects of sustainable development (in cooperation with
relevant priority areas).
*
Cooperation in the field of climate change, where cooperation
between schools and universities working in this field could be
set up (in cooperation with PAC Hamburg on ‘Education’).
2. Bio-economy
The Baltic Sea region has everything it takes to become a global
leader in sustainable biomass production and the biomass value-chain.
We have a large concentration of biomass, well-developed
infrastructure, technological and environmental knowledge and a long
tradition for cooperation across the region. However, there is a need
to develop cooperation across the region and across sectors. Also,
there is a need to strengthen the cooperation between research and
innovation, public organisations and private business at the
macro-regional, national and local levels.
The concept of bio-economy reconciles economic, environmental and
social objectives. Many of the global challenges for the development
of a sustainable bio-economy today are also at stake in the Baltic Sea
region. This includes amongst others population growth, growing demand
for food, renewable resources for industry and energy, climate change,
and in particular insufficient sustainable use of natural resources
both in the sea and on land. The UN Rio+20 conference acknowledges the
need to further mainstream sustainable development at all levels,
integrating economic, social and environmental aspects and recognizing
their inter-linkages, so as to achieve sustainable development in all
its dimensions.72
On a global scale the bio-economy deals with a transition from a
fossil based economy to a more bio-based economy. Hence, the aim of
the horizontal action is to explore how this transformation can be
used as a tool to implement sustainable development. Increased demand
on food, bioenergy and other bio-based products provides a great
potential for economic growth. But it also implies risks for
unsustainable development. There is a clear need to promote a
decoupling of economic growth from environmental degradation.
Therefore the horizontal action will focus on sustainable solutions
throughout the entire value chain from biomass to food, bioenergy and
bio-based products, looking at its potential to create solutions for
sustainable economic, social and environmental development.
To do so, there is a need for pooling forces and bringing together
public and private players in closer partnerships. The horizontal
action will contribute to the overall ambitions in the EUSBSR to
promote sustainability and prosperity. The horizontal action will put
focus on sustainable biomass production for food, fibre and energy and
its use in an environmental, technical, social and economic
perspective and link it to regional, sustainable development.
The horizontal action is closely linked with relevant priority areas
within the EUSBSR and in line with Europe 2020 Strategy and
‘Innovation for Sustainable Growth: A Bio economy’.73 The horizontal
action takes a transnational, integrated and cross-sectoral approach
to the global challenge of bio-economy by linking existing
transnational public, sectorial and NGO-based cooperation, regional
development and research projects and other activities within the
EUSBSR as well as defining and filling eventual gaps and developing
new potentials.
The horizontal action aims to:
1.
support the transition towards a bio-economy for the Baltic Sea
region;
2.
to explore how to transform the increased demand on food,
bio-based products for industrial use and bioenergy into
sustainable solutions in the entire value chain. Increase
coordination and synergy among initiatives and projects dealing
with bio-economy in the Baltic Sea region;
3.
promote sustainable production and use of biomass in the Baltic
Sea region;
4.
cluster already existing activities and projects in the field of
bio-economy and promote science-policy dialogues;
5.
pooling forces and bringing together public and private players in
closer partnerships;
6.
establish networks and dialogue amongst actors across national and
sectorial borders in the Baltic Sea region in order to develop
common data and knowledge base, methods and strategies for a
knowledge based sustainable bio-economy;
7.
consolidate findings and disseminate good examples, methods and
experiences in the field to a larger audience in the Baltic Sea
region as well as facilitate the follow-up activities and
integrative cross-sectorial policy discussions and alignment of
policies in the Baltic Sea region countries.
Targets and indicators
A comprehensive system for the design, the monitoring and the
follow-up of indicators and targets will be set up in 2013, under the
responsibility of the horizontal action leaders. The still missing
targets and deadline, baseline, and statistics/information sources
related to the below indicators will be defined.
Objective/ sub-objective
Indicator
Baseline Value (2013)
Target values/deadline
Information sources for Baseline and Target
Cooperation: Increased coordination and synergy in the BSR among
public sector and NGO cooperation initiatives, projects and
stakeholders dealing with bio-economy.
Number of macro-regional public sector, NGO and research and
development projects resulting in the integration of bio-economy
objectives in national-, regional or local action plans.
0
Authorities, research institutions, and organisations in the BSR
countries.
Bio-economy: Development of a sustainable bio-economy in the Baltic
Sea region.
BSR bio-economy initiatives.
0
50 (tbc)
Authorities, research institutions, and organisations in the BSR
countries.
Actions and flagship projects
Work on bio-economy in the BSR could constitute a forum for sharing
experiences and enhancing the discussion on sustainable development at
European and even global level. ‘Engaging with global partners for a
faster advance of research and innovation related to the bio-economy
world-wide will be essential to maximise the sustainable use of
natural resources and to foster positive socio-economic, environmental
and climate change impacts. The world initiative Rio+20 also support
bio-economy activities’.74
The Europe 2020 Strategy calls for a bio-economy as a key element for
smart and green growth in Europe.75
Bio-economy aims to pave the way for a lower emission and more
resource efficient society that combines food production with the
sustainable use of renewable resources for industrial purposes and
environmental protection. The conversion to a bio-based economy means
a transition from an economy that, to a large extent, is based on
fossil fuels, to a more resource-efficient economy based to a higher
extent on renewable raw materials that are produced through the
sustainable use of ecosystem services from land and water.
There is a need to explore how to transform the increased demand of
biomass and bio-based products into sustainable solutions in the
entire value chain from biomass to food, innovative bio-based products
and bioenergy. These challenges link well with the European
Commission’s Strategy and Action Plan on bio-economy.76
The bio-economy approach combines a wide array of sciences (e.g. life
sciences, agronomy, ecology, forestry sciences, marine sciences and
social sciences) and link industrial technologies (e.g. biotechnology,
nanotechnology and information and communication technologies) with
local and tacit knowledge.
With its cross-cutting nature, the bio-economy approach offers a
unique opportunity to address complex and inter-connected challenges,
while at the same time achieving economic growth. Exchanges between
research institutions, public authorities and private businesses
should be strengthened at macro-regional, national and local levels to
further explore how to transform the increased demand on biomass into
sustainable solutions in the entire value chain from biomass to
bio-based products and to the consumer.
The Baltic Sea region has a large concentration of biomass,
well-developed infrastructure, technological and environmental
knowledge and a long tradition for cooperation across the region. This
cooperation should be intensified across national and regional
borders, and across sectors.
This horizontal action will thus link existing projects and activities
within the EUSBSR (e.g. flagship projects) and connected areas (the
action is linked but not limited to on-going activities in e.g.
priority areas ‘Agri’, ‘Energy’, ‘Innovation’ and ‘Bio’), and work
towards identifying and filling eventual gaps, and developing
potentials.
The horizontal action will include 7 overall themes, which we
developed and jointly decided upon among a large group of
stakeholders; researchers, business partners; public and private
organisations and the civil society at the Nordic-Baltic biomass
conference organized by the Nordic Council of Ministers on March 20-21
in 2012:
1.
the central place or a hub for knowledge transfer;
2.
the supply chain;
3.
sustainability of biomass production and its use in a Baltic
perspective;
4.
improvement of cross-border cooperation and removal of trade
barriers;
5.
transport of biofuels and sustainable solutions;
6.
policy and planning tools for land use in relation to biomass
production.
Expected outcomes of the horizontal action are:
*
increased coordination and synergy among initiatives and projects
dealing with sustainable biomass production and use in the Baltic
Sea region;
*
workshops and conferences where the forefront of research,
innovation and technology for biomass production and use is
presented and shared;
*
expert panels, which can help defining future challenges and
possibilities.
Potential flagship projects
A range of projects can be engaged either as external projects,
flagship projects under this horizontal action or through a clustering
of flagship projects under various priority areas. This could include:
*
The Nordic Bio-economy Initiative. The Nordic Bio-economy
Initiative is an on-going and adaptive policy process intended to
ensure policy coherence in activities supporting the development
of the Nordic bio-economy. Lead: NCM. Deadline: 2014.
*
The Baltic Sea Region ‘Bioenergy Promotion II’ project. The
project aims at strengthening the development towards a
sustainable, competitive and territorially integrated Baltic Sea
region in the field of sustainable use of bioenergy. Lead:
Germany. Deadline: for progress review to be determined.
*
Sustainable Forest Management in the Baltic Sea Region – EFINORD
(flagship project under priority area ‘Agri’). Lead: EFINORD.
Deadline: to be determined.
Moreover the following projects could contribute:
*
Solid Biomass Project (with the NCM Working Group on Renewable
Energy (AGFE)).
*
Bio-economy as a driver for sustainable rural development.
*
Capacity building to assess the impact of low-emission actions on
bio-economy development.
*
To develop a specific toolbox to analyse each bio-economy activity
in terms of its influence on environment, economy and social
consequences.
Annex I: Completed Flagship Projects77
======================================
PA1 – To reduce nutrient inputs to the sea to acceptable levels
1.1. Removing phosphates in detergents. The aim of the project was to
give support to the Baltic Sea states to implement HELCOM
recommendation 28E/7, i.e. national legislative action to limit the
use of phosphates in laundry detergents and automatic dishwasher
detergents. This was accomplished by the production of information
material to policy-makers. An EU-wide ban on phosphates in laundry
detergents was adopted in 2011. Final report.
PA3 – Reducing the use and impact of hazardous substances
3.1. Develop tools and indicators for the assessment of biological
effects of anthropogenic chemical stress in the Baltic Sea (BEAST) by
investigating the causality between chemical pressure and biological
effects at different levels of biological organisation. One outcome of
the project was a set of recommendations for monitoring the effects of
hazardous substances in the whole Baltic Sea area. The project
contributed to capacity building and strengthening of network through
workshops (BEAST project financed by the Bonus Joint Baltic Sea
Research and Development Programme). Lead: Finnish Environment
Institute. Finalised: December 2011. Final Report.
3.3. Sustainable management of contaminated sediments (SMOCS)
addressed the problem of sustainable management of contaminated
sediments. The aim of the project was to provide support for dredging
actions all around the Baltic Sea through the development of
guidelines for management of contaminated sediments, including
sustainability assessment practices and decision support regarding the
handling alternatives as well as treatment technologies. A guideline
and a toolbox for treatment technologies, an assessment and decision
support system were developed and field tests to validate and
demonstrate treatment methods under various conditions were performed.
A durable network was created through interaction with key target
groups and a participatory approach to all work packages (SMOCS
project financed by the Baltic Sea Region Programme). Lead: Swedish
Geotechnical Institute. Finalised: December 2012.
3.5. Control of Hazardous Substances in the Baltic Sea Region
(COHIBA). The project studied the sources and inputs of the 11
hazardous substances or substance groups of the HELCOM Baltic Sea
Action Plan (BSAP) and developed recommendations for measures to
reduce these substances. The overall objective of COHIBA was to
support the implementation of the BSAP with regard to hazardous
substances by developing joint actions to reach the goal. The project
was co-financed by the EU Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-2013. Lead:
Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). Finalized: 2012. More
information can be found at http://www.cohiba-project.net/. Final
report.
More information regarding the three abovementioned projects:
http://www.swedishepa.se/en/In-English/Start/EU-and-international-cooperation/Swedish-EPAs-work-in-the-EU/The-Baltic-Sea-Strategy/Priority-area-3/Flagships/
PA4 – Becoming a model region for clean shipping
4.4. Eliminate the discharges of sewage from ships, especially from
passenger ships, by following-up the proposal by HELCOM to the
International Maritime Organization (IMO) to designate the Baltic Sea
as a control area for sewage discharges from passenger ships, whereby
cruise and passenger ships will be required to treat their sewage to
remove nutrients or deliver it to port reception facilities. The
HELCOM member countries led by Finland initiated a process in the IMO
that led to the final adoption at the organization’s Marine
Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) 62nd Meeting in July 2011 of
the Baltic Sea as the first sea in the world designated by IMO as a
Special Area for sewage under MARPOL Annex IV. All passenger ships
operating within the Baltic Sea Special Area will be required to treat
sewage on board, to remove nutrients prior to the discharge into the
sea, or to deliver it to a port reception facility (PRF). It will be
mandatory for new and existing passenger ships to comply with the
anti-discharge regulations by 2016 and 2018 respectively. The Special
Area status will be enforced when the HELCOM countries notify the IMO
that adequate reception facilities for sewage are available in their
passenger ports. Lead: HELCOM. Project can be considered completed at
project level while the formal notification of the adequate reception
facilities for sewage is awaited. More information can be found at
http://www.helcom.fi/shipping/waste/en_GB/waste/.
4.5. Improve the waste handling on board and in ports within the
framework of the Baltic Master II project through better involvement
of different actors, i.e. coastal municipalities and ports together
with national authorities, research institutes, universities and
pan-Baltic organisations and finding practical solutions to improve
waste handling. The Baltic Master II project initiated in January 2009
addressed issues from the local and regional perspective using
cross-border and cross-sectoral collaboration in order to find viable
solutions to global problems. The project brought together actors from
a wide range of levels ranging from local, regional and national
authorities to universities and pan-Baltic organisations. Providing a
link between the local/regional level and the national level was an
important element of the project in order to combine hands-on
knowledge with strategic work. Lead: Region Blekinge, Sweden.
Finalised: January 2012. Final report.
4.6. Conduct a feasibility study on LNG infrastructure for short sea
shipping. Short Sea Shipping needs to be developed as a sustainable
transport alternative encompassing intermodal transport as well as
transport of bulk cargo. With the coming cuts in the allowed sulphur
content in bunker fuel and limitations on emissions of nitrogen
oxides, the competitiveness of short sea shipping is put under great
stress and new technologies must be considered. Engine manufacturers
have started to offer liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an alternative to
oil, but this alternative demands an infrastructure of LNG filling
stations. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a climate- and
environmentally friendly fuel that is to be made competitive through
an effective infrastructure and good framework conditions. This has
been the aim of a major project in which, inter alia, the Scandinavian
countries and several large energy companies participate. The Danish
Maritime Authority was the coordinating partner of the project. The
purpose of the project was to develop recommendations for how to
establish an infrastructure facilitating the use of LNG as a ships’
fuel. However, other important areas have also been identified. The
project’s recommendations concentrate on five main areas: Bunkering of
ships with LNG, Economic and financial conditions, Safety, Technical
and operational conditions and finally Permits for an infrastructure
ashore.78 Lead: Danish Maritime Authority. Finalised: June 2012. Final
report.
PA8 – Implementing the Small Business Act: to promote
entrepreneurship, strengthen SMEs and increase the efficient use of
human resources
8.3. Sustainable Production through Innovation in Small and Medium
sized Enterprises. The project was completed in April 2012. SPIN was a
€3 m project supported by the Baltic Sea Region Programme 2007-2013  of
the European Union. SPIN brought together some of the most important
institutions for eco-innovations in the Baltic Sea region and
was supported by numerous national governments, sector associations,
research bodies and transnational NGOs.
PA11 – To improve internal and external transport links
11.1. Shorter Plane Routes were implemented through the establishment
of ‘Functional Airspace Blocks’ (FAB) in the Baltic Sea region (the
North European FAB, Danish-Swedish FAB and the Baltic FAB (joint
initiative between Poland and Lithuania). Lead: Lithuania. Finalised:
December 2012.
By 4 December 2012 Member States shall take all necessary measures in
order to ensure the implementation of functional airspace blocks with
a view to achieving the required capacity and efficiency of the air
traffic management network within the single European sky and
maintaining a high level of safety and contributing to the overall
performance of the air transport system and a reduced environmental
impact.
Danish-Swedish FAB has been declared established and notified to the
European Commission in 2009.
North European FAB (NEFAB) includes Estonia, Finland, Latvia and
Norway The agreements have been signed and ratified by the states and
documentation are registered at the depository. This means that NEFAB
will be established in accordance with the requirements in December
2012.
11.2. Development of green corridors network implied an effective
implementation of EU regulations, restrictions and incentives which
are designed to tackle so called transport externalities, i. e.
emissions, pollution, noise, accidents and congestion. Projects
emphasized the network of green corridors  Transbaltic, Scandria and
EWTC II were finished on September and December 2012.
Transbaltic was a transnational project which has been granted a
strategic status by the authorities of the EU Baltic Sea Region
Programme 2007-2013. The overall objective of TransBaltic was to
provide regional level incentives for the creation of a comprehensive
multimodal transport system in the BSR. This was achieved by means of
joint transport development measures and jointly implemented business
concepts. Final report.
Scandria project has been performed as a cooperation of 19 partners
from Germany and Scandinavia, willing to assume a future role in
developing a green and innovative transport corridor between the
Baltic and the Adriatic Sea, as well as to promote a new European
economic core area. The project has been organized in three thematic
pillars: Transport infrastructure, Innovative logics, Development of a
strategic corridor. The project arranged its Final Conference in June
2012. Final report.
EWTC II Through international cooperation, the aim of the project was
to develop and work for efficient, safe and environmen­tally friendly
handling of the increasing amount of goods going east-west in the
south Baltic region. The project aimed to prepare stakeholders in the
region to enhance sustainable transport planning and smart IT
solutions in the field of transport. This in combination with business
development in the transport sector has to stimulate the economic
growth in the entire East West TC. Final report.
PA12 – To maintain and reinforce attractiveness of the Baltic Sea
Region in particular through education and youth, tourism, culture and
health
12.12. Health: Improvement of public health – by promotion of
equitably distributed high quality primary health care systems – a
project aimed at helping increase cost-efficiency of the public health
system and more efficiently counteracting communicable diseases as
well as health problems related to social factors. Lead: the Northern
Dimension Partnership in Public Health and Social Well-being (NDPHS)
and the Blekinge Centre of Competence, Blekinge County Council.
Finalised: December 2012. Final report not available yet. More
information: www.ltblekinge.se/imprim.
12.13. Health: ICT for Health. Strengthening social capacities for the
utilisation of eHealth technologies in the framework of the ageing
population. The Interreg IV B project ‘ICT for Health’ has been
managed within the eHealth for Regions network and aimed at
contributing to a better deployment of eHealth technologies through
enhancing the social capacity, acceptance and knowledge of citizens
and medical professionals. It addressed some of the key challenges of
the Baltic Sea region, namely demographic changes and the large
differences with regard to access to, and quality of, health services.
Lead: University of Applied Sciences, Flensburg. Finalised: December
2012. Final report not available yet. More information:
www.ictforhealth.net or www.ehealthacceptance2012.net.
12.2. Education: BSR-Quick. The project BSR – Quick aimed at
qualification for owners, graduates and employees of small and medium
sized enterprises. The project encompassed academic education (dual
bachelor study courses) and vocational training. By creating a network
of universities the missing link between SMEs and the academic area
has been bridged. In addition to education and training the project
delivered innovative solutions for individual companies. Lead: Hanse
Parlament e.V. Hamburg, Germany, with 40 partners from all BSR
countries including Business Organisations, Universities and
Ploytechnics, Public Adminstrations. Finalised: December 2012. Final
report.
12.3. Education: Identify barriers hampering mobility of researchers
and students in the BSR and enhance cooperation in the region in the
area of mobility. It has produced a report describing barriers of
mobility. A conference in cooperation with the BDF and the Nordic
Council of Ministers has been organized, with the delivery of
recommendations. The topic of learning mobility is of major importance
at European level, but it should be addressed within the future
flagship projects as a tool for increasing cooperation and
qualification. Lead: Denmark, Lithuania and Germany. Finalised:
December 2010.
PA13 – To become a leading region in maritime safety and in security
13.1. Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities. The project involved
national ‘coast guard-like’ services in EU Member States and third
countries, in the context of maritime safety, maritime security, and
pollution prevention and response in the Baltic Sea. Lead: Finnish
Border Guard. Finalised: 31 December 2011. Final report
13.2. Become a pilot region for the integration of maritime
surveillance systems. The overall objective of this Maritime Policy
pilot project and preparatory action was to develop and test
mechanisms for improving maritime awareness by sharing operational
information between government departments and agencies responsible
for monitoring activities at sea of all Baltic Sea countries. One
specific goal was the development of technical interfaces that
securely allow for all countries to join in a common situational image
containing restricted law enforcement and other information. (Maritime
Surveillance North (MARSUNO) project. Lead: Swedish Coast Guard.
Finalised: 31 December 2011. Final report.
13.4. Become a pilot region for e-Navigation by establishing one or
more e-Navigation trial zones, in view of the gradual achievement of
an integrated network of e-Navigation systems for European coastal
waters and the high seas (Efficient, Safe and Sustainable Traffic at
Sea (EfficienSea) project. Lead: Danish Maritime Authority. Finalised:
January 2012. Final report.
PA14 – To reinforce maritime accident response capacity protection
from major emergencies
14.2. Map existing marine pollution response capacities and make
sub-regional plans for cross-border response cooperation, based on
assessment of the integrated risk of shipping accidents. (BRISK
project, financed by the ‘Baltic Sea Region’ transnational programme,
which is a part of the ‘Territorial Cooperation’ objective). The
overall aim of the three year project was to increase the preparedness
of all Baltic Sea countries to respond to major spills of oil and
hazardous substances from shipping and enhance sub-regional
cooperation. The project resulted in a risk assessment of shipping
accidents, mapping environmental sensitivity to pollution and new bi-
and multilateral agreements on response to pollution at sea. The
project was implemented under the HELCOM Response Group and in
cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers (information office
in Kaliningrad). Lead: Admiral Danish Fleet HQ. Finalised: in April
2012. More information can be found at http://www.brisk.helcom.fi/.
Final report.
PA15 – To decrease the volume of, and harm done by, cross border crime
15.1. Conduct a threat assessment for the Baltic Sea Region, in line
with the Organised Crime Threat Assessment methodology, concerning
organised crime and border security, and longer term threat assessment
of critical infrastructure. Lead: Europol in cooperation with BSTF and
Baltic Sea Regional Border Control Cooperation and FRONTEX as concerns
external borders (coordinated by Finland). Finalised: December 2010.
Due to security reasons the report cannot be available to the public.
15.2. Create a single national coordination centre in each Member
State, which coordinates 24/7 the activities of all national
authorities carrying out external border control tasks (detection,
identification, tracking and interception) and which is able to
exchange information with the centres in other Member States and with
FRONTEX. Create one single national border surveillance system, which
integrates surveillance and enables the dissemination of information
24/7 between all authorities involved in external border control
activities at all or – based on risk analysis – selected parts of the
external border. (EUROSUR phase 1). This flagship project is linked
and has already ended with priority area 13 (‘To become a leading
region in maritime safety and in security’) and especially in its
Maritime surveillance and Law Enforcement Flagship Projects 13.1.
‘Baltic Sea Maritime Functionalities Project – BSMF’ and 13.2 ‘Become
a pilot region for the integration of maritime surveillance systems –
MARSUNO’. Lead: Finland. Finalised: December 2012.
15.4. Pool resources for the posting of liaison officers to third
countries and international organisations in order to fight serious
forms of cross border crime, such as drugs trafficking, inter-alia by
considering to develop further the existing Council Decision on the
common use of liaison officers posted abroad by the law enforcement
agencies of the Member States within the Baltic Sea region. Lead:
Finland. Finalised: December 2010. The report is not available to the
public.
Annex II: Charting how Priority Areas and Horizontal Actions address
each Objective
====================================================================
 
PA Nutri
PA Hazards
PA Bio
PA Agri
PA Ship
PA Safe
PA Secure
PA Transport
PA Energy
PA Tourism
PA Culture
PA Crime
PA Market
PA Innovation
PA SME
PA Health
PA Education
HA Spatial
HA Neighbours
HA Involve
HA Sustainable
HA Promo
Objective 1: Save the Sea


Clear Water







Rich and healthy wildlife







Clean and safe shipping





Better cooperation













Objective 2: Connect the Region


Good transport





Reliable energy markets



Connecting people











Better cooperation in cross-border crime and trafficking


Objective 3: Increase Prosperity


Single market




Europe 2020


















Global competitiveness
















Climate change










✔ Dark check - the PA or HA primarily addresses this sub-objective
✔ Light check - the PA also addresses these sub-objectives, though not
as directly
1 European Council Conclusions of 14 December 2007, point 59: ‘Without
prejudice to the integrated maritime policy, the European Council
invites the Commission to present an EU strategy for the Baltic Sea
region at the latest by June 2009.This strategy should inter alia help
to address the urgent environmental challenges related to the Baltic
Sea. The Northern Dimension framework provides the basis for the
external aspects of cooperation in the Baltic Sea region’.
2
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/communic/baltic/com_baltic_en.pdf.
3
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/cooperate/baltic/pdf/council_concl_30102009.pdf.
4
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/official/communic/baltic/com_baltic_2012_en.pdf.
5
http://www.consilium.europa.eu/uedocs/cms_Data/docs/pressdata/EN/genaff/131228.pdf.
6 Common set of roadmaps between the EU and Russia. There are 4 common
spaces: Common economic space, Common space of freedom, security and
justice, Common space of external security, Common space of research
and education, including cultural aspects.
7 For an extended discussion of the role of integrated governance in
the Baltic Sea region, see WWF Baltic Ecoregion Programme, Counter
Currents: Scenarios for the Baltic Sea, WWF 2012.
8 By the Member State is meant the national administration. It is
strongly preferred that a national policy coordination is led by the
Prime Minister’s office or the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure
coherent development and implementation of the EUSBSR among the
involved institutions.
9 The Member States are appointing priority area focal points (line
ministries, agencies, other national/regional institutions) for each
priority area of the EUSBSR. See tasks of the priority area focal
points.
10 If there is a priority area coordinator/horizontal action leader
appointed in the Member State for the particular priority
area/horizontal action, no priority area focal point/horizontal action
focal point is required.
11 For this purpose, a steering committee/coordination group should be
set-up and chaired by the priority area coordinator(s). A group should
be composed of representatives of all Member States and other Baltic
Sea region states, when relevant, as well as experts in the area
concerned. It’s up to members of group to decide on internal rules of
the steering committee. The group should meet at least twice a year
and support priority area coordinator(s) in implementation of the
tasks referred.
12 For this purpose, a steering committee/coordination group should be
set-up and chaired by the horizontal action leader(s). A group should
be composed of representatives of all Member States and other Baltic
Sea region states, when relevant, as well as experts in the area
concerned. It’s up to members of group to decide on internal rules of
the steering committee. The group should meet at least twice a year
and support horizontal action leader(s) in implementation of the tasks
referred.
13 A body in charge of the implementation of a programme/ financial
instrument is the institution or the authority (at international,
national, regional or local level) responsible for the management and
implementation of the respective programme or financial instrument.
14 Under exceptional circumstances projects with less than three
countries involved could be considered.
15 BONUS 2010-2016. The Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development
Programme. http://www.bonusportal.org/bonus_2010-2016.
16 Council Conclusions on the review of the European Union Strategy
for the Baltic Sea Region, 15 November 2011.
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/cooperate/baltic/pdf/council_conclusions_eusbsr_15112011.pdf.
17 Eutrophication is defined here as the enrichment of water by
nutrients, especially compounds of nitrogen and/or phosphorous,
causing an accelerated growth of algae and other forms of plant life
to produce an undesirable disturbance to the balance of organisms
present in the water and to the quality of the water concerned.
18 WWF (2012). Counter Currents: Scenarios for the Baltic Sea 2030.
19 Commission Communication on Blue Growth opportunities for marine
and maritime sustainable growth of 13 September 2012 (COM(2012) 494
final.
20 Decision 862/2010/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council
on the participation of the Union in a Joint Baltic Sea Research and
Development Programme (BONUS) published in the Official Journal on
30.9.2010 (OJ L 256).
21 Towards an ecologically coherent network of well-managed Marine
Protected Areas – Implementation report on the status and ecological
coherence of the HELCOM BSPA network (2010), BSEP 124B:
http://www.helcom.fi/stc/files/Publications/Proceedings/bsep124B.pdf.
22 Salmon and Sea Trout Populations and Rivers in the Baltic Sea –
HELCOM assessment of salmon (Salmo salar) and sea trout (Salmo trutta)
populations and habitats in rivers flowing to the Baltic Sea BSEP 126
A, country-wise reports.
23 Ibid.
24 List of original salmon populations with low or impaired
reproduction (traffic light lists; see above - BSEP 126 A, p. 57 and
country-wise reports).
25 Council Directive 79/409/EEC of 2 April 1979 on the conservation of
wild birds.
26 Council Directive 92/43/EEC of 21 May 1992 on the conservation of
natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora.
27 Council Regulation (EC) No 812/2004 adopted in April 2004 laying
down measures concerning incidental catches of cetaceans in fisheries
and amending Regulation (EC) No 88/98.
28 OSPAR is the organisation established by the Convention for the
protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, to
which 15 countries and the European Union are Contracting Parties.
29 http://www.marsuno.eu managed under the EUSBSR priority area
‘Safe’, coordinated by: Denmark and Finland; the proposed potential
flagship project.
30 Call for proposals MARE/2012/17.
31 DG ENTR SEC-2013.3.5.3-2 Testing the interoperability of Maritime
Surveillance systems – Pre-Operation Validation.
32 BASREC (initiated in 1999) includes the Governments of Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland,
Russia and Sweden. The European Commission is represented by DG
Transport and Energy. The participation in this work also involves the
Council of Baltic Sea States (CBSS) and the Nordic Council of
Ministers (NCM).
33 NORDEL was the collaboration organisation of the Transmission
System Operators (TSOs) of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and
Sweden. Their mission was to promote the establishment of a seamless
Nordic electricity market. NORDEL was rounded up 1 July 2009 and all
operational tasks were transformed to ENTSO-E.
34 The NDPHS Strategy on Health at Work aims to help ensure good
social and work environments and prevent lifestyle-related
non-communicable diseases using the workplace as an effective arena
for promoting a healthy lifestyle.
35 A joint project for the European research area. ESS Scandinavia is
a consortium working to ensure ESS will be built in Lund. The
consortium consists of all the universities and colleges in the
Öresund region, a number of other leading universities and research
institutes in Scandinavia as well as Region Skåne, Lund Municipality,
Copenhagen Capacity and the Öresund Committee.
36 http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/score/docs/score18_en.pdf.
37 According to 2006 Eurobarometers,
http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/strategy/index_en.htm#061204.
38
http://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:27849-2012:TEXT:EN:HTML&tabId=1.
39 Willing to participate: DK, EE. SE, FI – focusing on certain
sectors.
40 Willing to participate: DK, EE. DE – only as regards PCP.
41 Bo G. Gustafsson et al. 2012, Reconstructing the Development of
Baltic Sea Eutrophication 1850–2006, Ambio 41:534–548.
42 Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and Council of 23
October 2000 establishing a framework for Community action in the
field of water policy.
43 Council Directive 91/676/1991 of 12 December 1991 concerning the
protection of waters against pollution caused by nitrates from
agricultural sources.
44 Council Directive 91/271/EEC of 21 May 1991 concerning urban
waste-water treatment.
45 Council Directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and of the
Council of 24 November 2010 on industrial emissions (integrated
pollution prevention and control).
46 Directive 2008/56/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council
of 17 June 2008 establishing a framework for community action in the
field of marine environmental policy.
47 Source: HELCOM.
48 Source: Finnish Environment Institute/VTT Technical Research Centre
of Finland.
49 Source: HELCOM.
50 The Helsinki Convention is signed and ratified by Denmark, Estonia,
Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Sweden, the Russian
Federation and the European Union.
51 In the framework of HELCOM Response and the CleanSeaNet initiative,
in accordance with directive 2005/35.
52 Lead will be identified following a workshop in November 2012
organised by the CBSS Secretariat and MSB.
53 MARPOL is an International Convention for the Prevention of
Pollution from Ships adopted in 1973 and modified by the Protocol of
1978.
54 http://www.helcom.fi/BSAP/en_GB/intro/.
55 http://www.baltic.org/projects/bsr_innoship/.
56 As decided by the HELCOM Moscow Ministerial in 2010, cf.
http://www.helcom.fi/stc/files/Moscow2010/HELCOM%20Moscow%20Ministerial%20Declaration%20FINAL.pdf.
57 www.yepat.info.
58 AGORA 2.0 compiles tools and information concerning sustainable
tourism and makes them accessible for interested users. The source for
this information are partners representing all three dimensions of
sustainability, different levels of administration and tourism
management and different thematic interests, projects, actors and
stakeholders of tourism www.agora2-tourism.net.
59 The definition of ‘green corridor’ will be elaborated to facilitate
the EUSBSR monitoring process.
60 Motorways of the Sea are the maritime dimension of the TEN-T
network. They exist or they are new sea-based transport services that
are integrated in door-to-door logistic chains and concentrate flows
of freight on viable, regular, frequent, high-quality and reliable
Short Sea Shipping links. The deployment of the Motorways of the Sea
network should absorb a significant part of the expected increase in
road freight traffic, improve the accessibility of peripheral and
island regions and states and reduce road congestion.
61 Agency for Support of Cultural Initiatives Tranzit –
Kaliningrad-based NGO in cultural management, cultural policy and
creative industries, since 2002, director Yulia Bardoun, web-site
http://www.tranzit-kaliningrad.ru/en/.
62 See e.g. WWF Baltic Ecoregion Programme, Future Trends in the
Baltic Sea, WWF 2010.
63 VASAB – Vision and Strategies around the Baltic Sea – is an
intergovernmental network of 11 countries of the Baltic Sea region
promoting cooperation on spatial planning and development in the
Baltic Sea region.
64 Adopted by the Ministers responsible for spatial, planning and
development of Baltic Sea region countries in October 2009 in Vilnius.
65 2012, UN Rio+20 outcome document ‘The future we want’
http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/futurewewant.html.
66 Projections made in 2007 showed a EU primary energy consumption in
2020 of 1842 Mtoe. (Directive on energy efficiency, repealing
Directives 2004/8/EC and 2006/32/EC and amending Directive
2009/125/EC).
67 As established in the Commission’s Decision determining Member
States' annual emission allocations.
68 Each Member State shall set an indicative national energy
efficiency target, based on either primary or final energy
consumption, primary or final energy savings, or energy intensity. A
20% reduction would result in 1474 Mtoe in 2020, i.e. a reduction of
368 Mtoe as compared to projections.
69 UNEP 2011, ‘Towards a Green Economy: Pathways to Sustainable
Development and poverty eradication – a synthesis for policy makers‘.
www.unep.org/greeneconomy.
70 The listed potential projects are preliminary ideas and should be
further discussed and decided by the CBSS Expert group on Sustainable
Development – Baltic 21.
71 The listed potential projects are preliminary ideas and should be
further discussed and decided by the CBSS Expert group on Sustainable
Development – Baltic 21.
72 2012, UN Rio+20 outcome document ‘The future we want’
http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/futurewewant.html.
73 European Commission’s staff working document accompanying the
document ‘Innovation for Sustainable Growth: A Bio-economy for
Europe’, COM(2012) 60 final.
74 European Commission’s staff working document accompanying the
document ‘Innovation for Sustainable Growth: A Bio economy for
Europe’, COM(2012) 60 final.
75 Europe 2020 Strategy flagship initiative ‘A resource-efficient
Europe’: http://ec.europa.eu/resource-efficient-europe/index_en.htm.
76 Communication from the European Commission; Innovation for
Sustainable Growth: A Bio economy for Europe, COM(2012) 60 final.
77 The flagship projects have been listed according to the priority
areas adopted in January 2012.
78 Final report available at
www.dma.dk/themes/LNGinfrastructureproject/Sider/LNGinfrastructureproject.aspx.
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