1 Tool For Development Of A Food Safety Program

1 Tool For Development Of A Food Safety Program

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1.
Tool for development of a food safety program
Private hospitals
April 2018
Tool for development of a food safety program – Private hospitals
Published by the State of Queensland (Queensland Health), September
2015

This document is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
Australia licence. To view a copy of this licence, visit
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au
© State of Queensland (Queensland Health) 2015
You are free to copy, communicate and adapt the work, as long as you
attribute the State of Queensland (Queensland Health).
For more information contact:
Food Safety Standards and Regulation, Department of Health, GPO Box
48, Brisbane QLD 4001, email [email protected], phone (07)
3328 9310.
An electronic version of this document is available at
www.health.qld.gov.au
Disclaimer:
The content presented in this publication is distributed by the
Queensland Government as an information source only. The State of
Queensland makes no statements, representations or warranties about
the accuracy, completeness or reliability of any information contained
in this publication. The State of Queensland disclaims all
responsibility and all liability (including without limitation for
liability in negligence) for all expenses, losses, damages and costs
you might incur as a result of the information being inaccurate or
incomplete in any way, and for any reason reliance was placed on such
information.
Contents
========
Introduction 7
What is the purpose of this document? 7
What is a food safety program? 7
Why develop a food safety program? 7
How do I develop a food safety program? 8
What about existing documentation? 8
How do I have my food safety program accredited? 8
What services are provided by local government? 9
Overview of accreditation process 9
9
1. Business details 10
2. Identifying food handling activities 11
3. Food handling activities 12
Activity 1 - Purchasing 13
Please keep the following records for this activity: 13
Activity 2 – Receiving 14
Hazards 14
Controls and monitoring 14
Corrective actions 15
Please keep the following records for this activity: 15
For off-site events: 15
Please refer to the following support programs: 15
Activity 3 – Dry storage 16
Hazards 16
Controls and monitoring 16
Corrective actions 17
Please keep the following records for this activity: 17
For off-site events: 17
Please refer to the following support programs: 17
Activity 4 – Cold storage 18
Hazard 18
Controls and monitoring 18
Corrective actions 19
Please keep the following records for this activity: 19
For off-site events: 19
Please refer to the following support programs: 19
Activity 5 – Frozen storage 20
Hazards 20
Controls and monitoring 20
Corrective actions 20
Please keep the following records for this activity: 21
For off-site events: 21
Please refer to the following support programs: 21
Activity 6 - Thawing 22
Hazards 22
Controls and monitoring 22
Corrective actions 23
Please keep the following records for this activity: 23
For off-site events: 23
Please refer to the following support programs: 23
Activity 7 - Preparation 24
Hazards 24
Controls and monitoring 24
Corrective actions 25
Please keep the following records for this activity: 26
For off-site events: 26
Please refer to the following support programs: 26
Activity 8 - Cooking 27
Hazards 27
Controls and monitoring 27
Corrective actions 27
Please keep the following records for this activity: 27
For off-site events: 27
Please refer to the following support programs: 28
Activity 9 – Cooling food 29
Hazards 29
Controls and monitoring 29
Corrective actions 30
Please keep the following records for this activity: 30
For off-site events: 30
Please refer to the following support programs: 30
Activity 10 – Reheating and hot holding 31
Hazards 31
Controls and monitoring 31
Corrective actions 32
Please keep the following records for this activity: 32
For off-site events: 32
Please refer to the following support programs: 32
Activity 11 – Serving, self-serve and displaying food 33
Hazards 33
Controls and monitoring 33
Corrective actions 34
Please keep the following records for this activity: 34
For off-site events: 34
Please refer to the following support programs: 34
Activity 12 – Allergens, food packaging and labelling 34
Hazards 35
Controls and monitoring 35
Corrective actions 36
Please keep the following records for this activity: 36
For off-site events: 36
Please refer to the following support programs: 37
Activity 13 – Transporting food 38
Hazards 38
Controls and monitoring 38
Corrective actions 38
Please keep the following records for this activity: 39
For off-site events: 39
Please refer to the following support programs: 39
Activity 14 – Off-site events 40
Hazards 40
Controls and monitoring 40
Corrective actions 41
Please keep the following records for this activity: 41
Support program 1 – Food premises and equipment 42
Water supply 42
Sewage and waste water disposal 42
Storage of waste and recyclable matter 42
Ventilation 42
Lighting 42
Floors, walls and ceilings 43
Fixtures, fittings and equipment 43
Storage facilities 44
Toilet facilities 44
Food transport vehicles 44
Maintenance 44
Calibrating thermometers 44
Ice point calibration 45
Boiling point calibration 45
Mechanical calibration 45
Support program 2 – Cleaning and Sanitising 46
What is cleaning? 46
What is sanitising? 46
What needs to be cleaned and sanitised? 46
Planning for cleaning 47
Cleaning procedures and records 47
What does a cleaning procedure and record look like? 47
Six steps to proper cleaning 48
How to sanitise 48
Support program 3 – Personal hygiene and health of food handlers 49
What about personal hygiene? 49
Hand washing 49
How should food handlers wash their hands? 49
The health of food handlers 50
Support program 4 – Temperature control 51
The use of time as a control for ready to eat potentially hazardous
food 51
Use of time as a control for cooked and cooled potentially hazardous
foods 52
Use of time as a control for food that has been cooked by another
business 52
Support program 5 – Pest control 53
What is a pest? 53
Preventing pests 53
How often do I need to spray? 53
Support program 6 – Waste management 54
Storage of garbage and recyclable matter 54
Support program 7 – Product recall schedule 55
Support program 8 – Customer complaints 56
Support program 9 – Skills and knowledge 57
Staff responsibilities 57
Food handler skills and knowledge 57
Strategies to ensure food handlers have the skills and knowledge
required 57
Examples of skills and knowledge required: 58
Support program 10 – Staff training 59
Examples: 59
Checklists 60
Food handler skills and knowledge checklist 60
Legal obligations 60
Keeping your program current 62
Amendment worksheet 62
Are you ready to be audited? 63
Audit readiness checklist 63
Frequently asked questions 64
Record 1 – Approved suppliers list 67
Record 2 – Approved food supplier agreement form 68
General requirements for the products: 68
Package and labelling requirements: 68
Transport requirements: 68
Conditions for supply: 68
Suppliers’ acceptance: 68
Business acceptance: 68
Record 3 – Incoming goods 69
Time 69
Date 69
Supplier No. 69
Product 69
Temp °C 69
Visual check 69
Accepted/ 69
Rejected 69
Designated storage area 69
Corrective action 69
Checked by 69
Corrective Action – Reject food that does not pass the visual check or
is not delivered at the required temperature 69
Record 4 – Food recall 70
Supplier/Manufacturer 70
Reason for recall 70
Product 70
Batch code 70
Use by date 70
No. of units in stock 70
Corrective action 70
Checked by 70
Record 5 – Customer complaints 71
Record 6 – Temperature control log 72
Record 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide 73
Record 8 – Cleaning and sanitising 74
Record 10 – Pest control 77
Record 12 – Staff training 79
Appendix 1 Local government contact details 89
Useful Resources 90
Introduction
What is the purpose of this document?
-------------------------------------
This document is a food safety program development tool. It is
provided to assist catering and retail premises’ to develop and
implement a customised food safety program. Developing a food safety
program is compulsory for a licensed food business if under the
licence:
a.
the food business involves off-site catering; or
b.
the primary activity of the food business is on-site catering at
the premises stated in the licence; or
c.
the primary activity of the food business is on-site catering at
part of the premises stated in the licence.
Example of part of a premises stated in a licence includes a function
room used for on-site catering and situated on the premises of a large
hotel.
What is a food safety program?
------------------------------
A food safety program is a documented program that identifies and
controls food safety hazards in the handling of food in a food
business.
A food safety program must be retained at the premises of the food
business and must:
*
systematically identify the food safety hazards that are
reasonably likely to occur in food handling operations of the food
business; and
*
identify where, in a food handling operation of the food business,
each hazard identified can be controlled and the means of control;
and
*
provide for the systematic monitoring of the means of control; and
*
provide for appropriate corrective action to be taken when a
hazard identified, is not under control; and
*
provide for the regular review of the program to ensure it is
appropriate for the food business; and
*
provide for the keeping of appropriate records for the food
business, including records about action taken to ensure the
business is carried on in compliance with the program; and
*
contain other information, relating to the control of food safety
hazards, prescribed under a regulation.
Why develop a food safety program?
----------------------------------
The introduction of food safety programs for certain sectors of the
food industry is part of the national food reform process, which aims
to reduce the incidence of food borne illness and reduce the
regulatory burden on the food industry.
The National Risk Validation Report was undertaken in 2002 to
identify:
*
the incidence of food-borne illness attributed to various food
industry sectors;
*
the most cost effective method to reduce the incidence of food
borne illness; and
*
the overall cost benefit of implementing food safety programs.
The report identified food service in catering operations, as one of
five high risk industry sectors in which food safety programs would
reduce the incidence of food-borne illness.
How do I develop a food safety program?
---------------------------------------
This Food Safety Program Tool is a practical step-by-step guide to
help you develop a food safety program that is tailored to your food
premises. Food safety programs do not need to be developed by food
safety auditors or external contractors. This development tool
provides sufficient information and resources to assist catering and
retail operations to develop their own food safety program. However,
you are able to use any development tool for the creation of your food
safety program provided it meets the necessary standard outlined
above.
What about existing documentation?
----------------------------------
It is recognised that some catering and retail operations have been
following either formal or informal food safety programs to varying
degrees for some time. It is not the intention of this process to
replace existing documentation.
Catering and retail operations are encouraged to compare their
existing documents with the requirements noted above. If existing
documents are suitable, they may continue to be used. You may also
alter existing documents to meet the new requirements. This will mean
less work in developing your food safety program and less change in
staff procedures.
In addition, where the food safety program requires information that
is already managed in another section of your premises, there is no
need to duplicate it. For example, if you need to develop a list of
staff and their food handling duties, you can reference existing job
or position descriptions, work orders or other similar documents.
How do I have my food safety program accredited?
------------------------------------------------
Once completed, the food safety program will need to be assessed to
ensure all risks and hazards associated with the operation of the food
business, have been identified and assigned specific monitoring and
control measures. Catering and retail premises can arrange
accreditation by their local government. Relevant contact details are
listed in Appendix 1 of this document.
Accreditation of a food safety program is a one-off process.
Re-accreditation will only be required if the food safety program is
amended to include a major process change. Discuss the requirements of
amending an accredited food safety program with your local government.
Your food safety program will also be subject to periodic audits by
the local government or an approved auditor, to ensure that compliance
with the food safety program is being maintained.
What services are provided by local government?
-----------------------------------------------
Local government are required to consider applications for
accreditation of food safety programs for activities licensed within
their jurisdiction. Local government may also offer other services
which may be subject to fees and charges including:
*
audits of facilities required to implement a food safety program;
*
amendment to an accredited food safety program;
*
inspection of facilities not required to implement a food safety
program;
*
provision of general food safety advice; and
*
provision of design and fit-out advice.
Overview of accreditation process
=================================

=======
1.
Business details
================
Trading name of licensed food business
Company name of licensed food business
Address of food business
Postal address
Telephone
Email
Name of the local government for the area the food business is located
Name of Licensee
Name of food safety supervisor
Food safety supervisors contact phone number
How many meals do you serve per day on average?
Do you undertake on-site catering?
Yes No
Do you undertake off-site catering?
Yes No
Do you deliver meals off-site or provide meals to another
organisation?
Yes No
I (the applicant or licensee) declare that the above premises will
adhere to this food safety program and all its components.
Signed Date
2.
Identifying food handling activities
====================================
This section is used to systematically identify all the food handling
activities that are undertaken in your premises. It is not important
what name you give an activity, as long as it is identified. They are
a means of identifying all of the handling steps involved from
ordering raw materials to final service of the food.
You may be able to identify your activities using the process flow
chart provided as a guide. If the process flow chart provided does not
identify all the activities of your premises, you should modify the
chart as required. If you are not familiar with developing flow
charts, you can simply make a list of all the steps in a process.
After considering the example below, identify the food handling
activities that you undertake in your premises. Please note that this
is an example only and may not reflect the steps you undertake in your
premises.

3.
Food handling activities
========================
Complete the food handling activities form by answering the following
questions. Identifying these activities will assist you with which
components of the food safety program are relevant to your business.
Make a photocopy of this form before completion and add it to your
food safety program.
Food handling activity questions
No
Yes
Use/Retain
Purchase and receiving
Do you purchase food from another business?
Is food delivered from another business?
Do you collect goods from other businesses and transport them to your
food business
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 13
Storage of food
Do you store dry food?
Do you store cold food?
Do you store frozen food?
Activity 3
Activity 4
Activity 5
Thawing
Do you thaw food prior to preparation or cooking?
Activity 6
Preparation
Do you prepare food before serving or sale?
Do you prepare food prior to cooking
Activity 7
Activity 7
Cooking
Do you cook foods at your premises
Activity 8
Cooling
Do you cool foods after cooking?
Activity 9
Reheating and hot holding food
Do you reheat pre-cooked foods?
Do you have food in hot holding equipment?
Activity 10
Activity 10
Serving food
Do you serve food to customers
Activity 11
Self-service
Is self-service of food available
Activity 11
Allergens, packing and labelling
Do you prepare foods containing allergens?
Do you pack or re-package food prior to sale?
Activity 12
Activity 12
Transport
Do you transport food from your business to customers?
Activity 13
Off-site activities
Does your business provide a catering service to your customers at a
premise that is not your principle place of business?
Activity 14
Activity 1 - Purchasing
=======================
Managing the food that you bring into your food business is the first
step in ensuring the food that you produce is safe and suitable.
You may purchase your food by actively going to a store or supplier
and selecting and transporting the food yourself. If you do this, you
also need to refer to Activity 13 – Transporting food.
Alternatively, you may have suppliers deliver food directly to your
food business. A list of approved suppliers provides the food business
with a central point for managing the ordering and delivery of food.
The list represents suppliers you have contracted to provide certain
foods meeting specific criteria.
By maintaining this list, any issues relating to delivery and food
quality can be addressed from a single point. It also allows orders
and enquiries to be made by staff if the responsible person is
unavailable.
Complete the Approved food suppliers list in the development tool,
detailing the name, address and contact numbers of the supplier, along
with a description of the products provided.
You may wish to have a signed agreement with your supplier, which
documents specific criteria that the supplier needs to meet. See
Record No.2 as an example.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 1 – Approved food suppliers list
Record No. 2 – Approved food supplier agreement form
Activity 2 – Receiving
======================
Food businesses must take all practicable measures to ensure they only
receive food that is safe and suitable for human consumption. This
means that they must make sure that the food they receive:
1.
Is protected from contamination.
*
check that food is covered or packaged when it arrives and that
the packaging or covering is not damaged.
*
check the ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ date – if the ‘use by’ date
has past the food may have spoilt. Food cannot be used or sold
past its ‘use by’ date.
*
make sure someone is at the place of delivery to inspect the food
when it arrives and to place it directly into the freezer,
refrigerator or other appropriate storage area.
1.
Can be identified while it is on the premises.
*
although most, if not all of the food you buy will be labelled
with the name of the product and the name and address of the
manufacturer, importer or packager of the food, you may also have
unpackaged or unlabelled food on your premises and will need other
ways of proving what this food is and where it came from.
*
to do this you may want to use your supplier invoices, or keep
some other record of your suppliers and what you buy from them and
the food you have on your premises.
3.
Is it at the correct temperature when it arrives, if it
is potentially hazardous.
*
if it is chilled – at a temperature of 5°C or below;
*
if it is hot – at a temperature of 60°C or above;
*
if it is frozen – frozen hard and not partly thawed;
Hazards
-------
*
potentially hazardous foods delivered, purchased or transported at
temperatures between 5°C and 60°C can allow the growth of
pathogenic (disease causing) bacteria or the formation of toxins;
*
damaged packaging can allow pests and other contaminants into
food;
*
bacteria can multiply in old stock and products that have past
their ‘best before’ and ‘use by date’;
*
pests can carry disease and insects can eat or lay their eggs in
food;
*
foods that are stored near chemicals during transport can become
contaminated and affect the safety of the food.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
Only purchase goods from approved suppliers on the Approved food
suppliers list. Suppliers should also read and sign the Approved food
supplier agreement form.
An employee of the business needs to be present when the goods are
delivered to carry out the following checks:
*
check that the temperature of potentially hazardous foods received
from all suppliers is 5°C or below for cold food and 60°C or above
for hot food;
*
check that frozen food is received frozen hard (not partially
thawed);
*
check that packaging isn’t damaged and that food has no immediate
signs of contamination;
*
check that all products are within their ‘best before’ or ‘use by’
date;
*
check that all products are properly labelled with the name and
address of the manufacturer and a batch code or a date code. A
label will help you identify the food in case it is recalled;
*
ensure all deliveries are placed into designated storage areas
immediately;
*
ensure that when purchasing and transporting food directly (from a
supplier to your business) that all the above checks are conducted
and that you have referred to Activity 13
*
Transporting Food.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
reject potentially hazardous foods which are delivered having
internal temperatures between 5°C and 60°C (unless the supplier
can demonstrate that the time period at which the food has been
between 5°C and 60°C will not compromise the safety of the food).
Refer to Support Program 4 - Temperature control;
*
reject products in damaged packaging;
*
reject goods that are incorrectly labelled i.e. no name and
address of the supplier, use by/best before date or batch code as
a minimum (un-packaged food is exempt);
*
reject deliveries if the inside of the delivery vehicle is unclean
or is carrying chemicals or other matter that may contaminate
food;
*
reject suppliers that do not provide food in the agreed manner.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 1 – Approved food suppliers list
Record No. 2 – Approved food supplier agreement form
Record No. 3 – Incoming goods
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 5 – Pest control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 3 – Dry storage
========================
Food must be stored in an appropriate environment to protect it from
contamination and to maintain the safety and suitability of the food.
Contamination can be the result of pests (cockroaches, rats, flies,
weevils etc); cleaning chemicals stored above or next to foods; or
from excessive humidity.
Food in dry storage areas also needs to be rotated by applying the
principle of first in first out. This ensures that you are not left
with old supplies of food at the back of shelves or cupboards.
Examples of dry products include cereals, flour, rice and canned
products.
Hazards
-------
*
insects and animal pests can contaminate food;
*
pests breed in unclean and overcrowded storage areas;
*
bacteria can multiply in old stock and products that have past
their ‘best before’ and ‘use by’ date;
*
damaged packaging can allow pests and other contaminants into
food;
*
foods that are stored near chemicals can become contaminated;
*
storing food on the floor can make it more difficult to keep clean
and contamination may occur;
*
uncovered or unprotected food can become contaminated by pests,
micro-organisms and other foreign matter such as glass, hair, etc.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
make it difficult for pests to get into storage areas by sealing
all holes, cracks and crevices where pests may breed or enter;
*
store opened packaged products in clean, sealed food grade
containers or adequately reseal the package;
*
look for signs of pest infestation where dry products are stored,
for example: droppings, eggs, webs, feathers and odours;
*
check that your dry storage area is cleaned regularly (for example
once a week) and is not overcrowded;
*
check that you use the oldest stock first and that it is still
within ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ dates;
*
check that packaging is not damaged;
*
check that chemicals such as cleaning products are stored away
from food;
*
check that all food is stored off the floor;
*
store food in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications;
*
have the premises treated regularly by a licensed Pest control
operator.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
discard food that has signs of pest infestation (for example
droppings, eggs, webs or odours);
*
discard contaminated food or food that has been identified as
unsafe or unsuitable;
*
discard food with damaged packaging;
*
if there are signs of pest infestation contact your Pest control
operator specialist and arrange a treatment;
*
thoroughly clean the dry storage area if unclean.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
Record No. 10 – Pest control
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1– Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 5 – Pest control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 4 – Cold storage
=========================
Potentially hazardous foods are foods that might contain food
poisoning bacteria and are capable of making people sick if the foods
are not stored at correct temperatures.
The following are examples of potentially hazardous foods:
*
raw and cooked meat or foods containing meat, such as casseroles,
curries and lasagne;
*
dairy products, for example, milk, custard and dairy based
desserts;
*
seafood (excluding live seafood);
*
processed fruits and vegetables, for example, salads;
*
cooked rice and pasta;
*
foods containing eggs, beans, nuts or other protein rich foods,
such as quiche and soy products;
*
foods that contain these foods, such as sandwiches and rolls.
Potentially hazardous foods need to be stored below 5°C when in cold
storage.
Hazard
------
*
potentially hazardous food must be stored at 5°C or colder to
prevent bacteria from multiplying;
*
potentially hazardous foods left between 5°C and 60°C allow
bacteria to multiply quickly. Other foods become potentially
hazardous only after they are cooked, such as rice;
*
bacteria in juices from raw food can drip onto ready-to-eat food
and contaminate it. This is one example of cross contamination;
*
other contaminants can fall into uncovered or unprotected food.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
store all potentially hazardous foods in cold storage areas under
Temperature control;
*
check and record the temperature of food inside the refrigerator
using a thermometer — it should always be 5°C or colder;
*
all foods need to be stored in clean and covered food grade
containers or wrapped in a protective covering, such as plastic;
*
make sure that the cold storage area is not overcrowded with food,
as air will not be able to circulate and keep food cold;
*
never store food on the floor of a cold room, it can make it
difficult to clean and contamination may occur. It is also not
conducive to good air flow around goods;
*
make sure that raw food is separated from ready-to-eat food;
*
check that water and condensation from raw foods will not drip
onto ready-to-eat food;
*
make sure food does not stay in refrigeration for periods of time
that may render the food unsuitable. Identifying and date marking
the food will allow you to use the oldest stock first;
*
do not use food that is past its ‘use by’ date and check food that
is past its ‘best before’ date to ensure it is not damaged or
deteriorated;
*
check that the inside of cold storage equipment is clean and free
from mould;
*
clean refrigerators and cool rooms in accordance with your
cleaning schedule.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
if cold storage equipment is operating above 5°C, adjust the
Temperature controls and recheck the temperature again within one
hour;
*
if cold storage equipment is found to be unable to keep food at
5°C or below, have the equipment serviced/repaired;
*
throw away potentially hazardous food that has been above 5°C for
four (4) hours or more;
*
throw away ready-to-eat food that has been ‘cross contaminated’ by
raw food;
*
throw away food that is past its ‘use by’ date or food that is
damaged, deteriorated or perished;
*
throw away contaminated food or food that has been identified as
unsafe or unsuitable;
*
have a refrigeration mechanic check and service refrigerators and
cold rooms in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions or when
required.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 –Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 5 – Frozen storage
===========================
Freezing is an excellent way of keeping potentially hazardous foods
for long periods. There is a danger that if frozen food is thawed to
above 5°C, and then refrozen, bacteria that have multiplied when the
food is thawed can also be frozen. If frozen food begins to thaw, it
should be used straight away, and never refrozen.
Hazards
-------
*
frozen food that is stored for long periods of time can
deteriorate, compromising the suitability of the food;
*
if the temperature rises, frozen food may start to thaw and allow
bacteria to multiply;
*
foreign matter, chemicals or pests can contaminate food if not
properly covered or protected;
*
storing food on the floor can make it more difficult to keep clean
and contamination may occur.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
frozen food needs to be stored frozen hard (not partially thawed),
to stop bacteria from multiplying;
*
make sure food is stored and covered in clean containers. It
should be clearly labelled and dated to allow for stock rotation;
*
don’t overcrowd frozen storage areas as air will not be able to
circulate and keep food cold;
*
make sure that packaging isn’t damaged;
*
never store food on the floor of a freezer room it can make it
difficult to clean and contamination may occur. It is also not
conducive to good air flow around goods;
*
keep freezers clean;
*
check the food in your freezer regularly (eg. weekly) to see if
food is contaminated, damaged, deteriorated or perished.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
have the freezer serviced if it can’t keep food frozen hard;
*
if the freezer stops working and food partly thaws, place the food
in the refrigerator until it is completely thawed, then use as a
refrigerated food;
*
if food is completely thawed, but is colder than 5°C, place food
in the refrigerator and use as a refrigerated food, or use
straight away;
*
if you’re not sure how long the freezer hasn’t been working
properly, or you are unsure about the safety of any food, throw
the food away;
*
throw away contaminated, damaged, deteriorated or perished food.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 6 - Thawing
====================
Thawing frozen potentially hazardous food may pose a food safety risk
if the temperature of the food is between 5°C and 60°C during thawing,
allowing food poisoning bacteria to grow. The food safety risk is much
higher for frozen ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food being thawed
than for frozen raw potentially hazardous foods that will be cooked or
otherwise processed to make them safe before eating.
Ready-to-eat frozen potentially hazardous foods should be thawed in a
refrigerator operating at 5°C or below, or alternatively in the
microwave. If these foods are thawed at room temperature, food
poisoning bacteria may grow in the food and as the food will not
undergo any further processing (such as cooking) before it is eaten,
the bacteria will not be destroyed. It is important that, if the food
is thawed at room temperature the time that the food is at
temperatures between 5°C and 60°C needs to be noted to ensure that
safe time limits are not exceeded. The total safe time that
ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food can be outside Temperature
control is discussed in Support Program 4.
Hazards
-------
*
thawing potentially hazardous food out of refrigeration can allow
bacteria to multiply (i.e. under running water or on the bench at
room temperature);
*
bacteria in juices from raw or thawing potentially hazardous food
can drip onto ready-to-eat food, and contaminate it. This is one
example of cross contamination;
*
the centre of partially thawed potentially hazardous food may be
frozen and may not cook properly, allowing bacteria to survive;
*
food may become contaminated during thawing from foreign matter,
pests or poor personal hygiene and handling.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
plan ahead, and allow sufficient time to thaw potentially
hazardous food in the refrigerator or cool room. Some food can
take as long as one or two days to completely thaw;
*
alternatively, thaw potentially hazardous food in the microwave.
However, there may be uneven heating of the food using this
method;
*
remember to thaw raw frozen food on a shelf below ready-to-eat
food. This will ensure that cross contamination (the juices from
thawing food falling onto ready-to-eat food) does not occur;
*
keep all food protected, covered, wrapped or in a food grade
container while thawing;
*
do not re-freeze thawed food;
*
check that ready-to-eat foods are protected from cross
contamination by thawing foods;
*
small portions of raw frozen meat and fish may be able to be
safely cooked without complete thawing, however, large portions of
food should be completely thawed before cooking.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
do not use potentially hazardous food until it is completely
thawed;
*
throw away thawed potentially hazardous food that has been left to
stand at above 5°C for more than four (4) hours;
*
throw away food that has been contaminated during thawing;
*
throw away any food that has been frozen more than once.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 7 - Preparation
========================
Even the freshest raw food contains bacteria right from the start, so
it’s important to follow the steps listed below to help prevent
food-borne illness. Preparation means preparing food for cooking,
packaging, vitamising, reheating, serving or sale.
There are three possible ways that food can become unsafe to eat:
1.
Biological - in the right conditions, bacteria will
multiply;
2.
Physical - caused by things that should not be in food,
like dirt, hair, glass or stones;
3.
Chemical - caused by chemicals, such as cleaning agents,
detergents and fly sprays.
By preventing each of these hazards, you can break the food-borne
illness chain, prevent food-borne illness and prepare safe food.
Hazards
-------
*
people who do not understand safe food preparation practices can
accidentally contaminate food;
*
bacteria can be transferred to food from unwashed hands and
clothing;
*
if potentially hazardous food is left too long out of Temperature
control, bacteria can multiply and cause a food-borne illness;
*
bacteria can be transferred to food from equipment and utensils;
*
bacteria on raw potentially hazardous food, including food used
for garnishing can contaminate ready-to-eat food;
*
foreign objects may fall into uncovered food;
*
cleaning chemicals that are not stored or labelled properly may be
misused resulting in contamination of food;
*
persons who have a food-borne illness or have the symptoms of a
food-borne illness or a condition may contaminate food;
*
unwashed fruit and vegetables may contain contaminants such as
dirt or chemicals;
*
unclean wiping cloths can spread bacteria.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
ensure that food handlers have appropriate skills and knowledge
for each food preparation task;
*
check that food preparation surfaces, equipment and utensils are
cleaned and sanitised before you use them;
*
always wear or change into clean clothes before preparing food;
*
wash your hands properly before touching food, after using the
toilet or touching hair or face;
*
minimise the time that potentially hazardous food is above 5°C and
return food to the refrigerator during any break in preparation;
*
make sure that ready-to-eat food is kept apart from raw
ingredients during preparation.
*
if possible, use separate utensils and cutting boards when
preparing raw food and ready-to-eat food (these may be colour
coded for easy recognition, but this is not essential).
Alternatively, prepare ready-to-eat food and raw food separately,
washing, sanitising and thoroughly drying cutting boards and
utensils between use;
*
wash fruit and vegetables intended for immediate consumption
including those were the skin is not intended to be eaten;
*
wiping cloths should be replaced frequently (eg. daily) and
cleaned, rinsed and dried between uses;
*
throw away single use items after one use;
*
make sure that cleaning chemicals are stored in a designated area
and are kept in properly sealed and labelled containers;
*
food handlers must check that the vitamiser is clean and not
broken or damaged;
*
vitamiser must be cleaned and washed between uses and sanitised at
the end of the day;
*
food handlers must thoroughly wash and dry their hands before
vitamising food and they must follow support program 3 - personal
hygiene and health of food handlers;
*
Before vitamising, food handler is to visually check to ensure
that the vitamiser is clean and the blades are intact prior to and
after the preparation process
Corrective actions
------------------
*
throw away any food contaminated by dirty equipment;
*
throw away food where there is any chance that contamination or
cross contamination has occurred;
*
re-train food handlers that have been found to be mishandling
food;
*
remind people preparing food of good hygiene practices and retrain
where necessary;
*
throw away food that has been between 5°C and 60°C for more than
four (4) hours;
*
if the vitamised food temperature is less than 600C, reheat to 750C
or more. Vitamised food found to be at room temperature for more
than one hour, but less than two hours, can be reheated and used
immediately or discarded. Food held for more than two hours must
be discarded.
*
a dirty vitamiser must be cleaned and sanitised according to
support program 2 – cleaning and sanitising.
*
discard any food suspected of being contaminated.
*
if the equipment is broken, notify the food safety supervisor
regarding equipment maintenance.
*
if staff are not following the controls or monitoring correctly,
they may require retraining.
*
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 9 – Equipment maintenance and calibration of thermometers
Record No. 12 – Staff training
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 3 – Personal hygiene and health of food handlers
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Support Program No. 10 – Staff training
Activity 8 - Cooking
====================
Where a process step is needed to reduce to safe levels any pathogens
that may be present in the food, you must use a process step that is
reasonably known to achieve the microbiological safety of the food.
The safety of food is usually achieved through cooking and the cooking
step must be adequate to achieve this.
Hazards
-------
*
potentially hazardous foods, which are not fully cooked, will not
be safe to eat, as bacteria will not be killed;
*
food may be contaminated after the cooking process, for example:
unclean equipment or utensils may add bacteria to the food.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
soups, sauces, gravies and casseroles that use raw ingredients
should be brought to a boil, which will prevent bacteria surviving
the cooking process;
*
use a thermometer to check that potentially hazardous foods like
rotating spits, rolled roasts and whole chickens are thoroughly
cooked. The internal temperature of these foods must reach at
least 74°C;
*
always use clean equipment and utensils during cooking;
*
using a probe thermometer, record a sample of these internal
temperatures on a daily basis;
*
check that all staff members know how to use a thermometer and how
and where to record temperatures.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
if the temperature in the centre of the potentially hazardous food
does not reach at least 74°C, continue cooking until the internal
temperature is achieved;
*
check recipes and cooking times if the centre of the potentially
hazardous food does not reach the required temperature, adjust as
necessary.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 3 – Personal hygiene and health of food handlers
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Activity 9 – Cooling food
=========================
If you cook potentially hazardous food that you intend to cool and use
later, you need to cool the food to 5°C or colder as quickly as
possible. There may be food poisoning bacteria in the food even though
it has been cooked. Faster cooling times limit the time when these
bacteria are able to grow or form toxins.
When cooling cooked potentially hazardous food, cool the food within
the following timeframes:
*
from 60°C to 21°C within two hours; and
*
from 21°C to 5°C within a further four hours.
This means you have a maximum of six hours to cool food from 60°C to
5°C or below.
If you don’t know how fast your food is cooling, use a probe
thermometer to measure the warmest part of the food – usually in the
centre. To chill food quickly, break it up into smaller portions in
shallow containers. Take care not to contaminate the food as you do
this.
Hazards
-------
*
potentially hazardous food that is not cooled quickly enough can
allow bacteria to multiply and cause a food-borne illness;
*
foreign objects may fall into uncovered food;
*
unclean food containers used for cooling potentially hazardous
food can contaminate the food with food poisoning bacteria.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
using a probe thermometer, check that the temperature at the
centre of potentially hazardous food reduces from 60°C to 21°C
within two (2) hours and from 21°C to 5°C within a further four
(4) hours;
*
check that the potentially hazardous food is being cooled in an
appropriate clean, uncontaminated storage container;
*
protect storage containers from contamination and label with the
type of food and the date before placing into the coolroom,
refrigerator or freezer;
*
potentially hazardous food can be left at room temperature until
it drops to 60°C (this temperature should be checked with your
probe thermometer), the food can then be put in the refrigerator
to continue cooling;
*
do not put hot food straight from the oven or stove into a
refrigerator, coolroom or freezer, because it can cause the
refrigeration temperature to rise. A guide to when to put cooked
food in the refrigerator is to let it stand for 20-30 minutes
prior to placing under refrigeration;
*
check that the temperature inside the refrigerator does not rise
higher than 5°C while cooling food;
*
divide potentially hazardous food into smaller batches and use
shallow containers (for example less than 10cm deep) to help it
cool quicker;
*
make sure there is adequate air circulation around containers by
not overloading refrigerators, coolrooms or freezers;
*
never mix left-overs with a new batch of cooled food;
*
separate raw and cooked foods.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
throw away food if the above cooling times and temperatures have
not been reached;
*
if refrigerator temperatures rise above 5°C during the cooling of
food, review and modify cooling practices to ensure that
temperatures remain below 5°C;
*
discard any potentially hazardous food that may have been
contaminated during cooling.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 –Temperature control log
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 10 – Reheating and hot holding
=======================================
Bacteria can grow in food that is reheated too slowly. Holding food at
temperatures where bacteria can multiply can also cause a food-borne
illness. If you reheat previously cooked and cooled potentially
hazardous food, you must reheat it rapidly to 60°C or hotter.
You should aim to reheat food to 60°C within a maximum of two hours to
minimise the amount of time that food is at temperatures that favour
the growth of bacteria or formation of toxins.
This requirement applies only to potentially hazardous food that you
want to hold hot, for example on your stove or in a food display unit.
It does not apply to food you reheat to serve to customers for
immediate consumption, for example, in a restaurant or a take away
shop.
Hazards
-------
*
bacteria that may have survived the cooking process or bacteria
that may have been introduced since the cooking process can
multiply if potentially hazardous food is reheated too slowly;
*
bacteria can multiply in potentially hazardous food that is not
reheated or held at 60°C or above;
*
bacteria from unclean equipment or utensils may contaminate
reheated or hot held food;
*
foreign objects can contaminate uncovered or unprotected food;
*
cross contamination can occur by adding raw food or new batches of
potentially hazardous food to food already in hot holding units.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
using a thermometer, check that the temperature at the centre of
potentially hazardous food being reheated reaches at least 60°C in
two hours or less;
*
maintain reheated potentially hazardous food at 60°C or above;
*
stir or turn potentially hazardous food during reheating or when
hot holding so that the heat is evenly dispersed throughout the
food;
*
always use clean equipment and utensils to handle reheated food;
*
always use a clean utensil for taste testing and never reuse;
*
hot holding equipment such as a Bain Marie should never be used to
reheat food. Food should be heated to above 60°C before being
placed in the Bain Marie;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been cooked and cooled should
only be reheated once;
*
ensure the hot holding equipment is clean and pre-heat before use;
*
use a temperature setting on hot holding equipment that keeps the
food at or above 60°C;
*
do not overload hot holding equipment;
*
when re-stocking potentially hazardous food in hot holding
equipment, never add new batches of food to old batches of food,
remove the old batch and replace with new batch;
*
hot holding equipment must protect the food from contamination
from foreign objects;
*
using a clean thermometer, check that the temperature of food
being hot held is being maintained at 60°C or above;
*
food should not be piled above the level of the trays or be held
in plates above the trays;
*
ensure hot holding equipment is regularly maintained; and
*
check that hot holding equipment is kept clean.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
discard potentially hazardous food if the temperature at the
centre has not reached 60°C in two hours or less;
*
use immediately any potentially hazardous food that has been held
between 5°C and 60°C for more than 2 hours, but discard food that
has been held between 5°C and 60°C for more than four (4) hours;
*
discard reheated food if left over;
*
if hot holding equipment cannot maintain food temperatures above
60°C, check whether this is because too much food is being held in
the unit;
*
call service agent if equipment fails to work correctly; and
*
discard contaminated food.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 11 – Serving, self-serve and displaying food
=====================================================
Serving food safely relies on food handlers practising good personal
hygiene and handling food safely, which includes avoiding cross
contamination. In regard to self-service areas, staff will need to
monitor the way clients or customers use the self-service equipment to
check that food is not being contaminated.
Hazards
-------
*
delays in serving food can allow food poisoning bacteria to
multiply;
*
food poisoning bacteria can multiply if potentially hazardous food
is kept between 5°C and 60°C;
*
unclean serving utensils and other equipment may contaminate food;
*
poor food handling by staff and/or customers may contaminate food;
*
food may become contaminated by foreign objects that have fallen
into uncovered or unprotected food;
*
use of display decorations and garnishes can contaminate food;
*
food poisoning bacteria can be transferred from an old batch of
food to a new batch if they are mixed together; and
*
some people can be severely allergic to certain types of food.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
serve food as quickly as possible after preparation and take into
account the requirements of the 4-hour/2-hour guide;
*
don’t prepare food too far in advance of serving;
*
ensure that people who serve food or supervise self-service food
displays have appropriate skills and knowledge for the tasks that
they do;
*
ensure that if staff serving food are using gloves that they
understand how to use gloves safely;
*
provide separate clean utensils for each food on display, or
provide other methods of dispensing food that minimises food
becoming contaminated;
*
throw away single use items after using them, including straws,
paper towels, cups and plates;
*
ensure that protective barriers (for example, sneeze-guards) are
installed to protect food in display cabinets;
*
refresh food displays with completely fresh batches of food. Never
mix old food with fresh batches;
*
use a clean and sanitised thermometer to check the temperature of
potentially hazardous food on display. (You do not need to check
the temperature of every dish, just a representative sample);
*
hot food should be held at 60°C or above. Make sure that all
potentially hazardous foods are thrown out if kept between 5°C and
60°C for four hours or more;
*
keep cold food at 5°C or below if holding food cold;
*
if you are displaying frozen food, it must be frozen hard (not
partially thawed) or as the manufacturer specifies;
*
never reuse any self-serve food left over from the previous day on
the following day; and
*
ensure that menus highlight allergenic ingredients in dishes if
not apparent from the name of the dish, and advise staff so they
may be able to assist customers with queries.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for less than two hours (cumulative time) must be refrigerated or
used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than two hours (cumulative time) but less than four
hours must be used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than four hours (cumulative time) must be thrown out;
*
throw away any food you suspect may be contaminated; and
*
replace soiled serving utensils with clean ones if there has been
any possibility of misuse.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 3 – Personal hygiene and health of food handlers
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Support Program No. 10 – Staff training
Activity 12 – Allergens, food packaging and labelling
=====================================================
If your business operations include packaging food, you have a
responsibility to ensure that the process, including the packaging
material and labelling does not compromise food safety.
Certain foods can cause some people to have an allergic reaction which
can vary in severity from mild upsets to severe anaphylactic
reactions. It is important that you are able to identify which of your
products contain allergens.
You must declare the presence of these foods either on the label (if
the food is packaged) or in another way such as on a menu or verbally
upon request.
Hazards
-------
*
foods containing allergens may cause severe reactions in sensitive
people;
*
common allergens include: gluten (found in wheat, rye, barley and
oats and from foods containing these products), crustacea
(shellfish) and crustacea products, egg and egg products, fish and
fish products, soy beans and soy bean products, peanuts and other
nut products, milk and milk products, sesame seeds and sesame seed
products and sulphites more than l0mg/kg;
*
foods may become contaminated with allergens if processes aren’t
followed;
*
staff who are unaware of a customers allergies may serve food
containing allergens;
*
incorrect, contaminated or damaged packaging materials may not
offer adequate protection for food;
*
packaging material that has come into contact with chemicals may
contaminate the safety or suitability of the food being packed.
Unclean packaging material may contaminate food;
*
some food types can react with or be contaminated by some types of
packaging material, for example, some packaging material may not
be appropriate for acidic foods;
*
an unclean packaging area may contaminate food being packed.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
list any allergens on the label of packaged products;
*
identify foods containing allergens on menus;
*
prepare special meals separately from normal meals;
*
advise staff serving food of special requirements;
*
check packaging for damage and use only clean uncontaminated
packaging materials;
*
store packaging material in a designated area, away from cleaning
chemicals, and other matter that might cause contamination;
*
check that materials being used for packaging are appropriate to
the food being packed, for example: some packaging materials may
not be appropriate for acidic foods, refrigeration, freezing or
microwaving;
*
make sure that the packaging material being used will not
contaminate the food being packed, including physical and chemical
contamination;
*
make sure that the area used for packing is clean and sanitary
before starting and during work;
*
ensure that food packaging machinery is maintained in satisfactory
working condition, including the use of appropriate lubricants and
make sure these products do not contaminate food;
*
food handlers need to observe high levels of personal hygiene and
ensure they do not directly or indirectly contaminate food during
packaging;
*
unless specifically exempt, packaged food must be labelled in
accordance with the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Food
Standards Code;
*
it is important that labels contain information about the
ingredients included in the product you are packing and labelling.
Ingredient labelling is particularly important for persons
suffering from food allergies. Refer to the Australia New Zealand
Food Standards Code and other informative material on food
labelling produced by Food Standards Australia New Zealand.
Contact details are included in Appendix 1 – List of resources.
*
ensure that there are adequate systems/processes to deal with
Customer complaints or Food recalls.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
food that may contain an allergen should not be served to
sensitive patients. It may still be used in the generic meals;
*
update menus to identify foods containing allergens;
*
contact supplier or manufacturer of packaging material if
packaging material is damaged or contaminated and replace;
*
revise cleaning and sanitising procedures if they are inadequate;
*
throw out food that has been contaminated by packaging or during
packaging process;
*
recall incorrectly labelled products or possibly contaminated
products that have been distributed.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 4 – Food recall
Record No. 5 – Customer complaints
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
Record No. 9 – Equipment maintenance and calibration of thermometers
Record No. 10 – Pest control
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 5 – Pest control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Support Program No. 7 – Product recall schedule
Support Program No. 8 – Customer complaints
Support Program No. 10 – Staff training
Activity 13 – Transporting food
===============================
This activity covers transporting food from a supplier to your
premises and from your premises to your customers or to other outlets.
It is essential that vehicles and equipment used to transport food are
designed and constructed to protect the food.
Hazards
-------
*
dust, dirt, chemicals, pests or other foreign objects may
contaminate unprotected food;
*
food poisoning bacteria can multiply if potentially hazardous food
is transported between 5°C and 60°C; and
*
food poisoning bacteria can be transferred from raw food to
ready-to-eat food if transported incorrectly. This is called cross
contamination.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
all food for transport must be covered or packed to protect the
food from becoming contaminated;
*
all ready-to-eat food must be kept separate from raw food;
*
ensure that the food transport vehicle can maintain the correct
temperatures for the type of food it carries;
*
check that cold food is transported at 5°C or colder;
*
check that frozen food is transported frozen hard (not partially
thawed);
*
check that hot food is transported at 60°C or above;
*
if food is transported between 5°C and 60°C, use the 4-hour/2-hour
guide;
*
if the food transport vehicle does not have a heating or cooling
system, use insulated boxes to maintain food at safe temperatures;
*
make sure that the food is transported away from any chemicals
that might contaminate the food; and
*
make sure that the delivery vehicle and transport boxes are clean
and food is packaged correctly.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
throw away food that has become contaminated (eg. foreign objects,
chemicals);
*
throw away ready-to-eat food that has been contaminated by raw
food;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for less than two hours (cumulative time) must be refrigerated or
used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than two hours but less than four hours (cumulative
time) must be used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than four hours (cumulative time) must be thrown out;
and
*
review the food transport and other relevant activities if
potentially hazardous food is being held between 5°C and 60°C for
four (4) hours or longer, including any such time prior to and
after transport and before using the food.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
For off-site events:
--------------------
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
Please refer to the following support programs:
-----------------------------------------------
Support Program No. 1 – Food premises and equipment
Support Program No. 2 – Cleaning and sanitising
Support Program No. 4 – Temperature control
Support Program No. 6 – Waste management
Activity 14 – Off-site events
=============================
If your food premises is catering for local events, festivals or any
food event away from your food premises, you need to be vigilant to
ensure that the food you provide is safe. The food safety problems
that may occur at an event will depend on the food handling activities
that you will have at this event. The local government or other
relevant authority should be contacted to determine if your event
needs to be licensed or if there are other specific legislated
requirements.
Hazards
-------
*
poor storage facilities may cause food to spoil or become
contaminated;
*
if equipment is unclean it could contaminate the food at the event
and cause a food-borne illness;
*
untrained staff may unknowingly contaminate food;
*
waste food may contaminate the food being prepared or served; and
*
lack of Temperature control in off-site events may result in the
growth of bacteria and lead to food-borne illness.
Controls and monitoring
-----------------------
*
for each event you should determine what food handling activities
will happen at the event;
*
follow the food handling instructions described throughout the
previous activities in this document;
*
before the event, check what facilities will be available at the
venue or site for food storage, preparation, cooking, etc. If
facilities are not available at the site you will need to make
arrangements for appropriate equipment to be available. For
example, will you need to have cold storage, cooking equipment,
hot holding or cold holding food displays, etc?;
*
before the event, check that all equipment is clean;
*
review what food will be prepared/served at the event and decide
what transport arrangements need to be made to get the food to the
venue, particularly for frozen, chilled and hot foods;
*
check that all food suppliers are included in your Approved food
suppliers list. In case of a Food recall, you need to include any
additional food suppliers from whom you purchased food for the
event;
*
check what staff will be working at this event to ensure they have
all been trained to follow the food safety program and that they
have the appropriate skills and knowledge to prepare safe food;
*
you may need to make arrangements to collect waste food and water
at the end of the event and also make provisions for the removal
of waste during the event;
*
check what hand washing facilities, cleaning facilities and
cleaning materials are available at the event venue;
*
a food business must provide hand washing facilities within the
areas where food handlers work and where the hands of food
handlers are likely to become a source of contamination. A food
business must use potable water for all activities that use water
on food premises, unless it can be demonstrated that using
non-potable water will not adversely affect the safety of food
handled by the food business (for example, non-potable water used
to fight fires);
*
ensure your transport arrangements are adequate to prevent
contamination of the food. Refer to Activity 13 – Transporting
food;
*
you may need to make provision for the equipment to be cleaned at
the venue or removed from the venue and cleaned before the next
day of the event. Alternatively only use disposable items; and
*
nominate an experienced staff member to supervise and keep the
off-site event records.
Corrective actions
------------------
*
if equipment does not work appropriately at the event, have it
fixed or replaced immediately, particularly if it is used to store
or display hot or cold food. Only use equipment if it operates
satisfactorily and check the temperatures regularly (i.e. at least
daily);
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for less than two hours (cumulative time) must be refrigerated or
used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than two hours but less than four hours (cumulative
time) must be used immediately;
*
potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than four hours (cumulative time) must be thrown out;
and
*
throw away ready-to-eat food that has become contaminated (ie. by
raw food). Note: the time period for which potentially hazardous
food has been kept between 5°C and 60°C should include the time
kept between such temperatures in the transport vehicle and prior
to transportation.
Please keep the following records for this activity:
----------------------------------------------------
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
Record No. 13 – Off-site events
*
Complete the off-site event checklist for each day of the event
*
Complete Part 1 of the event checklist just before the event
*
During the event, complete Part 2 of the event checklist
Support program 1 – Food premises and equipment
===============================================
Facilities are required to ensure that their food premises, fixtures,
fittings, equipment and transport vehicles are designed and
constructed so as to allow ease of cleaning. Facilities must also
ensure that the premises are provided with the necessary services of
water, waste disposal, light, ventilation, cleaning and personal
hygiene facilities, storage space and access to toilets. The following
paragraphs outline the basic requirements for design and fit-out of a
food premises.
Water supply
------------
The premises must have an adequate supply of potable water for all
activities that require water, unless it can be demonstrated that the
use of non-potable water for a specific purpose, for example, fire
fighting will not affect the safety of the food.
Sewage and waste water disposal
-------------------------------
The premises must have a sewage and waste water system that will
effectively dispose of all sewage and waste water. This system must be
constructed and located so that it will not pollute the water supply
or contaminate food.
Storage of waste and recyclable matter
--------------------------------------
The premises must have capacity to hold all the garbage and recyclable
matter on the food premises until collection or removal. The storage
must be:
*
enclosed or lidded so that pests cannot get access to the garbage
or recyclable material; and
*
designed and constructed from non-porous materials so that they
may be easily and effectively cleaned.
Ventilation
-----------
Facilities must have sufficient natural or mechanical ventilation to
effectively remove fumes, smoke, steam and vapours.
Lighting
--------
Facilities must have a lighting system that provides sufficient
natural or artificial light for the activities on the food premises.
Floors, walls and ceilings
--------------------------
Floors, walls and ceilings of premises must be designed and
constructed so they:
*
can be easily and effectively cleaned;
*
are unable to absorb food particles, grease or water;
*
do not allow the ponding of water; and
*
are sealed to prevent the entry of dirt, dust and pests.
Note: The requirements relating to floors, walls and ceilings do not
apply to dining, drinking and other areas where the public has access.
Fixtures, fittings and equipment
--------------------------------
Fixtures, fittings and equipment must be adequate for the production
of safe food and fit for their intended use. All fixtures, fittings
and equipment must be designed, constructed, located and installed so
that they:
*
will not contaminate food;
*
can be easily and effectively cleaned;
*
provide easy access to floors, ceilings, and other surfaces for
effective cleaning;
*
are unable to provide spaces where pests may breed;
*
all food contact surfaces of fixtures, fittings and equipment must
be:
*
able to be effectively cleaned and/or sanitised;
*
unable to absorb food particles, grease or water;
*
constructed with material that will not contaminate food.
*
all eating and drinking utensils must be:
*
able to be easily and effectively cleaned and sanitised. This
includes the appropriate design of equipment used to clean
utensils must be designed to ensure that effective cleaning and
sanitising can be achieved;
*
must not be chipped, broken or cracked.
*
hand washing facilities must be:
*
located in food preparation areas and adjacent to toilets of
permanent fixtures;
*
supplied with warm running potable water;
*
of a size that allows easy and effective hand washing;
*
clearly designated for the sole purpose of washing hands, arms
and face;
*
supplied with soap or other item that may be used to
thoroughly clean hands; and
*
provided with single use towels or other means of effectively
drying hands and a container for used towels.
Storage facilities
------------------
Facilities must have adequate storage space for the storage of items
that are likely to be a source of contamination of food, including
chemicals, clothing and personal belongings. Storage facilities must
be located where there is no likelihood of stored items contaminating
food or food contact surfaces.
Toilet facilities
-----------------
Adequate toilets must be available for the use of food handlers.
Food transport vehicles
-----------------------
Vehicles used to transport food must be designed and constructed to
protect food if there is a likelihood of food being contaminated
during transport. Parts of vehicles used to transport food must be
designed and constructed so that they can be effectively cleaned.
Food contact surfaces in parts of vehicles used to transport food must
be designed and constructed to be effectively cleaned and, if
necessary, sanitised.
Maintenance
-----------
Regular maintenance is essential to ensure the premises, fixtures,
fittings and equipment are maintained in a good state of repair and
working order, so as not to compromise food safety and suitability.
Food premises, fixtures, fittings and equipment and those parts of
vehicles that are used to transport food need to be properly
maintained to:
*
prevent contamination of food from flaking plaster, paint, timber,
broken glass, leaking pipes, etc.;
*
enable effective cleaning and, if necessary, sanitising;
*
ensure pests do not gain access to the building or vehicle from
holes in ceilings, walls, etc.;
*
ensure the equipment works as intended; and
*
ensure any chipped, broken or cracked eating or drinking utensils
are not used.
Calibrating thermometers
------------------------
All facilities are required to have at least one probe thermometer
accurate to +/-1°C, available for use at all times. Your thermometer
does not have to be expensive, but must meet the minimum requirements.
To ensure your thermometer meets the required accuracy, you will have
to calibrate it regularly. It is recommended that this is done around
once every six (6) months. This frequency may vary depending on the
use of the thermometer.
If you are calibrating your thermometer yourself, it is important to
use both the ice point and boiling point methods to ensure the
thermometer is accurate in its upper and lower ranges.
Ice point calibration
To calibrate your thermometer using the ice point calibration method,
follow these steps:
1.
Fill a plastic container with crushed ice;
2.
Mix enough chilled water to produce slurry, but not
enough to float the ice;
3.
Stir the slurry vigorously, insert the probe of the
thermometer into the iced slurry;
4.
Wait for at least three minutes and then record the
reading;
5.
To ensure the readings are correct and accurate, take
readings at least two minutes apart and the results
should be within 1°C of each other. The reading should
be 0°C (if the readings do not agree then you should
have the thermometer replaced or serviced); and
6.
Record your readings.
Boiling point calibration
To calibrate your thermometer using the boiling point calibration
method follow these steps:
1.
Heat a saucepan of water on the stove;
2.
Wait for the water to come to a continuous rolling boil;
3.
Insert the probe of the thermometer into the water;
4.
Wait for at least three minutes and then record the
reading;
5.
To ensure the readings are correct and accurate, take
readings at least two minutes apart and the results,
should be within 1°C of each other. The reading should
be 100°C (if the readings do not agree then you should
have the thermometer replaced or serviced); and
6.
Record your readings.
Mechanical calibration
Some more expensive thermometers come with a mechanical calibration
unit. Follow the manufacturer’s directions on calibrating your
thermometer this way. Alternatively, you may be able to return your
thermometer to the manufacturer for calibration.
Support program 2 – Cleaning and Sanitising
===========================================
What is cleaning?
-----------------
Cleaning in the food industry is a process that removes visible
contamination such as food waste, dirt and grease from a surface. This
process is usually achieved by the use of water and detergent.
Micro-organisms (bacteria etc) will be removed, but the cleaning
process is not designed to destroy micro-organisms.
What is sanitising?
-------------------
Sanitising is a process that destroys micro-organisms, thereby
reducing the numbers of micro-organisms present on a surface. This is
usually achieved by the use of heat and chemicals or chemicals.
Cleaning and sanitising should usually be done as separate processes.
A surface needs to be thoroughly cleaned before it is sanitised as
sanitisers are unlikely to be effective in the presence of food
residues, grease and detergents.
What needs to be cleaned and sanitised?
---------------------------------------
Anything that comes into contact with food must be cleaned and
sanitised. Items which do not come into contact with food need only be
cleaned. The table below gives some examples.
Items to be cleaned and sanitised
Items to be cleaned
Plates and bowls
Floors
Cutlery
Walls
Glasses, cups and mugs
Ceilings
Utensils for preparing and serving food
Rubbish bins
Cutting boards
Windows
Preparation benches
Refrigerators
Storage containers and trays
Cool rooms and freezer rooms
Food display units
Light fittings
Food preparation sinks
Cupboards and shelves
Hand wash basins
Cleaning equipment (mop, buckets etc)
Processing fresh food using dirty equipment will transfer
contamination and possibly harmful bacteria. Food utensils and
equipment must be cleaned and sanitised before each use and between
being used for raw food and ready-to-eat food. Equipment and utensils
may also need to be cleaned and sanitised if they have been used for
long periods to prepare or process potentially hazardous foods, eg.
meat slicers. The surfaces that food may come in contact with must
also be cleaned and sanitised.
Planning for cleaning
---------------------
When planning your cleaning and sanitising program, remember the
following points:
*
start at the back and work towards the front. Start high and work
your way down;
*
single-use paper towels are better than cloths. If you use cloths,
they must be washed in hot water and allowed to dry after every
use;
*
use the right size brush or cleaning tool for each task;
*
use food-grade detergents and sanitisers, always following the
manufacturers instructions;
*
clean as you go;
*
keep cleaning chemicals away from food storage areas;
*
disassemble equipment such as the meat slicer before starting to
clean it;
*
a dishwasher will sanitise most small equipment, cutlery, plates
and glasses, but drip-dry equipment or use clean tea towels where
this is not possible;
*
educate staff on correct cleaning and sanitising procedures;
*
provide regular checks on cleaning carried out and instruct staff
where required;
*
make sure the containers for garbage and recycled matter are large
enough for the amount of waste you produce and are capable of
being easily cleaned; and
*
ensure that all equipment used for cleaning (eg. mops, buckets,
cloths, brooms etc) are also kept clean.
Cleaning procedures and records
-------------------------------
A cleaning procedure is a set of written instructions that describe
everything that needs to be done to keep your business clean. It sets
out the tasks of cleaning and sanitising, how often each job needs to
be done, how it should be done, and who should do it.
A cleaning record is a way of documenting that the cleaning tasks have
been done by the responsible personnel.
What does a cleaning procedure and record look like?
----------------------------------------------------
Begin at the back of your premises, write down every piece of
equipment that needs to be cleaned as you walk towards the front.
Then, write down how you will clean that piece of equipment, how often
you will clean it, what materials and chemicals will be used and who
will do the cleaning. These instructions will be noted on the cleaning
procedure.
Development tools of both the cleaning procedure and cleaning record
are provided in Know Your Food Business. Details of where to get this
booklet are in Appendix 1.
Six steps to proper cleaning
----------------------------
1.
Pre-clean: scrape, wipe or sweep away food scraps and
rinse with water;
2.
Wash: use hot water and detergent to take off any grease
and dirt. Soak if needed;
3.
Rinse: rinse off any loose dirt or detergent foam;
4.
Sanitise: use a sanitiser to kill any remaining germs;
5.
Final rinse: wash off sanitiser (read sanitiser’s
instructions to see if you need to do this); and
6.
Dry: allow to drip-dry if not possible, dry with a clean
tea-towel.
How to sanitise
---------------
Most food poisoning bacteria are killed if they are exposed to
chemical sanitisers, heat, or a combination of both.
To sanitise:
*
soak items in water at 77°C for 30 seconds; or
*
use a commercial sanitiser following the manufacturer’s
instructions; or
*
soak items in water which contains bleach. The water temperature
required will vary with the concentration of chlorine. The table
following shows the amount of bleach required and the
corresponding water temperature to make sanitising solutions.
With household bleach
(4% chlorine)
With commercial bleach
(10% chlorine)
Minimum water temperature
49°C
38°C
13°C
49°C
38°C
13°C
Concentration required
25 ppm
50 ppm
100 ppm
25 ppm
50 ppm
100 ppm
5 litres
3.12 mL
6.25 mL
12.5 mL
1.25 mL
2.5 mL
5 mL
10 litres
6.25 mL
1.5 mL
25 mL
2.5 mL
5 mL
10 mL
15 litres
31.25 mL
62.5 mL
13.5 mL
12.5 mL
25 mL
50 mL
ppm – parts per million
Support program 3 – Personal hygiene and health of food handlers
================================================================
What about personal hygiene?
----------------------------
Food handlers’ personal hygiene practices and cleanliness must
minimise the risk of food contamination.
The most important things food handlers need to know are that they
must:
*
do whatever is reasonable to prevent their body, anything from
their body or anything they are wearing, coming into contact with
food or food contact surfaces;
*
do whatever is reasonable to stop unnecessary contact with
ready-to-eat food;
*
wear clean outer clothing, depending on the type of work they do;
*
make sure bandages or dressings on any exposed parts of the body
are covered with a waterproof covering;
*
do not eat over unprotected food or surfaces likely to come in
contact with food;
*
do not sneeze, blow or cough over unprotected food or surfaces
likely to come into contact with food;
*
do not spit or smoke where food is handled; and
*
do not urinate or defecate except in a toilet.
Hand washing
------------
Food handlers are expected to wash their hands whenever their hands
are likely to contaminate food. This includes washing their hands:
*
immediately before working with ready-to-eat food or after
handling raw food;
*
immediately after using the toilet;
*
before they start handling food or go back to handling food after
other work;
*
immediately after smoking, coughing, sneezing, using a
handkerchief or disposable tissue, eating, drinking or using
tobacco or similar substances; and
*
after touching their hair, scalp or a body opening.
How should food handlers wash their hands?
------------------------------------------
1.
Use the hand washing facilities provided by the
business;
2.
Clean their hands thoroughly using soap;
3.
Use warm running water; and
4.
Dry their hands thoroughly on a single use towel or in
another way that is not likely to transfer
disease-causing organisms onto the hands.
The food safety supervisor must also oversee personal hygiene
requirements that aim to prevent contamination of the food resulting
from the actions of a person handling food. Preventative measures
include:
*
washing hands;
*
wearing clean clothing;
*
avoiding contact with food; and
*
covering wounds.
For more information, see the section on skills and knowledge.
Food businesses have specific responsibilities relating to the health
of people who handle food, the provision of hand washing facilities,
telling food handlers of their health and hygiene obligations and
respecting the privacy of food handlers.
The health of food handlers
---------------------------
It is very important that people who may be suffering from or carrying
certain illnesses or suffering from some conditions do not handle food
or food contact surfaces. This is particularly important if they are
likely to contaminate food while they are working.
If a food handler has ……
The food handler will ……
One or any of the following symptoms of foodborne disease:
*
diarrhoea
*
vomiting
*
sore throat with fever
*
fever
*
jaundice
1.
Immediately inform the food safety supervisor
2.
Seek medical attention
3.
Not return to work until they have been symptom free for 48 hours
Been diagnosed with any of the following foodborne diseases:
*
Hepatitis A
*
Norovirus
*
Typhoid fever
*
Shigellosis
*
Staphylococcal or Streptococcal disease
1.
Cease all contact with food and food contact surfaces
2.
Not return to food handling duties until medical clearance is
provided
An exposed wound or cut or infected skin sore
Cover with a bandage and highly visible waterproof colouring
Any discharge from their ears, nose or eyes
Take medication to stop any nasal or other discharge that may
contaminate food
The supervisor will not disclose any of the above medical information
to anyone with the exception of the proprietor of the business or a
food enforcement officer, without the consent of the food handler. The
company will not use this information for any purpose other than to
protect food from contamination.
Support program 4 – Temperature control
=======================================
Temperature control and monitoring is usually the first thing people
think of and do to ensure safe food. The basis of Temperature control
is to prevent the multiplication of food poisoning bacteria by either
lowering or raising the temperature to a point where the bacteria
either die or stop multiplying.
However, bacteria require certain environmental conditions for optimal
growth. These are:
*
temperature (between 5°C and 60°C – the temperature danger zone);
*
time (bacteria double every twenty (20) minutes in optimal
conditions);
*
pH (around 7 or neutral);
*
water; and
*
protein (food source).
By controlling, one or more of these elements, you can control
bacterial growth. Water and pH are controlled in manufactured products
such as tinned, pickled or dried foods. You can easily manage time and
temperature of your food.
The use of time as a control for ready to eat potentially hazardous
food
-------------------------------------------------------------------
You are required to maintain the temperature of potentially hazardous
food either at or below 5°C or at or above 60°C at all times, unless
the food business can demonstrate that maintaining food at another
temperature for a specific length of time will not adversely affect
the microbiological safety of the food.
It is very difficult for most food businesses to scientifically
demonstrate alternative time and temperature combinations to ensure
safe food. Safe Food Australia: A guide to the food safety standards
(2nd Ed. Jan 2001) provides advice to food businesses on the use of
time as a control for potentially hazardous foods through the
4-hour/2-hour guide.
As a general rule, the total time that a ready-to-eat potentially
hazardous food can be at temperatures between 5°C and 60°C is 4 hours.
The 4 hour limit is based on a worst-case scenario. After this time
the food must be discarded. The total time is the sum of the time the
food is at temperatures between 5°C and 60°C after it has been cooked
or otherwise processed to make it safe. For example, if raw meat is
cooked, count the time the food is at temperatures between 5°C and
60°C after it is cooked.
It is safe for potentially hazardous food to be between 5°C and 60°C
for a limited time because, as discussed earlier, food poisoning
bacteria need time to grow to unsafe levels.
The ‘2 hour/4 hour guide’ is summarised below.
Any ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food, if it has been at
temperatures between 5°C and 60°C:
*
for a total of less than 2 hours, must be refrigerated or used
immediately;
*
for a total of longer than 2 hours but less than 4 hours, must be
used immediately; or
*
for a total of 4 hours or longer, must be thrown out.
However, as catering operations are considered high risk situations,
it is strongly recommended that operations discard any food that has
been between 5°C and 60°C for a period of 2 hours or more.
If you wish to maintain potentially hazardous food between the
temperatures of 5°C and 60°C for time periods longer than the 2 hours
and 4 hours specified above, you will need to be able to demonstrate
that the extension in time will not compromise the safety of the food.
For example, if a potentially hazardous food will be stored at a
maximum temperature of 15°C, it will be able to be safely kept at this
temperature for longer than 4 hours. However, food businesses will
need to be able to justify this extension on the basis of sound
scientific evidence, as the amount of time that is safe will vary
depending on the type of food and the pathogens of concern.
Use of time as a control for cooked and cooled potentially hazardous
foods
--------------------------------------------------------------------
You can still utilise the ‘2 hour/4 hour guide’ for potentially
hazardous food that has been cooked and cooled, provided you can
demonstrate that the food was cooled in accordance with the following
procedure:
*
cooled from 60°C to 21°C within 2 hours; and
*
cooled from 21°C to 5°C within a further 4 hours.
In order to cool food within these timeframes, you may need to alter
the way you cool foods. Some examples may be:
*
divide large volumes of cooked foods into smaller containers;
*
cut or divide large roasts into smaller portions; and
*
allow plenty of space between cooling items to allow circulation
of cold air.
Use of time as a control for food that has been cooked by another
business
-----------------------------------------------------------------
If you wish to utilise the ‘2 hour/4 hour guide’ for potentially
hazardous food you have not cooked or otherwise processed to ensure
its safety, you will need to know the temperature history of the food.
You will need to know whether, following the cooking or other process
step, the food has spent any time at a temperature between 5°C and
60°C. If any of the available time has been ‘used up’ before you
receive the food, this time must be counted. If you do not know the
temperature history of the food and are not able to obtain this
information, you cannot make use of time to control the growth of
food-borne pathogens and must keep the food at or below 5°C or at or
above 60°C.
Support program 5 – Pest control
================================
What is a pest?
---------------
A pest is any animal that could contaminate food, either directly or
indirectly. It includes, but is not limited to, birds, rodents,
insects and arachnids (spiders).
Preventing pests
----------------
You must prevent pests, to the extent that it is practicable, from
entering your premises and eradicate any pests that do enter.
Excluding pests reduces the opportunities for contamination of food.
Pests transmit spoilage and food poisoning micro-organisms, damage
food and food packaging and might contaminate food with their bodies,
faeces, urine and hair. In addition to contaminating food, rats and
mice might nest in roof spaces and damage cables and pipes by gnawing.
The type of pest-proofing measures required will vary across
Queensland. However, there are many well-known measures that will
limit access by pests, such as:
*
pest-proof doors and entrances into the building with flyscreen
doors or self-closing doors;
*
install mesh screens at opening windows or other ventilation
openings;
*
ensure drains, grease traps and ventilation pipes are sealed;
*
seal openings where pipes pass through external walls to prevent
pests such as rats and mice entering food handling areas; and
*
install appropriate flashing to the base of wooden doors if there
is a problem with mice gaining access through doorways.
It is not intended that premises be pest-proofed when there is no
likelihood of pests gaining access. In some instances the exclusion
measures may be more appropriate to the whole complex, as in the case
of a shopping mall containing a food hall.
You must also prevent the provision of harbourage for pests. Places in
the premises that may provide harbourage should be eliminated. For
example, where practicable, boxed-in areas that are difficult to
completely seal should be opened up or provided with access for
inspection and cleaning.
Due to the nocturnal habits of most pests, contamination of food may
go unnoticed for some time until the infestation is large enough for
pests to be spotted. In addition, it is difficult to eliminate large
infestations.
How often do I need to spray?
-----------------------------
Regular treatment by a professional Pest control operator is strongly
recommended as they are skilled in the safe application of pesticides
in a food premises. There is no prescribed frequency for treatment, as
this will vary depending on the requirements of the premises and the
product used by the Pest control operator.
Support program 6 – Waste management
====================================
Storage of garbage and recyclable matter
----------------------------------------
You must have storage facilities for garbage and recyclable matter
suitable for the volume and types of garbage and recyclable material
produced. They must not provide a breeding ground for pests and must
be capable of being easily and effectively cleaned.
Storage facilities are intended to include all the areas and equipment
used in connection with garbage and recyclable material storage. It
includes:
*
outside storage areas where bins are stored;
*
garbage rooms or refrigerated garbage rooms;
*
garbage chutes;
*
bins, hoppers and other storage containers whether used outside
the buildings or in food handling areas; and
*
compactor systems and the rooms in which they are kept.
‘Garbage and recyclable matter’ includes food waste, paper, cardboard,
glass, metal (whether recycled or not) and any other waste material
produced by the business that has to be stored before it is removed.
The outside area or room that houses the containers must also be
adequate for the volume and types of waste. There is no requirement to
use refrigerated garbage rooms although this may be necessary for some
businesses to prevent putrefaction and odour problems.
The areas and bins where garbage and recyclable matter is stored must
be able to be easily and effectively cleaned. Your food safety program
should cover the process of storage and removal of garbage and
recyclable matter, along with the process and frequency for cleaning
storage area and bins.
A food business must maintain the food premises to a standard of
cleanliness where there is no accumulation of garbage, except in
garbage containers; recycled matter, except in containers; food waste;
dirt; grease; or other visible matter.
Waste food must be separated from other foods so that it cannot be
used for human consumption. Waste food can include:
*
food which has been left over by a customer;
*
food which may have been contaminated and unsafe to consume;
*
food that may be contaminated by pests, dirt or dust;
*
food that may be contaminated by chemicals;
*
food which is past its “use by” date;
*
food that has been outside temperature control; and
*
recalled food.
Support program 7 – Product recall schedule
===========================================
Food manufacturers, wholesalers, distributors and importers are
required to have a written Food recall plan. While your catering or
retail premises may not operate as one of the above business types,
they may be part of another business’ recall plan and therefore are
likely to play an important part in the retrieval of recalled food.
If you are informed that food that you use is subject to a recall, you
will be notified either by the supplier or by Queensland Health with
information regarding the product affected (eg. food type, brand name,
package description and size, batch number, flavour line or similar
identification). It will also include information on what to do with
the product.
If you are required to remove recalled stock from sale, you must
ensure the food is:
*
removed from sale immediately;
*
clearly identified as recalled food; and
*
held and kept separate from all other foods until it is disposed
of in accordance with the instructions provided as part of the
recall. Instructions will be provided by either the supplier of
the food, or directly from the government enforcing the recall
process.
If you are still unsure of what to do in the event of an official food
product recall, an environmental health officer in a Queensland Health
Public Health Unit will be able to provide specific advice.
If you think you are required to develop a Food recall system, contact
your local Public Health Unit to discuss the requirements. Information
on how to obtain a copy of the Food Industry Recall Protocol can be
found in Appendix 1 – List of resources.
Support program 8 – Customer complaints
=======================================
It is important to determine the cause of a customer complaint so that
you can prevent the problem from re-occurring.
If a complaint is received, the following actions should be taken:
*
record when the complaint was reported, the person who reported
the complaint and the product the complaint is related to;
*
record details such as pack size, weight and batch number if
appropriate or a general description of a menu item, ingredient or
dish;
*
when these details have been recorded you will need to check the
other records, such as food receipt and storage to determine if
there were any problems detected; and
*
if you find that the complaint may have resulted from lack of
knowledge by staff, limited storage space, cross contamination,
pests or as a result of products supplied by your supplier, then
you will need to record what steps you followed to prevent the
problem from re-occurring. This may also include amending your
food safety program to prevent recurrence of the problem.
Examples of possible actions to take to prevent complaints from
reoccurring are:
*
re-training staff in the proper implementation of the food safety
program;
*
improve or update the maintenance of buildings or equipment; and
*
if the supplier provided a poor quality product, you will need to
inform the supplier and note the action taken by the supplier to
prevent this problem happening again. If you have continuous
problems with a supplier you should change to a supplier who can
provide you with a constant quality product.
Support program 9 – Skills and knowledge
========================================
Staff responsibilities
----------------------
An employee schedule allows you to record relevant information about
the duties of employees involved in the handling of food. Assigning
duties required by the food safety program to an individual or a
position ensures that the duties are completed.
In this section, it is not necessary to assign duties to a specific
person. If your food service operation rotates staff through different
roles or shifts, it is sufficient to assign duties to a position. This
means that whatever staff member is undertaking the position, the
duties will be identical.
Food handlers in your premises are required to comply with your food
safety program. The form may be used as a guide to recording
employee’s duties.
In addition, where the food safety program requires information that
is already managed in another section of your premises, there is no
need to duplicate it. For example, if you are requested to develop a
list of staff and their food handling duties, you can reference
existing job or position descriptions, work orders or other similar
documents.
Food handler skills and knowledge
---------------------------------
Food handlers are required to have skills and knowledge in food safety
and food hygiene that is appropriate to the activities they perform.
The requirements for food handlers are identical to those for the
designated food safety supervisor. However, food handlers are only
required to acquire the skills and knowledge they need to perform
their activities. For example, a food handler who is only responsible
for serving food needs only skills and knowledge relating to serving
food.
All food handlers and supervisors of food handling operations are
required to have an adequate level of skills and knowledge of food
safety for the work they do. The only exemption is for food handlers
involved in charitable or community fundraising events that sell food
that is not potentially hazardous or that will be eaten immediately
after being cooked thoroughly. The requirements for skills and
knowledge are contained in Food Safety Standard 3.2.2 Food Safety
Practices and General Requirements. Specific training competencies in
Queensland should be checked with your local government.
Strategies to ensure food handlers have the skills and knowledge
required
----------------------------------------------------------------
*
provide new and existing staff with a copy of Support Program 3 -
Personal hygiene and health of food handlers and advise staff of
their obligations as food handlers for each task that they do;
*
staff, supervisors and managers should attend food safety courses
conducted by local government or industry bodies;
*
in-house training by business employees or the proprietor;
*
distribution of relevant documentation to employees;
*
having operating procedures in place that clarify the
responsibilities of food handlers and supervisors;
*
hiring a consultant to present a course to business employees; and
*
formal training courses.
Examples of skills and knowledge required:
------------------------------------------
*
receipt eg. check that potentially hazardous foods are delivered
below 5°C or above 60°C;
*
storage eg. store food in sealed containers to protect it from
contamination;
*
processing eg. cool potentially hazardous food from 60°C to 21°C
in 2 hours and from 21°C to 5°C within a further 4 hours;
*
display eg. supervise food display to prevent contamination from
customers;
*
packaging eg. only use packaging material that is not likely to
contaminate food;
*
transport eg. transport potentially hazardous food under
temperature control;
*
disposal eg. identify and separate food for disposal; and
*
recall eg. have a recall system in place if you are involved in
wholesale supply, manufacture or importation.
Support program 10 – Staff training
===================================
Developing and maintaining staff training will enable staff to meet
the skills and knowledge requirements of the Food Safety Standards and
comply with the food safety program. These standards require anyone
undertaking or supervising food handling to have skills and knowledge
of food safety and food hygiene matters, appropriate to their work
activities.
Formal training is not necessarily required by all staff. Training can
be defined as anything that increases the skills and knowledge of food
handlers. There are many different things you can do and factors you
should take into account to ensure that food handlers have the skills
and knowledge they need for their work.
Examples:
---------
*
‘in house’ training by other staff, the owner of the business or
using a suitable training kit;
*
giving staff food safety and food hygiene information from
reliable sources to read;
*
developing standard operating rules and induction documents based
on food safety requirements that set out the responsibilities of
food handlers and their supervisors;
*
signs located throughout work area (eg. poster on how to wash
hands located over hand basin);
*
sending staff to food safety courses run by industry associations
or hiring a consultant to run a course for the staff; and
*
recruiting staff with formal industry-based training
qualifications.
You can choose the approach that best suits your operation, provided
you are confident that staff have the skills and knowledge needed for
the work they do. A sample of a food handler skills and knowledge
checklist that can be used to ensure food handlers have the
appropriate range of specific skills, knowledge and responsibilities
of their duties is included in the checklists following.
Checklists
==========
Food handler skills and knowledge checklist
-------------------------------------------
As a food handler, you have certain legal obligations to help protect
both your customers and you from potential food borne illness. Please
complete this checklist after completing your food safety training. If
you have any questions, ask your supervisor for advice.
Place your initials in each box once you have understood each section.
It is important that you understand these obligations, so please ask
for clarification from your supervisor if you require assistance.
Legal obligations
Obligations
Food handler signature
As a food handler, I must take all reasonable measures not to handle
food or surfaces likely to come into contact with food in a way that
is likely to compromise the safety and suitability of food.
As a food handler, if I have a condition or a symptom that indicates
that I may be suffering from a food borne disease, or if I know I am
suffering from a food borne disease, or that I am a carrier of a food
borne disease, whilst at work I must:
*
report this to my supervisor;
*
not engage in any handling of food where there is a likelihood
that I might contaminate food as a result of the disease or
condition; and
*
take all practicable measures to prevent food from being
contaminated as a result of the disease or condition if my
supervisor allows me to do other work on the food premises.
As a food handler, I must notify my supervisor if I know or suspect
that I may have contaminated any food that I have handled.
As a food handler, when engaging in any food handling operation, I
must:
*
take all practicable measures to ensure my body, anything from my
body, and anything I am wearing does not contaminate food or
surfaces likely to come into contact with food;
*
take all practicable measures to prevent unnecessary contact with
ready-to-eat food;
*
ensure my outer clothing is of a level of cleanliness that is
appropriate for the handling of food that I am involved with;
*
cover any exposed bandages and dressings with highly visible
waterproof coverings;
*
not eat over unprotected food or surfaces likely to come into
contact with food;
*
not sneeze, blow or cough over unprotected food or surfaces likely
to come into contact with food;
*
not spit, smoke or use tobacco or similar preparations in areas in
which food is handled; and
*
always use the designated toilet facilities.
As a food handler, I must wash my hands:
*
whenever they are likely to be a source of contamination of food;
*
immediately before working with ready-to-eat food or after
handling raw food;
*
immediately after using the toilet;
*
before commencing or re-commencing handling food;
*
immediately after smoking, coughing, sneezing, using a
handkerchief or disposable tissue, eating, drinking or using
tobacco or similar substances; and
*
after touching my hair, scalp or a body opening.
As a food handler, I must wash my hands in the manner described below,
when engaging in a food handling operation that involves unprotected
food or surfaces likely to come into contact with food:
*
with warm running water; and
*
using soap
Keeping your program current
============================
Amendment worksheet
The amendment worksheet is a means of recording any changes you have
made to your food safety program. Remember that any major process
changes will require your program to be re-submitted to the local
government for accreditation. If you are unsure if your changes are
considered major, contact your local government for assistance.
Name of document amended
Details of amendment
Removal document authorisation date
New document authorisation date
Old document removed by:
Are you ready to be audited?
============================
Audit readiness checklist
-------------------------
The audit readiness checklist is designed as a final check to ensure
that you have completed all of the necessary parts of the food safety
program development tool before you submit your program for
accreditation. It is not meant to ensure that you have completed all
the steps correctly. This will be determined by your local government
when they accredit and audit your program.
Note: Tick the box for each activity you have completed, but also tick
the box if this activity is not relevant to your business activities.
Have you completed all information to identify the premises at which
this food safety program will be implemented and the person(s)
responsible for its implementation and ongoing management?
Have you identified all food handling processes?
Activity 1 – Purchasing
Activity 2 – Receiving
Activity 3 – Dry storage
Activity 4 – Cold storage
Activity 5 – Freezer storage
Activity 6 – Thawing
Activity 7 – Preparation
Activity 8 – Cooking food
Activity 9 – Cooling food
Activity 10 – Reheating and hot holding
Activity 11 – Serving, self-service and displaying food
Activity 12 – Allergens, packing and labelling
Activity 13 – Transporting food
Activity 14 – Off-site events
Identified and documented all of the records and supporting documents
that need to be kept?
Planned appropriate food safety and hygiene training for all food
handlers and managers involved with handling food and the
implementation of the food safety program?
Congratulations. If you have ticked every box above, you are ready to
submit your food safety program to your local government. Contact
details are listed in Appendix 1.
Frequently asked questions
==========================
You can use this section to get a brief answer to frequently asked
questions regarding food safety programs. Please note that responses
to these frequently asked questions are based on the requirements of
Queensland’s food safety legislation and are not reflective of other
policies or requirements on your premises, such as infection control
practices.
FAQ
Answer
How often do I need to monitor:
*
refrigeration units
*
other temperatures
*
personal hygiene
*
cleanliness
*
food receipt
There is no prescribed frequency for monitoring controls in your food
safety program. The appropriate frequency must be determined on a case
by case basis. The environmental health officer from your local
government can assist in determining an appropriate frequency for your
premises that will provide sufficient historical information without
imposing resource intensive work practices.
Do I need to make up a dummy plate to verify my processes?
A dummy plate may be an effective means of verifying the food service
process. However, as with monitoring, there is no prescribed frequency
on how often this should occur.
What is the 2 hour/4 hour guide?
The 2 hour/4 hour guide is a scientifically validated method of using
time to control the safety of ready-to-eat potentially hazardous food.
See support program 4.
What is skills and knowledge?
Skills and knowledge is the requirement for all people involved
in the handling of food to understand and demonstrate appropriate food
safety and food hygiene practices.
Do I need to go to a training course to get skills and knowledge?
No. Skills and knowledge for food handlers can be obtained in many
ways beyond formal training courses. However, contact your local
government for information relating to the competencies required for a
food safety supervisor.
Can I set my controls more stringent than the legislative
requirements?
Yes. However, when your premises is audited, you need to demonstrate
that you are complying with the requirements of your food safety
program.
Can I designate more than one food safety supervisor?
Yes. Many facilities will have to have more than one person as a food
safety supervisor who must be reasonably available while food handling
is being undertaken.
What skills and knowledge does the food safety supervisor need?
The food safety supervisor must have the same skills and knowledge as
all food handlers which they supervise. In addition, food safety
supervisors must also meet certain competencies in food safety. Your
local government will be able to advise you of these competencies.
What is safe and suitable food?
Food is considered to be unsafe if it is likely to cause physical harm
(eg illness). Unsuitable food is damaged or deteriorated in a way to
prevent its use (eg mould growth, foreign objects).
Can I use bleach to clean my benches?
Chlorine bleach is an acceptable chemical bleach for use in sanitising
food contact surfaces and utensils.
Can I accept a product with broken packaging?
No. The Food Safety Standards specify that you must only accept food
that is protected from the likelihood of contamination. Food receipt
is the first point that you have real control over the safety of food.
When you receive food in broken packaging, you cannot be sure that it
has not been contaminated and should be returned to the supplier.
Can my food safety program be used for national accreditation?
Queensland Health is currently consulting with national bodies to
establish recognised food safety programs developed under Queensland’s
legislative requirements for national accreditation purposes.
Information will be distributed at the outcome of this consultation.
Do I have to wear hairnets, hats or gloves to handle food?
No. Hairnets and gloves are not a mandatory requirement of food
legislation. However, food handlers are required to prevent food being
contaminated by anything from their body (eg. hair, fingernails,
bandaids, jewellery etc).
Hairnets, hats and gloves may be the most effective means to prevent
contamination, depending on the nature of your food handling
activities.
Do I have to have a thermometer?
Yes. All food premises are required to have at least one probe
thermometer accurate to +/- 1°C on the premises.
How do I check the temperature of packaged foods (eg. milk, packaged
frozen chickens)?
It is not expected that the temperature of these items be measured by
breaking the packaging at the point of food receipt. This may lead to
issues of contamination if undertaken outside in a delivery area. The
most appropriate method is to place your thermometer between two
packages (eg. between 2 bottles of milk). If this method is used, it
may
take a slightly longer period for your thermometer to adjust and
provide an accurate temperature.
Can the “cook’s dishes” be washed in the sink that is used to wash
vegetables and salad ingredients? Does the sink have to be sanitised
between use?
The Food Safety Standards require fixture, fittings and equipment
adequate for producing safe and suitable food.
If you regularly wash fruits and vegetables, you will be required to
have a designated food preparation sink. This sink should not be used
for washing equipment and utensils or hand washing. The food
preparation sink must also be sanitised before being used for washing
foods.
Are the kitchen and other areas (eg. coolrooms) restricted to access
only by food handlers?
There is no restriction of access in Queensland’s legislation.
However, any person who enters a food premises has a responsibility to
ensure they do not contaminate food or act in a way that may cause
food to become unsafe or unsuitable. This includes how they store
their food (eg. if they put their lunch in the cool room), not sitting
on benches, not smoking, spitting etc and not handling food unless
they have appropriate skills and knowledge to do so.
Record 1 – Approved suppliers list
==================================
Supplier No.
Details of supplier (Name, address, contact details)
Product Description
Approved supplier
Date approved
Corrective Action – Reject suppliers that do not supply food in the
approved manner (see record 2)
Record 2 – Approved food supplier agreement form
================================================
Supplier:
Address:
Phone:
Goods supplied:
Frequency of delivery:
Daily Weekly Fortnightly Monthly Irregularly
General requirements for the products:
All food products are to be supplied in good, fresh condition, free
from any odour, discolouration or signs of spoilage or contamination
and under temperature control (ie below 5°C or above 60°C).
Package and labelling requirements:
All food products are to be delivered in food grade containers that
are free from chemical or physical contaminants. Labelling shall
comply with the requirements of the Food Standards Code.
Transport requirements:
All food products are to be transported in clean food transport
vehicles. The foods are not to be transported in direct contact with
meat, animals, plants, pests or chemicals or exposed to sunlight. All
potentially hazardous foods (dairy foods, meat, fish and smallgoods)
must be transported under refrigeration at or below 5°C for cold food
and at or above 60°C for hot food. Frozen food is to be delivered
frozen hard (not partially thawed). If food is transported between 5°C
and 60°C, it must be demonstrated that the temperature of the food,
having regard to the time taken to transport the food, will not
adversely affect the microbiological safety of the food.
Conditions for supply:
It is required that all foods supplied comply with the Food Standards
Code at all times. Failure to do so will result in refusal of the
goods.
Suppliers’ acceptance:
Name:
Position:
Date: Signature:
Business acceptance:
Name:
Position:
Date: Signature:
Record 3 – Incoming goods
=========================
Time
====
Date
====
Supplier No.
============
Product
=======
Temp °C
=======
Visual check
============
Accepted/
=========
Rejected
========
Designated storage area
=======================
Corrective action
=================
Checked by
==========
Corrective Action – Reject food that does not pass the visual check or
is not delivered at the required temperature
======================================================================
Temperature information
*
Cold foods – at or below 5°C
*
F
Note: If you receive bulk orders that already have an itemised
receipt, you may wish to attach the receipt (or a copy) to this
record sheet and then complete only summary details in this
record.
rozen foods – Frozen hard (does not include partially thawed)
*
Hot foods – at or above 60°C
Designated storage areas
The incoming goods should be stored in the relevant areas as soon as
possible, these include:
*
Refrigerators/freezers/coolrooms
*
Dry storage
*
Hot holding equipment
Visual check
*
Use by date/Best before date (Foods past the use by date are
prohibited from being sold. Foods past best before date can be
sold provided the food is not damaged, deteriorated or perished)
*
Packaging (damaged, deteriorated, perished or appropriate
material)
*
Labelling (name of food, name and address of supplier, lot
identification)
*
Pest contamination (droppings, eggs, webs, feathers etc)
*
Foreign objects (dirt, metal, hair)
*
Delivery truck (clean, not carrying chemicals or other
contaminants in the same area as food)
Record 4 – Food recall
======================
Supplier/Manufacturer
=====================
Reason for recall
=================
Product
=======
Batch code
==========
Use by date
===========
No. of units in stock
=====================
Corrective action
=================
Checked by
==========
Record 5 – Customer complaints
==============================
Date
Time
Complainants name and contact details
Details of complaint
Investigation details
Corrective action
Checked by
Record 6 – Temperature control log
==================================
Date/Time
Unit/Food description
Visual check
Temp °C
Corrective action
Checked by
Temperature Information
*
Cold foods – at or below 5°C
*
Frozen foods – frozen hard (does not include partially thawed)
*
Hot foods – at or above 60°C
Visual Check
*
Use by date (foods past this date are prohibited from being sold)
*
Best before date (foods past this date can be sold provided the
food is not damaged, deteriorated or perished)
*
Packaging (damaged, deteriorated or perished)
*
Pest contamination (droppings, eggs, webs, feathers etc)
*
Ensure raw foods are stored below ready to eat or cooked foods
(cross contamination)
*
Foreign objects (dirt, metal, hair)
Record 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
==================================
Food description
Date
Time taken out of temp control
Activity
Time placed back in temp control
Total time
Corrective action
Temperature control
*
Maintain potentially hazardous food at a temperature of 5°C or
below or 60°C and above. If food is kept between 5°C and 60°C,
this temperature must be monitored and recorded.
*
Remember when using the 4-hour/2-hour guide, that time periods are
cumulative – each time period that food is kept between 5°C and
60°C has to be added up to reach a total time.
Corrective actions
*
Potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for less than two hours must be refrigerated or used immediately.
*
Potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than two hours but less than four hours must be used
immediately.
*
Potentially hazardous food that has been kept between 5°C and 60°C
for longer than four hours must be thrown out
Record 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
==================================
Daily cleaning and sanitising
List areas or equipment to be cleaned on a daily basis.
Week starting / / .
Area/
Equipment
Responsible person
Completed
M
T
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
Weekly cleaning and sanitising
List all areas, equipment, etc to be cleaned once a week (or more
regularly than daily) and identify the person responsible.
Week starting / / .
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Monthly cleaning and sanitising
List all areas, equipment, etc to be cleaned monthly (or more
regularly than weekly)
Month
Wk starting / / .
Wk starting / / .
Wk starting / / .
Wk starting / / .
Monthly task
Resp person
Monthly task
Resp person
Monthly task
Resp person
Monthly task
Resp person
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Checked by
Quarterly / Yearly cleaning and sanitising
List all areas, equipment, etc to be cleaned yearly (or more regularly
than monthly)
Year
Task
Resp person
Date scheduled
Date completed
Checked by
Record 9 – Equipment maintenance and calibration of thermometers
Date
Area/Equipment checked
Result (repair or service required)
Corrective action
Checked by
Record areas or equipment checked for defects. For example floors,
walls and ceilings could be checked monthly for any cracks or
crevices. Thermometers must be accurate to within + /- 1 °C.
Record 10 – Pest control
========================
Date
Area checked/ treated
Result (pests found)
Action taken
Checked by
Record internal inspections conducted by your business for example
once every 4 – 6 weeks. Record external inspections/treatments
conducted by your Pest control operator for example once every 3
months.
Record 11 – Staff illness
Staff members name
Date
Type of illness
Checked by
Staff should not return to handling food until they have received
clearance from a medical practitioner.
Record 12 – Staff training
==========================
Staff members name
Date
Description / details of instruction / training undertaken
Checked by
Food handling - skills and knowledge
Food Safety Standard 3.2.2 requires that a food business must ensure
that persons undertaking or supervising food handling operations have
appropriate skills and knowledge in food safety and food hygiene
matters for their level of food handling.
This standard does not require mandatory training to demonstrate
appropriate skills and knowledge, but recognises that skills and
knowledge can be obtained in different ways.
Examples for obtaining the skills and knowledge required include:
*
In-house training by business employees or the proprietor;
*
Distribution of relevant documentation to employees;
*
Having operating procedures in place that clarify the
responsibilities of food handlers and supervisors;
*
Attendance at food safety courses run by local government or other
bodies such as industry associations;
*
Hiring a consultant to present a course to business employees; and
*
Formal training courses.
Record 13 – Off-site catering events
Part 1 – before the event checklist
Yes
No
Corrective action
Does the site have adequate facilities for food storage, preparation,
cooking, reheating and hot holding and display?
Have arrangements been made for equipment to be made available if not
already at the site?
Have transport arrangements been made to get the food to the site, for
cold, frozen and hot foods?
(refer to activity 13)
Are temperatures of chilled, frozen and hot foods monitored on
arrival?
(refer to activity 2)
Are products checked on arrival for contamination?
(refer to activity 2)
Is all food protected from contamination?
Are products in appropriate packaging and labelled correctly?
(refer to activity 12)
Are all the food suppliers included in your Approved food suppliers
list?
If not please record additional suppliers on approved suppliers list.
Have arrangements been made to collect waste during and after the
event?
(refer to support program 6)
Have all staff been trained to follow the Food Safety Program and have
the appropriate skills and knowledge to produce safe and suitable
food?
(refer to support program 9)
Are hand washing facilities, cleaning facilities and cleaning
materials available at the site?
(refer to support program 2 and 3)
Is potable water used for all food handling activities?
If non-potable water is used, the food business must demonstrate that
non-potable water will not adversely affect the safety of food.
Check that all equipment and utensils are clean and ready for use.
(refer to support program 2)
Are there any signs of pest infestation at the site?
(refer to support program 5)
Are transport coolers or storage coolers stocked with sufficient ice
blocks?
Are cooked and raw foods separated in storage?
(refer to activity 3, 4 & 5)
Are all foods stored off the ground?
Part 2 – during the event checklist
This record must be completed each day of the event
Date / / .
Checklist
Yes
No
Corrective action
Are there any potentially hazardous foods not stored under temperature
control?
Record the temperature of food not stored under Temperature control
(refer to support program 4)
Check and record temperatures of cold foods in storage/ on display
(refer to support program 4)
Check and record temperatures of frozen foods in storage/ on display
(refer to support program 4)
Check and record temperatures of hot foods in storage/ on display
(refer to support program 4)
Is there any risk of cross contamination from raw food to ready to eat
foods?
Are separate utensils being used for different foods?
Are staff checking cooked foods to make sure they are fully cooked?
Are all foods on display protected from contamination?
Are cooked hot foods displayed in adequate hot holding equipment?
Are staff following good hygiene practices?
(refer to support program 3)
Is food waste disposed of appropriately?
(refer to support program 6)
Have all equipment and utensils been cleaned?
(refer to support program 2)
Has potentially hazardous food been kept between 5°C and 60°C for less
than two hours?
If yes the food must be refrigerated or used immediately (refer to
support program 4)
Has potentially hazardous food been kept between 5°C and 60°C for more
than two hours but less than four hours?
If yes the food must be used immediately. (refer to support program 4)
Has potentially hazardous food been kept between 5°C and 60°C for more
than four hours?
If yes the food must be disposed of immediately (refer to support
program 4)
Has all waste been removed from the site?
Record 14 – Food safety program review
Weekly food safety program review
Date of review: Reviewed by:
Activity
Yes
No
Observation/Corrective action
1. Purchasing and receiving goods
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 1 & 2?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 1– Approved food suppliers list
*
Record No. 2 – Approved food supplier agreement form
*
Record No. 3 – Incoming goods
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
2. Dry Storage
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 3?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
*
Record No. 10 – Pest control
3. Cold Storage
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 4?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
4. Frozen Storage
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 5?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
5. Thawing frozen food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 6?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
6. Preparation
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 7?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
7. Cooking food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 8?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
8. Cooling food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 9?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
9. Reheating and hot holding food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 10?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
10. Serving, self service and displaying food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 11?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 – Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
*
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
11. Food packaging and labelling
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 12?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 4 – Food recall Record
*
Record No. 5 – Customer complaints
*
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
*
Record No. 9 – Equipment maintenance and calibration of
thermometers
*
Record No. 10 – Pest control
12. Transporting food
*
Are staff following the checks contained in Activity 13?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 6 - Temperature control log
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
*
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
13. Off-site events
*
Has the off-site events checklist been followed and completed?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 7 – The 2 hour/4 hour guide
*
Record No. 13- Off-site events
14. Other
*
Have there been any changes in staff, processes or activities?
*
If so, have the necessary amendments to the food safety program,
records and task allocations been made?
*
Are any new or replacement utensils/appliances/equipment needed?
*
Have there been any changes to the cleaning schedules?
*
Have there been any problems with waste disposal?
*
Have any of the staff been ill, particularly with a food-borne
illness?
*
Were there any food complaints/incidents/recalls?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 4 – Food recall
*
Record No. 5 – Customer complaints
*
Record No. 11 – Staff Illness/accidents
*
Record No. 12 – Staff Instruction/training
Please record the details of any other issues identified and the
corrective action undertaken.
Activity
Yes
No
Observation/Corrective action
Monthly food safety program review
Date of review: Reviewed by:
Program component
Yes
No
Observation/
Corrective action
1. Facility and equipment maintenance
*
Has all equipment been checked?
*
Is all equipment operating correctly?
*
Has the entire food premises been thoroughly checked for
structural problems?
*
Are there any structural problems?
*
Has the following record been completed?
*
Record No. 9 – Equipment maintenance and calibration of
thermometers
2. Temperature measuring devices
*
Have all temperature-measuring devices been checked for
calibration?
*
Are temperature measuring devices calibrated to standard
procedures?
*
Do all staff know how to take accurate temperatures with each
temperature measuring device?
*
Has the following record been completed?
*
Record No. 9 – Equipment Maintenance and Calibration of
Thermometers
3. Pest control
*
Are all activities and support programs followed that identify
where pests may breed or enter?
*
Are all areas clean and free from food particles and other waste
that may attract pests?
*
Has your premises been treated by your Pest control operator at
the correct intervals as in your support program?
*
Have the following records been completed?
*
Record No. 8 – Cleaning and sanitising
*
Record No. 10 – Pest control
4. Staff Instruction/training
*
Have all staff been instructed/trained so that they have the
appropriate skills and knowledge in food hygiene and handling for
the tasks they do?
*
Do staff understand their food safety responsibilities?
*
Has the following record been completed?
*
Record No. 12 – Staff Instruction and Training
5. Customer complaints
*
Are Customer complaints addressed?
*
Are there any recurring problems identified as a result of
Customer complaints?
*
Has the following record been completed?
*
Record No. 5 – Customer complaints
Annual food safety program review
Date of review: Reviewed by:
Program component
Yes
No
Observation/
Corrective action
Food Safety Program
*
Have there been any changes to the forms used in my food safety
program?
*
Are the activities listed in the flow diagram still applicable to
my business?
*
Have there been any updates to the Tool?
*
If so have the relevant sections in Food Safety Program folder
been replaced?
Food safety program audit
*
Has an audit been conducted at the correct frequency?
*
Have any problems been identified?
*
Have these problems been rectified?
Record keeping
*
Are all records being filled out correctly?
*
Are corrective actions being undertaken where problems have been
identified?
*
Is additional training required?
*
Note any problems
Please record the details of any other issues identified and the
corrective action undertaken.
Activity
Yes
No
Observation/
Corrective action
Appendix 1 Local government contact details
===========================================
Contact details for your local government can be found in the Business
and Government Listings in your local White Pages.
Alternatively you can obtain local government details from the
following Department of Infrastructure. Local Government and Planning
website www.dilgp.qld.gov.au/local-government-directory/
Useful Resources
================
Topic
What it is
Where to get it
Food Safety Standards
The national standards governing operational and structural
requirements in food premises
Food Standards Australia New Zealand website www.foodstandards.gov.au
Safe Food Australia
A guide to the Food Safety Standards
Food Standards Australia New Zealand website www.foodstandards.gov.au
Food Safety: An audit system
Standard process for auditing food safety programs
Food Standards Australia New Zealand website www.foodstandards.gov.au
Know your food business
A self-assessment checklist for compliance with the Food Safety
Standards
Queensland Health website www.health.qld.gov.au
Management of food safety programs, Food Act 2006
A guideline endorsed under the Food Act 2006 outlining the
requirements for the administration, accreditation, auditing and
enforcement of food safety programs under the Food Act 2006
Queensland Health website www.health.qld.gov.au
Queensland Health
Tool for development of a food safety program – Private Hospitals
www.health.qld.gov.au

Tool for development of a food safety program – Catering and retail
premises
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